Posts Tagged ‘vegan’

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hot and sweet plum chutney

August 15, 2019

Nigel Slater’s plum chutney is just what plum season needs. If plum and mustard sounds like a weird combination, think of it kind of like a peach salsa – sour, sweet, hot, and flavorful.

1 1/2 pounds plums
12 ounces onions
a generous 3/4 cup raisins
1 cup light muscovado sugar (I cut this quite a bit)
1/2 teaspoon crushed dried chile (or more if you like it hot!)
1 teaspoon salt (I cut this by at least half and it was fine)
2 teaspoons yellow mustard seeds
2/3 cup cider vinegar
2/3 cup malt vinegar
1 cinnamon stick

1. Halve the plums and discard the pits. Peel and coarsely chop the onions. Put the fruit and onions into a large stainless steel or enameled pan with the raisins, sugar, chile, salt, mustard seeds, vinegars, and cinnamon stick. Bring to a boil, turn down the heat, and leave to simmer for an hour, giving the occasional stir to reduce the risk of the chutney sticking.

2. Spoon into sterilized jars and seal.

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from Nigel Slater via seriouseats

Thought it was just okay… until the next day. After sitting in the fridge for 24 hours, the flavors melded together and I ended up eating it on everything from eggs to chicken. Adds that perfect kick of flavor to almost anything. Next time, I’ll add more chili and turn it into more of a hot sauce! I’d also like to try it blended, although I’m not sure you can still call it chutney without the chunky-but-mushy texture. Y’all know I still prefer a fermented condiment, like cortido, or a Chinese-style hot chili oil, but this is among my favorite vinegar-based condiments. If you like chutney, check out my favorite peanut mint chutney, or this traditional tomato chutney.

Substitutions? I chose some very acidic plums, but it still didn’t need the whole cup of sugar. If you’re using a sweeter fruit, you might not need more than a pinch of sugar. I couldn’t find malt vinegar, so I used about a cup of apple cider vinegar with a splash of unseasoned rice vinegar. & there’s no way this small batch of chutney needs an entire teaspoon of salt. Otherwise, followed it surprisingly closely, and – yes – I recommend it!

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roasted tomato gazpacho

July 16, 2019

Roasting fresh summer tomatoes makes their flavor even more complex. If you have some sweet, one-note tomatoes, roasting them adds depth. Gazpacho adds everything a sweet tomato needs – acidity, and a little garlic and herb flavor.

If you are thinking, “Haven’t you already posted about roasting tomatoes?” – well, technically, yes, I posted a roasted tomato dip in 2011. This gazpacho is like a yogurt-free version of that dip that celebrates bright summer flavors.

Gazpacho is like salsa – everyone does it differently. BA’s recipe calls for shallots; Alton Brown’s calls for tomato juice and lime juice; Barefoot Contessa’s is mostly cucumber; Andrew Zimmern’s calls for a ton of Worcestershire.

Bloggers put everything from mango, to celery and sugar, to cumin, to a huge jalapeño in theirs.

I know everyone likes it chunky, but I’m tagging this with “soft foods” because I prefer a totally blended gazpacho. It’s such a refreshing incredible summer sipper.

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– a few pounds of sweet and acidic tomatoes
– a clove (two if they are small) of garlic
– sweet and/or hot peppers (optional)
roast above on 450 til roasty

cool, peel, then add to blender or giant mortar and pestle) with:
– splash of olive oil
– splash of Worcestershire
– half a cucumber (optional)
– red wine vinegar and/or lemon juice (any sour will do)
– whatever fresh herbs you have in the house (highly recommend fresh basil, dill, chives, and thyme, if you have it!)
– pinch of salt and pepper
– (optional, bloody mary style) a little grated horseradish, tabasco or other vinegary hot sauce, and extra splash of Worcestershire sauce

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recipe by friedsig, based on recipes from rozanne gold and food network magazine

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turkish-style braised eggplant

July 8, 2019

Craving something sweet, healthy, and vegan?

1 large eggplant (about 1 pound)
2 teaspoons salt
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
2 medium onions, roughly chopped
3 tablespoons pine nuts
1 large tomato, peeled, cored and roughly chopped
¼ cup raisins
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon cumin
black pepper
½ cup roughly chopped dill
2 tablespoons roughly chopped parsley
pinch of sugar (optional) 1 teaspoon sugar (optional – the raisins make it very sweet!)
Thick yogurt, for serving
Lemon wedges, for serving

1. Trim ends off the eggplant. With a vegetable peeler, cut off alternating strips of skin. Cut eggplant into 1-inch cubes, place in a colander over a large bowl and toss with salt. Let sit for 30 minutes to 3 hours, rinse well and squeeze to remove as much liquid as possible; do not break cubes up.

2. In a large skillet or saucepan, heat 1/4 cup olive oil over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Add the eggplant cubes and move them around occasionally, until they are rather tender and somewhat browned, about 7 minutes. Remove from the pan with tongs, leaving as much oil as possible in the pan. Set aside.

3. Add remaining oil to the pan with the onions and pine nuts and stir occasionally, until the onions are transparent and some pine nuts are lightly browned, 7 or 8 minutes.

4. Return eggplant to the pan with the tomato, raisins, sugar, cinnamon, cumin and pepper. Mix well, then turn heat to low. Cover the pan and cook until the eggplant is very tender but still in distinct pieces, about 30 minutes. Uncover and continue cooking, stirring once or twice, until the liquid is somewhat thickened, 5 to 10 minutes.

5. Remove the pan from heat and let sit uncovered until it is at room temperature, about 45 minutes. Stir in the dill and parsley, adjust the seasonings to taste and serve, accompanied by yogurt and lemon wedges for squeezing.

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recipe by John Willoughby at the NYT

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I am firmly in the camp of people who never bothers to pan-fry eggplant. Why pan-fry, wasting all that time, when the eggplant just absorbs the oil? This method definitely worked, although the “7 minute pan-fry” was more like 17. The raisins and pine nuts meld perfectly with the other flavors. I cheaped out and skipped the dill and parsley, and it was still good. You can replace the pine nuts with lightly smashed walnuts or even peanuts. Even just a pared-down version of this – pinch of sugar and raisins, tons of eggplant and onions, a few nuts, fresh tomato, cinnamon, and cumin – would be incredible.

The salt cure really extracts a lot of the bitterness, but then again, I used super fresh eggplant from the farmers market that was nowhere near as bitter as the supermarket stuff. I think next time I’ll just roast the eggplant. It’ll turn the dish into more of an eggplant dip than distinct cubes of eggplant, but who cares? It’s easy.

Ended up eating this throughout the week as a dip with crackers, and had no problem finishing the whole thing.

Adding this one to my favorite aubergine / eggplant recipes. If you like the kick of sweetness to balance out the bitterness of the eggplant, this is in the top 3 that I would recommend, along with sweet and sour Indian eggplant, or Georgian-style eggplant stuffed with carrot and parsnip

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blistered peanut-coconut asparagus

June 24, 2019

“Blistering” asparagus is just cooking it over a wildly high heat. Why is this important? Ever tried to bake asparagus low and slow? Asparagus cooked on a low heat gets sickly pale, mushy, and sad. Don’t take my word for it – everyone from Tyler Florence to Bon Appetit to the Barefoot Contessa to Food & Wine Magazine suggests bumping up the temp to at least 400.

2 Tbsp. vegetable oil
12 oz. asparagus, trimmed

1 Fresno chile, seeds removed, finely chopped
2 Tbsp. soy sauce
1 Tbsp. fresh lime juice
1 tsp. honey
1 tsp. toasted sesame oil
1 tsp. finely grated peeled ginger
2 Tbsp. crushed salted, dry-roasted peanuts
2 Tbsp. toasted unsweetened shredded coconut
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Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high.
Cook asparagus, tossing often, until stalks are bright green, blistered in spots, and tender, about 5 minutes.
Season with salt and transfer to a platter.

Stir chile, soy sauce, lime juice, honey, sesame oil, and ginger in a small bowl to combine.
Mix in peanuts and coconut and spoon over asparagus.

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recipe by Claire Saffitz
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I usually roast asparagus on 425 or 450. This recipe called for pan-roasting on the stove, but I bought a whole sheet pans’ worth at the farmers market and didn’t want to bother cooking it in batches over the stove. So I tried to replicate the high heat of a skillet by bumping up the temperature to 500. The middle stayed crunchy, while the outside went all crispy and blistered. It did actually form small blisters on the skin of the asparagus! Definitely my new favorite temperature for roasting asparagus.

As far as the peanut-coconut topping, it was definitely good, but I’ll never make it with springtime asparagus again. Why? Spring asparagus tastes PERFECT by itself. A little olive oil and I’m satisfied. Why conceal the flavor of the vegetable with ginger and other strong flavors? Spring asparagus is sweet enough without honey. Adding this recipe to the “condiments” tag so that I remember to make this peanut-coconut mixture to top something like orange zest rice pilaf, or miso-glazed fish.

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apricot sage cornmeal cookies

June 10, 2019

Do you like a different kind of cookie? There’s no chance someone else will show up to the potluck with this one!

•1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, softened
•3/4 cup sugar
•1 large egg
•3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
•1/2 teaspoon baking soda
•1/4 cup chopped dried apricots
•2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh sage leaves (see notes)
•1/2 cup cornmeal
•1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4t salt

Preheat oven to 350°F. and lightly grease 2 baking sheets.

In a bowl whisk together butter, sugar, and egg until smooth. Sift in flour and baking soda and add apricots, sage, cornmeal, and salt, stirring until combined.
Drop dough (no larger than tablespoons) about 1 inch apart onto baking sheets and bake in batches in middle of oven 10 minutes, or until pale golden. Cool cookies on sheets 2 minutes and transfer to a rack to cool.

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by Gourmet magazine

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Honestly, I wouldn’t call these “savory cookies”. 3/4c flour to 3/4c sugar – they are just as sweet as you are imagining.

Do not make these cookies very large like I did, or they’ll be a bit raw in the middle when the outer edges are perfectly crispy. The second batch (smaller cookies) turned out crispy and evenly baked. I used dry sage powder instead of fresh sage leaves, and next time I will try to find another substitution, because the dry sage was too subtle. Maybe apricot-tarragon next time? I added pecans because I was craving nuts, and so they turned out to be apricot-pecan cookies instead of sage. Pecan meal would be good with this sandy texture. I like that this recipe makes just a small number of cookies. I also like the addition of cornmeal. It tastes like the crispy crust on the edges of a sweet cornbread. It isn’t revelatory, but it’s a nice change of pace. (Use very fine powder cornmeal; don’t be like the woman in the review who complained that the coarse cornmeal she used nearly broke her teeth.) Overall, this recipe isn’t my favorite cookie, but I definitely plan to make it again with a few tweaks.

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asparagus and avocado salad

May 27, 2019

One of the best simple salads ever. Great seasonal flavors. Lots of textures. Super fresh and healthy. Thanks, Kathy – best snack at the potluck by far!

1 lb trimmed asparagus, cut into bite-sized pieces
1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes, cut into bite-sized pieces
2 avocadoes, cubed
crumbled goat cheese
olive oil, Dijon, salt & pepper, and the juice of one lemon

– mix up vinaigrette
– blanch asparagus (barely 3 mins; leave it a bit crisp)
– combine everything

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recipe adapted by our midwife Kathy, original (calling for feta) by oh-so-delicioso

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torshi tareh (persian sour spinach)

May 6, 2019

200 g fresh cilantro/coriander, finely chopped
250 g fresh spinach, finely chopped (or any dark leafy greens)
2 tablespoons dried mint
6 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 medium onion, finely chopped
5 eggs
lemon juice or grape verjuice, to taste
canola oil and butter
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2/3 teaspoon turmeric powder
2 1/2 cups water
salt & pepper to taste

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heat onions in oil. when golden, add garlic and turmeric powder and saute for 1 minute.
add spinach and saute a few minutes. add cilantro, water, salt, pepper, and simmer over med-low til cooked.

dissolve flour in 3 tablespoons of cold water; pour it into the stew and stir. Add butter and lemon juice to taste (you want it sour!) and stir well.

crack the eggs into the center of the pot, do not stir.

cover the pot and cook for 3-4 more minutes. Then stir gently, cover the pot and cook until the eggs are set.

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recipe by cookingandcooking

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A great, simple way to switch up your dark leafy green routine! Great served with other Persian food, like Shirazi salad, cold cucumber yogurt soup, or lentil & butternut squash stew. I ate it with rice and plain yogurt as a great, healthy breakfast!

There are a ton of bugs going around right now – in my area, a stomach flu, pneumonia, and strep groups A and C. This combo of turmeric, garlic, and dark leafy greens is a perfect boost for your immune system! Take care of yourself as the seasons change and eat some veggies!