Posts Tagged ‘vegan’

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apricot sage cornmeal cookies

June 10, 2019

Do you like a different kind of cookie? There’s no chance someone else will show up to the potluck with this one!

•1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, softened
•3/4 cup sugar
•1 large egg
•3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
•1/2 teaspoon baking soda
•1/4 cup chopped dried apricots
•2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh sage leaves (see notes)
•1/2 cup cornmeal
•1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4t salt

Preheat oven to 350°F. and lightly grease 2 baking sheets.

In a bowl whisk together butter, sugar, and egg until smooth. Sift in flour and baking soda and add apricots, sage, cornmeal, and salt, stirring until combined.
Drop dough (no larger than tablespoons) about 1 inch apart onto baking sheets and bake in batches in middle of oven 10 minutes, or until pale golden. Cool cookies on sheets 2 minutes and transfer to a rack to cool.

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by Gourmet magazine

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Honestly, I wouldn’t call these “savory cookies”. 3/4c flour to 3/4c sugar – they are just as sweet as you are imagining.

Do not make these cookies very large like I did, or they’ll be a bit raw in the middle when the outer edges are perfectly crispy. The second batch (smaller cookies) turned out crispy and evenly baked. I used dry sage powder instead of fresh sage leaves, and next time I will try to find another substitution, because the dry sage was too subtle. Maybe apricot-tarragon next time? I added pecans because I was craving nuts, and so they turned out to be apricot-pecan cookies instead of sage. Pecan meal would be good with this sandy texture. I like that this recipe makes just a small number of cookies. I also like the addition of cornmeal. It tastes like the crispy crust on the edges of a sweet cornbread. It isn’t revelatory, but it’s a nice change of pace. (Use very fine powder cornmeal; don’t be like the woman in the review who complained that the coarse cornmeal she used nearly broke her teeth.) Overall, this recipe isn’t my favorite cookie, but I definitely plan to make it again with a few tweaks.

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asparagus and avocado salad

May 27, 2019

One of the best simple salads ever. Great seasonal flavors. Lots of textures. Super fresh and healthy. Thanks, Kathy – best snack at the potluck by far!

1 lb trimmed asparagus, cut into bite-sized pieces
1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes, cut into bite-sized pieces
2 avocadoes, cubed
crumbled goat cheese
olive oil, Dijon, salt & pepper, and the juice of one lemon

– mix up vinaigrette
– blanch asparagus (barely 3 mins; leave it a bit crisp)
– combine everything

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recipe adapted by our midwife Kathy, original (calling for feta) by oh-so-delicioso

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torshi tareh (persian sour spinach)

May 6, 2019

200 g fresh cilantro/coriander, finely chopped
250 g fresh spinach, finely chopped (or any dark leafy greens)
2 tablespoons dried mint
6 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 medium onion, finely chopped
5 eggs
lemon juice or grape verjuice, to taste
canola oil and butter
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2/3 teaspoon turmeric powder
2 1/2 cups water
salt & pepper to taste

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heat onions in oil. when golden, add garlic and turmeric powder and saute for 1 minute.
add spinach and saute a few minutes. add cilantro, water, salt, pepper, and simmer over med-low til cooked.

dissolve flour in 3 tablespoons of cold water; pour it into the stew and stir. Add butter and lemon juice to taste (you want it sour!) and stir well.

crack the eggs into the center of the pot, do not stir.

cover the pot and cook for 3-4 more minutes. Then stir gently, cover the pot and cook until the eggs are set.

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recipe by cookingandcooking

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A great, simple way to switch up your dark leafy green routine! Great served with other Persian food, like Shirazi salad, cold cucumber yogurt soup, or lentil & butternut squash stew. I ate it with rice and plain yogurt as a great, healthy breakfast!

There are a ton of bugs going around right now – in my area, a stomach flu, pneumonia, and strep groups A and C. This combo of turmeric, garlic, and dark leafy greens is a perfect boost for your immune system! Take care of yourself as the seasons change and eat some veggies!

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new york style pizza crust

April 22, 2019

Without question my favorite pizza crust recipe of all-time.

22 1/2 ounces (about 4 1/2 cups) bread flour, plus more for dusting
1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
.35 ounces kosher salt (about 3 teaspoons)
2 teaspoons instant yeast
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
15 ounces lukewarm water

recipe by Kenji @ serious eats

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The recipe was written for a food processor. I’ll include my adaptations.

1. Combine flour, sugar, salt, and yeast in bowl of food processor. Pulse 3 to 4 times until incorporated. Add olive oil and water. Run food processor until mixture forms ball that rides around the bowl above the blade, about 15 seconds. Continue processing 15 seconds longer. (Or, if you’re like me and you don’t have a working food processor, just combine the ingredients with your hands in a huge bowl.)

2. Transfer dough ball to lightly floured surface and knead once or twice by hand until smooth ball is formed. It should pass the windowpane test. (If you don’t have a food processor, knead by hand until it passes the windowpane test, usually 8 to 15 minutes depending on humidity and flour used. Mine took 13 minutes.) Divide dough into three even parts and place each in a covered quart-sized deli container or in a zipper-lock freezer bag. (Each chunk fits perfectly in a big yogurt container.) Place in refrigerator and allow to rise at least one day, and up to 5.

3. At least two hours before baking, remove dough from refrigerator and shape into balls by gathering dough towards bottom and pinching shut. Flour well and place each one in a separate medium mixing bowl. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and allow to rise at warm room temperature until roughly doubled in volume.

4. 1 hour before baking, adjust oven rack with pizza stone to middle position and preheat oven to 500°F. Turn single dough ball out onto lightly flour surface. Gently press out dough into rough 8-inch circle, leaving outer 1-inch higher than the rest. Gently stretch dough by draping over knuckles into a 12 to 14-inch circle about 1/4-inch thick. Transfer to sheet pan or pizza peel/stone.

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Nothing to say about this crust except, yes, it’s perfect. I cut the salt to just one teaspoon, but otherwise followed it exactly. It definitely had a funky taste without enough salt, so maybe try 2t salt if you’re going for a lower-sodium adaptation. Otherwise, just keep it at the 3t from the original recipe.

Perfect for all your favorite pizzas.

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persian chopped salad

April 15, 2019

Shirazi salad, also known as Persian chopped salad, is an amazing bright, fresh, and summery vegan treat. It doesn’t get much healthier than this raw crunchy salad.

The only necessary ingredients here are a veggie or two, lemon or lime juice, and something herby. It’s too early in the season here for fresh garden herbs, but dry mint was great in this!

Chop any combination of the following:
raw fresh cucumbers
raw fresh tomatoes
raw onion
raw garlic
fresh hot chili pepper
fresh herbs like mint, parsley, or cilantro

Add chickpeas if you like. (I do!)

Dress with lemon or lime juice, and any combination of salt and pepper, dry or fresh mint, dry or fresh dill, and a splash of extra virgin olive oil.

(If you’re leaving out the fresh herbs, make sure to add extra citrus, and some dried herbs like dill-and-garlic seasoning or capitol hill blend!

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recipe adapted from a variety of sources, including Persian mama and Cleveland clinic.

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Similar to a fattoush or “Israeli salad” – this infinitely adaptable salad goes with everything. I highly recommend the chickpeas. Chickpeas add an interesting texture, and lots of protein and fiber!

If you like spicy, Sichuan cucumber salad is your best bet. But what if you want something clean and fresh, not doused in spicy oil? The dry mint in this recipe makes it super refreshing.

This is basically a textbook example of a “detox meal” – something that makes you feel alive again after a winter of eating junk food like super-greasy crispy fried tofu. Easy to make low-sodium, great for a potluck, and a great way to use local veggies from your backyard garden or your farmers’ market.

It doesn’t get much healthier than this!

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salt-free herb ranch seasoning

April 12, 2019

You’ll be surprised how often you find yourself using this savory herb blend. Of course it’s amazing mixed into plain yogurt or sour cream for a great dip. Yes, it’s fantastic sprinkled on pasta or pizza as a no-sodium umami boost. But then you will try it on popcorn. Sprinkled in the middle of a grilled cheese sandwich. On mashed potatoes. On roasted veggies. In your veggie/meat burgers. On fish. If you’re on a low sodium diet, this may quickly become one of your go-to seasoning blends.

The ranch I grew up with was mostly cheap soybean oil with an unbelievable amount of sugar and salt. The label’s serving size (two tablespoons of ranch) contains almost 300mg of sodium – that’s 20% of the salt someone with high blood pressure should eat for the entire day (source: ranch / American Heart Association)!! I grew up dipping my pizza crusts into that greasy sludge. If you think that’s what we’re making here, think again!

It reminds me of Capitol Hill seasoning (shallots, dill weed, parsley, chives, salt and pepper; all dried) – a perfect umami kick to top anything bland.

2 T dried parsley
2 t dried dill
2 t garlic powder
2 t onion powder
1 t dry flake onion
1 t black pepper
2 t dried chives
1 t oregano
buttermilk powder (optional. I hear this adds a great tang like a buttermilk ranch, but I left it out and it’s still great.)
(note to self: maybe try with dried orange or lemon zest next time to add the tang of buttermilk?)

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adapted from gimme some oven and from some other recipe I can no longer find rip

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Made this for the first time in early April, and by mid-April I already used almost an entire batch of this on everything from charred onion and cucumber salad to roasted potatoes to Persian chopped salad. Such a great springtime blend to add something different to your healthy diet!

Just one teaspoon of salt has 2300mg of sodium – that’s way more than people with high blood pressure are supposed to have over the course of a day (source : Harvard). Even though most people get most of their sodium from processed foods like frozen food and bread, it can be easy to go overboard on the salt shaker when you are cooking blander food like potatoes and rice. This is an awesome way to give you the flavor bomb you want while cutting back on your salt intake!

It doesn’t taste like the ranch you grew up with – if you want that, add cheap soybean oil, sugar, MSG, tons of salt, and egg yolks. Even if you hate ranch, give this a try! But if herbs aren’t your cup of tea, try some other salt-free spice blends from around the world!

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sichuan cucumber salad

April 9, 2019

perfect fresh, sour, crunchy foil to anything heavy. equally amazing served as a side with a rich pork meal (like dandanmian) – a crunchy topper for your salad – or just a mid-day snack.

smash or slice cucumbers into your favorite shape and size

top with any combination of the following:

– splash of sesame oil and/or hot chili oil (make your own with dry chilis and canola/veg oil, or use leftover dandanmian oil – easy substitution would be canola oil with a pinch of cayenne or hot sauce)
– splash of tamari or soy sauce
– pinch of sugar
– pinch of salt
– toasted Sichuan peppercorns
– splash of black vinegar (if you don’t have chinkiang vinegar, rice wine vinegar or apple cider will do)

if you want to get wild, add:
– pinch of toasted sesame seeds
– pinch of minced ginger and/or garlic

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adapted by friedsig from lots of sources, especially richard hsiao’s pickled cukes, but also China Sichuan food, appetite for China, and omnivore’s kitchen

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absolutely fantastic. perfect summery recipe. dare you not to eat the whole thing! it’s really more of a quick pickle than a salad, so let flavors absorb for at least an hour before eating (if you can resist the urge to eat it all immediately)

without question my best cucumber salad recipe besides fattoush and a plain-yogurt-and-dill thing i make in high summer. try this!!!