Archive for the ‘beef’ Category

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bobotie (south african curry meat casserole)

April 18, 2016

this is super sweet, with absolutely no processed sugars. if you like that kind of thing, it’s totally worth the effort this requires. it was one of my favorite meals when i first learned to cook, but i just made it tonight for the first time in many years. you can cut the sweetness by leaving out the raisins, and using the sourest apples you can find.

the meaty part comes out soft from the apples, and the topping is somewhere between a custard and fluffy scrambled eggs. if you are craving sweet takeout food, like general tso’s chicken or st. louis-style bbq, then you should give this a try instead.

my housemate dislikes apples, raisins, and sweet dinners, but he said this was delicious.

also, it’s extremely fun to say.

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minced lamb or beef, or a mixture of the two [the recipe doesn’t specify how much to use. i used one package, about 1.5 lbs raw]
butter, vegetable oil
2 onions, chopped
2 ml (1/2 teaspoon) crushed garlic
15 ml (1 tablespoon) curry powder
5 ml (1 teaspoon) ground turmeric
2 slices bread, crumbled
60 ml (1/4 cup) milk
finely grated rind and juice of 1/2 small lemon
1 egg
5 ml (1 teaspoon) salt, milled black pepper
100 g (3 ounces) dried apricots, chopped
1 Granny Smith apple peeled, cored and chopped
60 ml (1/4 cup) sultanas (golden raisins)
50 g (1 1/2 ounces) slivered almonds, roasted in a dry frying pan
6 lemon, orange, or bay leaves

TOPPING
250 ml (1 cup) milk
2 eggs
2 ml (1/2 teaspoon) salt

Set the oven at 160°C (325°F). Butter a large casserole. Heat butter and oil in a saucepan and fry the onion and garlic until translucent. Stir in the curry powder and turmeric, and cook briefly until fragrant. Remove the pot from the heat.
Mix in the (raw) minced meat. Mix together the crumbs, milk, lemon rind and juice, egg, salt, pepper, apricots, apple, sultanas (golden raisins) and almonds and mix in. Pile into the casserole and level the top. Roll up the leaves and bury them at regular intervals. Seal with foil and bake for 1 1/4 hours. Increase the oven temperature to 200°C (400°F). Mix together the topping milk, eggs and salt (you may require extra topping if you’ve used a very large casserole), pour over and bake uncovered for a further 15 minutes until cooked and lightly browned. Serve with yellow rice.

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from epicurious

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guinness beef stew with potatoes

February 7, 2016

not a bad way to spend a lazy cold weekend when you want the oven on all day. this soup is everything you are picturing – rich, hearty, and dark. it’s the only meaty dish dark enough to rival my vegan chipotle chocolate chili.

 

1 cup homemade chicken stock
1-3 lbs. boneless beef chuck roast, or any stew beef cut into smallish stew-y bits
3 large carrots, one just cut in half, and 2 cut into large dice
2 parsnips, one just cut in half, and one cut into large dice
8 oz – 1 lb small, waxy potatoes
4 peeled medium onions, 2 cut in half, and 2 cut into large dice
3 crushed cloves of garlic
1 oz bittersweet chocolate (about a small handful)
2 bottles or cans of dark, rich beer, like a stout or porter
sprigs of fresh thyme, parsley, and bay leaf (optional)
1 T fish sauce
1 T worcestershire sauce
1 T soy sauce
handful of flour
neutral veg oil, like canola
salt and pepper

preheat oven to 275. heat a dutch oven over medium-high heat on the stovetop, with a T or two of veg oil. wait til it’s hot. brown meat over a medium-high flame, about 10 min, turning regularly.

remove meat. add just the halved carrot, onion, and parsnip, along with garlic, and brown 4 min or so.

lower heat and add stock, beer, fish sauce, soy sauce, worcestershire, and herbs.

cut meat into stew-sized pieces and roll in flour. add to dutch oven, and bake the whole thing partially covered for 30 minutes. then stir, and bake for another 30 minutes.

then add potatoes and bake for another 30 minutes.

on the stovetop, saute the diced carrots, parsnips, and onions. skim any fat on top of the stew, and remove the herbs and the halved vegetables. add diced sauteed veggies to the stew and cook for an additional 45 minutes, or until everything is tender. the lid can be removed for the last 20 minutes.

garnish with parsley, or with sour cream, or hot sauce and tons of crusty bread.

 

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recipe by serious eats: serious eats guinness beef stew & adapted by sig at friedsig

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good, solid stew recipe, but boring enough that i got tired of it before it was gone. good for a “meat and potatoes” kind of person, but there was nothing super exciting about it to me, so i gave the rest to someone (who liked it a lot). maybe it needs something sour to cut the heartiness a little? it smelled great as it was cooking, though, and was really not bad at all.

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jamaican oxtail stew

July 10, 2014

this is the other recipe i’m excited about from lobel’s meat bible by stanley, evan, david, and mark lobel.

1/2 medium red onion, chopped
8 scallions, 6 chopped and two thinly sliced for garnish
8 large cloves garlic, sliced
3 scotch bonnet or habanero peppers, halved, stemmed, and seeded (haha, i used 1)
one 1 1/2 in knob fresh ginger, peeled and sliced
5 medium celery ribs
2 T ground allspice
2 t black pepper
2 T fresh thyme leaves
1/4 c soy sauce
starch, like corn or potato (for dredging – optional)
salt
oil
5 lb oxtail, cut crosswise into 1 in thick pieces
4 oz thick country-style bacon
2 medium yellow onions, chopped
3 medium carrots, peeled and sliced
1 lb dried or 2 15-oz cans prepared butter beans, lima beans, fava beans, or pigeon peas
2 T unsalted butter

in a food processor, combine red onion, scallions, garlic, peppers, ginger, 1 rib celery, allspice, pepper, thyme, soy sauce, 1 T of salt, and 2 T oil. process 20 – 30 seconds.

dredge oxtail in corn starch. shake off excess. heat 1/4 c oil over medium-high and brown oxtail 12-15 minutes per batch. watch for burning.

pour paste over oxtail and leave to marinate overnight.

let oxtail come to room temp > 1 h. cook bacon in a little oil on low heat. raise heat to medium and add onion. cook 8 – 10 mins. add oxtail and all of the marinade, stir in 6 1/2 c water, and bring to a simmer over high heat, skimming fat but not spice paste. reduce heat to low, cover, and cook at the barest possible simmer until meat is tender, about 3 1/2 h.

turn off heat and rest stew for 5 m, uncovered. skim fat. add carrots and celery. simmer on medium-low for 1 h.

stir in beans and continue simmering 15 – 30 m or until slightly thickened.

turn off heat, add butter and salt.

serve with white rice, scallions to garnish, and lime wedges

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from lobel’s meat bible by stanley, evan, david, and mark lobel.

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update january 2015:
couldn’t find oxtail, so i’m using beef stew meat. the marinade smells incredible. it’s marinating now, so i’ll let you know what happens.

update february 2016
oops. i never updated that. and i have no memory of making this last year. awesome. well, my oxtails were disgusting and rotten, so i used 2 lbs of pork, instead, and marinated it for almost 24 hours because it was weird old sale pork. the weird old sale pork turned out to be really tender (possibly because of the 24 hour marination.) however, this recipe really didn’t stand out like i thought it would. maybe it’s because of the shortcuts i used, and the quality of the ingredients – dried thyme for fresh, old allspice berries, no celery, etc. either way, it was pretty bland and uninspiring. the broth is good – nice and gingery – but the meat itself just tastes like regular old meat. i am sure that using 3 habaneros would completely change the equation, as well as some great, fresh ingredients. not a bad recipe by any means, but not my new go-to recipe.

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beer-marinated skirt steak

April 13, 2013

1 orange, thinly sliced with peel
1/2 onion, thinly sliced
4 garlic cloves, halved and smashed
2 1/4 pounds skirt steak
Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper
1 cup beer (light or amber)
1/2 cup tamari or soy sauce

In a wide, shallow glass baking dish, scatter half of the orange slices, half of the onion slices and half of the garlic pieces on the bottom of the dish. Sprinkle the steak all over with salt and pepper and put in the dish on top of the orange and onion slices. Scatter the remaining orange, onion and garlic over the steak and pour in the beer and soy sauce. Lid or cover with plastic wrap and marinate overnight in the refrigerator.

Prepare a barbecue on medium-high heat or preheat a broiler. Remove the meat from the marinade and discard the marinade. Grill the steak to desired doneness, about 4 minutes per side for medium-rare.

turn into tacos or whatever you like

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adapted from here

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kimchi bokkeumbap (bulgogi and kim chi fried rice)

February 4, 2013

cooking a lot of korean food lately. can’t wait to try this!

BULGOGI

1 pound of beef tenderloin, sliced thinly into pieces ½ inch x 2 inches and ⅛ inch thick
(or 1 lb mushrooms for a vegetarian version)

Marinade (for 1 pound of beef):

½ cup of crushed pear
¼ cup onion purée
4 cloves of minced garlic
1 chopped green onion
2 tbs soy sauce
2 tbs brown sugar (or 1 tbs of brown sugar and 1½ tbs rice syrup) (optional; the pear is so sweet!)
a pinch of ground black pepper
1 tbs toasted sesame oil
several thin slices of carrot

Add the beef to the marinade and keep in the fridge at least 30 minutes. If your cut of beef is tough, you can marinate longer to soften it.
Cook it on a pan or a grill, and transfer to a plate or a cast iron plate to serve.
Sprinkle chopped green onion and toasted sesame seeds over top.

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kim chi fried rice

3 bowls overnight cold rice
1 cup ripe kimchi (including juice)
200g pork belly (3 layer pork)
1/2 medium onion, sliced
1/4 medium green capsicum, diced
1/4 medium red capsicum, diced
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 teaspoon gochujang (Korean chili paste; add more if you prefer spicy)
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil
3 tablespoons cooking oil
dash of black pepper
1 spring onions, chopped
eggs

1. Fry eggs sunny side up in oil. Set aside.

2. Add oil in a wok and saute onions until translucent.

3. Add garlic and pork belly and cook thoroughly.

4. Once pork is cooked, add red and green capsicum.

5. Add gochujang and kimchi. Stir-fry for a minute.

6. Add rice, soy sauce and kimchi juice. Stir to combine well.

7. Lastly add sesame oil and dash of black pepper. Serve topped with fried egg, spring onions, and shredded seaweed or seaweed rice seasoning.

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adapted from maangchi and messywitchen

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totally delicious! the pear adds such a great sweetness to the meat. recommended!

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sop buntut (indonesian oxtail soup)

December 6, 2012

2 1/2 pounds oxtails, cut into sections at the vertebrae
3 quarts water
1 2-inch piece of ginger, peeled and bruised
1 piece cinnamon stick
7 cloves
1 whole nutmeg, cracked into several pieces
1 tsp black pepper, freshly ground
1 TBS sugar
2 tsp salt
3-4 carrots, peeled and sliced on the diagonal about 1/4-inch thick
3-4 yukon gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
1–2 ripe tomatoes, sliced into wedges
1 stalk of Chinese celery (seledri), finely chopped
2 green onions, white part only, thinly sliced
2 TBS fried shallots
2 TBS fried garlic slices
peanut or vegetable oil for frying the potatoes

In a large soup pot, bring the oxtails and water to a steady boil over high heat. Use a spoon or a fine mesh skimmer to skim off any foam that rises to the surface. After you have removed as much foam as possible, reduce the heat to medium-low and add the ginger. Cover and simmer for about an hour.

Next, add the spices, including the sugar and salt, to the pot and continue to simmer, covered, for another 30–45 minutes. The meat should be just beginning to come away from the bones. Taste the broth and add salt to taste.

While the broth simmers, prepare the carrots and potatoes. Bring a medium-sized saucepan of water to a boil. Add the carrots and boil until just tender, two to three minutes. Drain them in a colander and rinse with cold water.

Lightly fry the potatoes until they are light brown. They should be just cooked through the center. Drain on paper towels.

To serve, place some oxtail, carrots, and potatoes in a bowl. Ladle in some hot broth. Top with some wedges of ripe tomato. Sprinkle with the fried shallots, fried slices of garlic, sliced green onion, and chopped Chinese celery.

Serve with rice and sambal. Emping melinjo (melinjo crackers) are a nice accompaniment.

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from javaholic

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trinidadian vegan (or fishy) pastelles

October 5, 2012

To prepare fig leaves (or corn husks), steam them in a large pot of boiling water for ten minutes until they become pliable and soft. They may also be softened by waving them over an open flame. You can also use sheets of tin foil.

Cornmeal dough and pastelle assembly

Ingredients

2 cups yellow cornmeal
3 cups hot water
1/2 cup butter (or lard)
1 1/4 tsp salt

1. In a food processor or by hand, combine cornmeal with butter and salt.
2. Add water and process to make a soft, pliable dough.
3. Divide the dough into 12 balls. Cover with a damp cloth to prevent drying.
4. Place one piece of dough on a greased fig leaf and press into an eight-inch square.
5. Spoon two tablespoons of filling onto the middle of the dough and fold and seal pastelles.
6. Wrap in fig leaf and tie into a neat package. (you can also use foil)
7. Steam pastelles for 45 minutes until cooked.

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Sarina’s Vegan Sweet Potato Pastelles

Ingredients:
2 1/2 cups finely grated sweet potato
2 medium-large onions, minced
1 cup chopped chives
2 pimento peppers, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon dried thyme
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 tsp salt

1 tablespoon olive oil

3 tablespoons chopped olives
1/4 cup raisins

1/4 cup water
3 tablespoons margarine
1 tablespoon browning
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 tablespoon tomato paste

1. Combine first 8 ingredients (sweet potato through salt) in large mixing bowl.
2. Heat olive oil over medium heat
3. Add potato mixture, sauté for 5 minutes.
4. Turn off heat
5. Add water, margarine, browning, brown sugar and tomato paste.
6. Stir to combine.
7. Add raisins and olives.
8. Stir to combine.
9. Taste and adjust seasonings (especially salt and pepper) to suit.
10. Proceed to fill pastelles as above

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fish, chicken, or beef pastelles

1 lb chopped beef, chicken, fish, or a combination
2 onions, finely chopped
2 tbs olive oil
1 cup chopped chives
1/4 cup chopped fresh thyme
2 pimento peppers, chopped
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1 tbs chopped celery
1/2 Congo pepper, seeded and chopped (optional)
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 tsp salt
1/4 cup tomato sauce
4 tbs capers
3 tbs stuffed olives, sliced
1/4 cup raisins
2 tbs fresh thyme

1. Combine beef with chicken. Add salt and black pepper.
2. Add a quarter-cup chopped chives and one tablespoon thyme.
3. In a large saute pan heat olive oil.
4. Add onion and garlic. Saute until fragrant.
5. Add pimento peppers, remaining chive, pepper and thyme.
6. Add meat and cook until brown.
7. Add tomato sauce, cover and simmer for about 15 minutes.
8. Add raisins, capers and olives and stir to combine.
9. Cook for about five minutes more. Taste and adjust seasoning.
10. Add two tablespoons fresh thyme and stir to combine.

11. Remove from heat and cool.
12. Prepare dough as in recipe above and fill and fold pastelles as indicated.

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recipe from trini gourmet