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hello to visitors from around the world!

October 1, 2012

Since February 2012, these recipes have had visitors from:

Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Bermuda, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Fiji, Finland, France, Gambia, French Guiana, Georgia, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Guam, Guatemala, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Lithuania, Macedonia, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Martinique, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Palestine, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Réunion, Romania, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, U.S. Virgin Islands, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zambia.

(125 countries out of 206!)

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Please leave a comment! Teach me how your family makes something, or share what you think about a recipe you tried!

I’d love to see a community of people sharing their experiences and preferences so we can all learn more!

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There are a million ways to browse these 350+ recipes. Check out my favorite recipes here, or how about over 120 different ways to love vegetables? (Of course, there’s also 80+ dessert recipes…)

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baked brown bread

April 26, 2018

another gem from the Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads! he says this is just the same as boston brown bread, but baked instead of steamed in a coffee can.

1/2 cup yellow or white cornmeal
1.5 c all purpose flour
1 cup each rye and whole wheat flour
1 cup packed brown sugar (note: do not use this much if using a sweetened molasses)
1 cup molasses
2 t each baking soda and salt
2 c buttermilk, or homemade kefir, or milk thickened with lemon juice
1 c broken walnuts

9″ or larger dutch oven or equivalent covered casserole, greased

to a large bowl, add the cornmeal, rye, whole wheat, and all purpose flours. add brown sugar, molasses, baking soda, and salt. pour in buttermilk and mix well. stir in walnuts.

pour mixture into dutch oven. cover. DO NOT PREHEAT THE OVEN. when dutch oven is inside your cold oven, turn it on to 350 and bake for about an hour. test for doneness like brownies: stick a toothpick or wood skewer into the middle and if crumbs cling to the toothpick, cook the bread longer.

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from Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads

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wow! not sure how this would taste without the weird local sorghum molasses i used, which is heavily sweetened (but was the only choice of molasses under $8 at the co-op, haha). if you are using some molasses like this, cut down on the sugar by quite a bit. this came out as sweet as banana bread. the rye flour and whole wheat flour are almost undetectable – at least, when masked by that much sugar. this recipe makes one giant loaf of beautiful brown bread. i’ll cut this loaf in half next time because it was enough to eat every day for a week and still give half away. everyone who tried it loved it. if you don’t feel like steaming your bread in a coffee can, and you have a big dutch oven, and you want something almost like banana bread but not quite, give this a try!

next time, i will
– add the whole cup of walnuts
– cut the recipe in half
– cut down the brown sugar or use unsweetened molasses

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english oatmeal bread

April 23, 2018

thanks so much to Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads – my new favorite bread book! if you have a favorite bread book, leave it in the comments!

2 cups rolled oats / oatmeal
2 cups milk
1 package yeast
2 T butter, room temperature
2 t salt
1 c whole wheat flour
2 c bread flour or unbleached flour
1 egg, beaten, mixed with 1 T water

(this makes 2 loaves; cut in half for one loaf)

soak oatmeal in milk for 2 hours

stir yeast into oatmeal mixture, add butter, salt, and whole wheat flour. beat by hand 100 strokes or in an electric mixer at medium speed. add 1/2 c white flour and continue beating for two minutes.

stir in balance of flour, 1/2 c at a time. the dough will be a rough, shaggy mass that cleans the sides of the bowl. if it is slack and moist, and sticks to the fingers, sprinkle with a little extra flour. (NOT TOO MUCH – I ADDED TOO MUCH!)

knead 8 mins. “occasionally change the kneading rhythm by raising the dough above the table and crashing it down hard against the surface. wham!

place dough in mixing bowl and pat with buttered fingers to keep the surface from crusting. cover the bowl and rise to twice its original size, about 1.5 hours. or poke – dent remains when dough is risen.

punch down, shape into two loaves. second rise: til doubled, about 45 minutes.

brush tops with egg wash and/or sprinkle with oats on top.

preheat oven to 400 20 mins before baking

bake in the hot oven 30 mins, reduce heat to 350, and continue baking another 20 to 30 minutes

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thanks again to Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads for this great recipe – i really recommend this book for anyone who wants three hundred new recipes to try!

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i made every possible user error with this bread. my yeast was dead, so it didn’t rise, and i added way too much flour to the dough. it was still edible despite its outerworldly denseness, so i’m definitely going to give this another shot with some living yeast soon.

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latkes

April 21, 2018

Found my old recipe journal. This one said only, “latkes: 2 eggs, 1 small onion, 1.5 lb. veggies –> 3 potatoes: 1 onion: 1 egg: 2 T. flour”

I’m going to try to interpret that into a recipe here….

1. Grate 3 potatoes (or a combination of beets, carrots, sweet potatoes, turnips, parsnips.. for a total of 1.5 lbs)
2. Make your least favorite person grate one small onion, or half a large onion, because it will burn their eyes.
3. Combine these in a large bowl with an egg, 2 T. flour (all-purpose flour or gluten-free flour mixes are fine,) and a lot of salt and pepper.
4. Heat canola or vegetable oil on medium-high heat. Smash latkes thin in the pan so they cook all the way through. Flip when you notice a little brown crust. If they stick, let them sit longer, or turn the heat up a bit.

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This is my classic, go-to latke recipe. I don’t make them a lot anymore, because they’re more effort than crunchy-top bleu cheese mashed potatoes or kartoffelsalat. But there’s something really special about a good potato pancake. If this is too basic for you, or not fun enough to say, try zachary’s falafelatke, a chickpea and potato pancake with a very fun name.

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springtime niçoise style salad

April 14, 2018

niçoise salad is amazing and versatile. ever tried it with asparagus? i can’t get fresh green beans in april, so i made an asparagus niçoise style salad for the spring.

the best part is, none of these ingredients are necessary. any leftover vegetables would be great in here. swap out whatever you have or don’t have, and build your dream salad. it’s a great way to use leftover boiled potatoes.

– 1 bunch asparagus
– medium-boiled eggs (the internet said 7 minutes for medium-boiled eggs. but they came out soft-boiled. delicious but not the same.)
– diced artichoke hearts
– chopped olives (use what you have in the house; they don’t have to be nicoise olives)
– leftover boiled potatoes (i used purple fleshed potatoes that were on sale at the co-op and they were beautiful contrasted with the bright green asparagus and bright yellow yolks)
– (optional: tuna or anchovies, if you eat fish)

dressing:
dijon mustard
apple cider vinegar
a few pinches of minced onions or garlic
any fresh herb you have in the house
pinch of salt and pepper

roast asparagus in olive oil on 425 until it cooked but still crunchy, just eight minutes or so

cut everything into bite-sized chunks, like for potato salad or egg salad, top with vinaigrette, and serve.

don’t be constrained by this recipe. get creative! next time, i’d love to add some radishes for crunch. epicurious says to add raw red and yellow bell peppers, fresh tomatoes, and tons of parsley. david lebovitz uses fresh cucumbers, fresh fava beans, fresh basil, and a half a head of lettuce. others call for capers, celery, salmon and sugar, baby beets….

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recipe modified from all the recipes cited above, created by friedsig, and, mostly inspired by this bon apetit recipe that planted itself into my subconscious

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artichokes and asparagus are two of my favorite foods. here you can eat them at the same time!

it’s nice to have a new quick lunch for the week with just a little weekend meal prep. if you make the vinaigrette and roast the asparagus and boil the potatoes and eggs on a weekend, you can construct this salad in five minutes. also, a great seasonal salad: use tomatoes and cucumbers in an august salad, and asparagus and radishes in an april salad. it’s also nice to have a unifying theme, and feel like, “i am eating nicoise salad,” and not, “i am eating this hastily assembled pile of leftovers”

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moroccan roasted vegetable soup

March 14, 2018

just adding this one ingredient (ras-el-hanout – a moroccan spice blend that’s complex and amazing) to a basic roasted vegetable soup is a total game-changer.

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roast one full cookie sheet of chopped veggies (I did carrots, parsnips, sweet potatoes, red potatoes, whole cloves of garlic, and butternut squash) coated in olive oil

roast an onion, too, or chop it raw and saute it in a soup pot or dutch oven.

when soft, add the roasted veggie chunks and a bunch of stock or broth of some kind, whatever you have in the house. also add ras-el-hanout to taste. the original recipe calls for a tablespoon, but my blend is very spicy with tons of cayenne, and barely a teaspoonful was enough.

when everything is totally soft, after simmering for a while, blend the soup and serve.

you can top with plain yogurt, and/or fresh mint.

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adapted by friedsig from the bbc

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almost exactly the same as the vegetable soup i normally make, but the simple addition of ras el hanout makes it taste totally new again. if you’re bored of the same old veggie soup you always make, definitely give this a try! i always make curried red lentil and squash soup, but coconut milk is getting really pricey, and this is a great alternative!

this is one of my newest vegan soup favorites. i will 100% be making this again soon.

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vegetarian buffalo “meatballs”

February 18, 2018

1 to 2 garlic cloves
1 (15-ounce) can white beans, rinsed, drained
1 package mushrooms
1 large egg
1 cup breadcrumbs, panko, pretzel crumbs, etc.
1 celery stalk (optional)
1 teaspoon kosher salt, less if using seasoned breadcrumbs (recipe called for 1t but next time i will cut it in half)

sauce:
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
a ton of vinegar-based hot pepper sauce, like buffalo sauce, tabasco, or frank’s, to taste
a dash of pure maple syrup (optional)

dip:
1/4 – 1/2 cup plain yogurt or sour cream
a splash of kefir or buttermilk, to thin
half a package crumbled blue cheese
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon chopped chives

Preheat to 400°F. Oil a baking sheet or use a silpat.
Pulse garlic in a food processor until finely chopped, or chop by hand. Add celery, beans, and mushrooms and pulse until coarsely chopped, or chop by hand and mash beans coarsely with hands in a bowl. Transfer to a large bowl. Stir in egg, panko, and 3/4 tsp. salt. Using your hands, roll tablespoonfuls of bean mixture into balls. Transfer to prepared baking sheet, packing them snugly. Roast veggie balls, turning halfway through, until firm and cooked through, 25–30 minutes.
Meanwhile, cook butter, hot sauce, and maple syrup in a small saucepan over medium heat until butter is melted. Stir until smooth; set aside.
Whisk sour cream, buttermilk, blue cheese, pepper, 1 Tbsp. plus 2 tsp. chives, and remaining 1/4 tsp. salt in a medium bowl. Top with remaining 1 tsp. chives.
Transfer veggie balls to a large bowl. Toss with hot sauce mixture and serve with blue cheese dip alongside.

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adapted from epicurious

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couldn’t shake a craving for buffalo wings, so i went for this. the dip is nothing new, but the veggie meatballs are a new recipe for me. i was surprised how well they stayed together – even though they did stick to the pan when i reheated them, they still stayed partially assembled. the texture is not meaty, and does suffer from a bit of the mush factor, but the mushrooms help to give it a little more bite, so it’s overall less mushy than other veggie burger recipes i have tried. there is something novel and fun about the “meatball” style, but it’s something i might try in lazy “veggie burger” form next time. i’ll make these again when i am craving restaurant-style junk food.

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panchkuti dal (savory indian lentils)

January 28, 2018

a great savory vegan lentil dish from rajasthan. some people find my favorite gujarati dal too sweet and sour, and dal makhani too heavy. if that sounds like you, and you like something simple and hearty without sugar or cream, try this panchkuti dal. the combination of lentils works really well to set it apart, even though the spice blend reminds me a lot of other northern dal dishes, like dal from nearby punjab. i’ll make this panchkuti dal, also called panchmel dal or panchratan dal or just rajasthani dal, for my vegan or health-conscious friends – it’s one of my favorite lentil recipes with no cream, butter, sugar, or ghee. check out over thirty bean and lentil recipes right here.

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2 tbsp chilkewale urad dal (split black lentils)
2 tbsp toovar (arhar) dal
2 tbsp green moong dal (split green gram)
2 tbsp chana dal (split bengal gram)
2 tbsp masoor dal (split red lentil)
2 tbsp oil
2 tsp mustard seeds ( rai / sarson)
2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera)
about an inch of cinnamon (dalchini)
4 tsp finely chopped garlic (lehsun)
4 tsp finely chopped ginger (adrak)
2 whole dry kashmiri red chillies , broken into pieces
8 curry leaves (kadi patta)
1 bay leaf
pinch of amchur (green mango powder)
1/2 cup chopped tomatoes
1 tsp garam masala
1 tbsp finely chopped coriander (dhania)
0 to 4 minced fresh green chilis
salt to taste
2 tbsp lemon juice

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cook dal by simmering in twice its volume in liquid (i just used a cup as a guide)

or tarladalal recommends, “Wash all the dals and soak them in enough water in a bowl for 1 hour. Drain. Combine the soaked dals with 1 cup of water in a pressure cooker and pressure cook for 3 whistles. Allow the steam to escape before opening the lid. Keep aside.”

in a separate pan, heat oil and add the whole mustard and cumin seeds.
When the seeds crackle, add the cinnamon, garlic, ginger, red chillies and bay and curry leaves and sauté on a medium flame for 1 to 2 minutes.
Add the tomatoes and amchur, and cook over a medium flame for 1 to 2 minutes.
Add the garam masala and green chillies, mix well and cook over a medium flame for 1 minute.
Add the cooked dal, salt and lemon juice, mix well and cook on a medium flame for 5 to 7 minutes, while stirring occasionally.
Serve hot. Top with cilantro leaves and plain yogurt.

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recipe adapted from tarladalal and archana’s kitchen

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(if you don’t have all five kinds of split lentils and peas, just use a combination of anything you have in the house! just make sure to cook whole lentils separately from split peas and lentils – they have a different cook time.)