Posts Tagged ‘vegetarian’


moroccan roasted vegetable soup

March 14, 2018

just adding this one ingredient (ras-el-hanout – a moroccan spice blend that’s complex and amazing) to a basic roasted vegetable soup is a total game-changer.


roast one full cookie sheet of chopped veggies (I did carrots, parsnips, sweet potatoes, red potatoes, whole cloves of garlic, and butternut squash) coated in olive oil

roast an onion, too, or chop it raw and saute it in a soup pot or dutch oven.

when soft, add the roasted veggie chunks and a bunch of stock or broth of some kind, whatever you have in the house. also add ras-el-hanout to taste. the original recipe calls for a tablespoon, but my blend is very spicy with tons of cayenne, and barely a teaspoonful was enough.

when everything is totally soft, after simmering for a while, blend the soup and serve.

you can top with plain yogurt, and/or fresh mint.


adapted by friedsig from the bbc


almost exactly the same as the vegetable soup i normally make, but the simple addition of ras el hanout makes it taste totally new again. if you’re bored of the same old veggie soup you always make, definitely give this a try! i always make curried red lentil and squash soup, but coconut milk is getting really pricey, and this is a great alternative!

this is one of my newest vegan soup favorites. i will 100% be making this again soon.


vegetarian buffalo “meatballs”

February 18, 2018

1 to 2 garlic cloves
1 (15-ounce) can white beans, rinsed, drained
1 package mushrooms
1 large egg
1 cup breadcrumbs, panko, pretzel crumbs, etc.
1 celery stalk (optional)
1 teaspoon kosher salt, less if using seasoned breadcrumbs (recipe called for 1t but next time i will cut it in half)

1 tablespoon unsalted butter
a ton of vinegar-based hot pepper sauce, like buffalo sauce, tabasco, or frank’s, to taste
a dash of pure maple syrup (optional)

1/4 – 1/2 cup plain yogurt or sour cream
a splash of kefir or buttermilk, to thin
half a package crumbled blue cheese
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon chopped chives

Preheat to 400°F. Oil a baking sheet or use a silpat.
Pulse garlic in a food processor until finely chopped, or chop by hand. Add celery, beans, and mushrooms and pulse until coarsely chopped, or chop by hand and mash beans coarsely with hands in a bowl. Transfer to a large bowl. Stir in egg, panko, and 3/4 tsp. salt. Using your hands, roll tablespoonfuls of bean mixture into balls. Transfer to prepared baking sheet, packing them snugly. Roast veggie balls, turning halfway through, until firm and cooked through, 25–30 minutes.
Meanwhile, cook butter, hot sauce, and maple syrup in a small saucepan over medium heat until butter is melted. Stir until smooth; set aside.
Whisk sour cream, buttermilk, blue cheese, pepper, 1 Tbsp. plus 2 tsp. chives, and remaining 1/4 tsp. salt in a medium bowl. Top with remaining 1 tsp. chives.
Transfer veggie balls to a large bowl. Toss with hot sauce mixture and serve with blue cheese dip alongside.


adapted from epicurious


couldn’t shake a craving for buffalo wings, so i went for this. the dip is nothing new, but the veggie meatballs are a new recipe for me. i was surprised how well they stayed together – even though they did stick to the pan when i reheated them, they still stayed partially assembled. the texture is not meaty, and does suffer from a bit of the mush factor, but the mushrooms help to give it a little more bite, so it’s overall less mushy than other veggie burger recipes i have tried. there is something novel and fun about the “meatball” style, but it’s something i might try in lazy “veggie burger” form next time. i’ll make these again when i am craving restaurant-style junk food.


panchkuti dal (savory indian lentils)

January 28, 2018

a great savory vegan lentil dish from rajasthan. some people find my favorite gujarati dal too sweet and sour, and dal makhani too heavy. if that sounds like you, and you like something simple and hearty without sugar or cream, try this panchkuti dal. the combination of lentils works really well to set it apart, even though the spice blend reminds me a lot of other northern dal dishes, like dal from nearby punjab. i’ll make this panchkuti dal, also called panchmel dal or panchratan dal or just rajasthani dal, for my vegan or health-conscious friends – it’s one of my favorite lentil recipes with no cream, butter, sugar, or ghee. check out over thirty bean and lentil recipes right here.


2 tbsp chilkewale urad dal (split black lentils)
2 tbsp toovar (arhar) dal
2 tbsp green moong dal (split green gram)
2 tbsp chana dal (split bengal gram)
2 tbsp masoor dal (split red lentil)
2 tbsp oil
2 tsp mustard seeds ( rai / sarson)
2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera)
about an inch of cinnamon (dalchini)
4 tsp finely chopped garlic (lehsun)
4 tsp finely chopped ginger (adrak)
2 whole dry kashmiri red chillies , broken into pieces
8 curry leaves (kadi patta)
1 bay leaf
pinch of amchur (green mango powder)
1/2 cup chopped tomatoes
1 tsp garam masala
1 tbsp finely chopped coriander (dhania)
0 to 4 minced fresh green chilis
salt to taste
2 tbsp lemon juice


cook dal by simmering in twice its volume in liquid (i just used a cup as a guide)

or tarladalal recommends, “Wash all the dals and soak them in enough water in a bowl for 1 hour. Drain. Combine the soaked dals with 1 cup of water in a pressure cooker and pressure cook for 3 whistles. Allow the steam to escape before opening the lid. Keep aside.”

in a separate pan, heat oil and add the whole mustard and cumin seeds.
When the seeds crackle, add the cinnamon, garlic, ginger, red chillies and bay and curry leaves and sauté on a medium flame for 1 to 2 minutes.
Add the tomatoes and amchur, and cook over a medium flame for 1 to 2 minutes.
Add the garam masala and green chillies, mix well and cook over a medium flame for 1 minute.
Add the cooked dal, salt and lemon juice, mix well and cook on a medium flame for 5 to 7 minutes, while stirring occasionally.
Serve hot. Top with cilantro leaves and plain yogurt.


recipe adapted from tarladalal and archana’s kitchen


(if you don’t have all five kinds of split lentils and peas, just use a combination of anything you have in the house! just make sure to cook whole lentils separately from split peas and lentils – they have a different cook time.)


black forest sweet and sour red cabbage

January 11, 2018

My mom and Oma were born in the southwestern part of Germany, near the Black Forest. You can find other Schwäbische Rezepte if you click here. Just realized I never put this recipe on here – wild, because it’s one of the only cabbage recipes I love. Cabbage is not my favorite vegetable, but the acidity in this recipe cooks out the farty taste.

Heat oil or fat in a pot or Dutch oven. If you’re vegan, try coconut oil. I like using leftover chicken fat or lard.

Dice an onion and a sour apple, like a Granny Smith. Finely chop a small head of red cabbage.

Caramelize the onion in a pot or Dutch oven. When almost done, add the cabbage. Saute together for a few minutes.

Add stock (I like vegetable or chicken stock,) the diced apple, a few juniper berries if you have them, a bay leaf, maybe a whole clove or two, and a healthy amount of red wine. (If you can’t have wine, try apple cider vinegar mixed with vegetable stock.) I like a pinch of brown sugar in this, but it’s optional.

You want to braise it in the liquid, so you may have to add liquid as it evaporates. Simmer, stirring regularly, until the cabbage looks cooked and has lost its crunch.

You can also do this in a crock-pot or instant pot. Just caramelize the onions on the stove top for flavor.

It’s great in its vegan form. You can also start with bacon, and caramelize the onions in the bacon grease. Just add the cooked bacon back in at the end.


recipe by my oma and mom


puliyodharai / puliogare (tamarind rice)

December 17, 2017

This rice recipe from Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, and other parts of southern India, is the perfect fancy vegan dish for your next special occasion. It is a temple dish, offered as prasāda, or an offering to a deity.


cook a cup of rice as you normally would. use sesame oil instead of butter – about a tablespoon. when it’s done, add a quarter-teaspoon of turmeric and take off the heat.

for the spice blend, toast the following in an ungreased skillet:

dried red chilis (4 if you’re Indian, 3 if you like it very hot, 2 for medium-hot, and 1 for mild)
2 t whole coriander
1 t chana dal or yellow split peas or split chickpeas, and 1 t urad dal or split black dal
1/2 t whole sesame seeds
1/4 t each whole fenugreek and whole black pepper

when golden brown, crush these ingredients in a mortar and pestle or spice grinder, along with a pinch of asafoetida if you have it.

set aside this ground spice mixture.

now bust out a big skillet or dutch oven. you will be tempering more spices in here.

heat 3 T sesame oil in the pan. when shimmering and hot, add 1 t urad dal and 1 t black mustard seeds, 1 t chana dal, and 1/4 t peanuts. when golden, add more dry chilis if you like, ten curry leaves, and 1/4 t turmeric. you can add a pinch of asafoetida here if you have it. add tamarind to taste – i used a few spoonfuls of paste mixed with about a cup of water – or you can use 50g of dried tamarind and soak for about a half-hour. salt the mixture. add a pinch of sugar or jaggery if you like. simmer until the mixture reduces a bit and looks saucy. add the ground spice mixture and stir well until it starts to smell incredible. add the cooked rice, stir, and serve.


based on recipes from veg recipes of india and padhu’s kitchen


The flavors are unbelievably good. Since it has so much flavor, it’s great served with something a little bland – we had vegan stewed red cabbage with red wine. The sourness of the rice went perfectly with the cabbage. One of my new favorite vegan side dishes!


don’t use IPAs in your honey beer bread (and how to save your bread if you do)

March 4, 2017

a basic, six-ingredient quickbread – no breadmaking experience, no yeast, no kneading – just hot, fresh bread that anyone could make in less than an hour!

honey beer bread

3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup honey (or 2T sugar and 2T honey)
1 bottle (12 ounces) beer (not an IPA!)
4 tablespoons (half stick) butter, melted

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease a 9 x 5 x 3-inch bread pan.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt until combined. Slowly pour the beer and honey into the flour mixture, and stir until combined. (If the honey is too solid, you can put the glass jar into a small saucepan with a little water to soften the honey, or microwave it!)

Pour half of the melted butter into the bottom of the loaf pan, and tilt the pan around until a layer of butter covers the sides and bottom of the pan. Then add the batter to the pan in an even layer, and brush the rest of the butter around evenly on top of the batter.

Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, until the top of the bread is golden brown and a toothpick or knife inserted in the middle comes out clean. Serve immediately.


from gimme some oven


Don’t use a super-bitter IPA – the bread will turn out extremely bitter! If you make this mistake, though, it’s easy to fix – just eat it with a sweet spread! The sweetness cuts the bitterness. Try jam, nutella, sweetened peanut butter, or maple syrup. If you want a fancy spread to cut the bitterness, you can mix honey, maple syrup, or sugar into anything from cream cheese to mashed-up avocado. You can even mix maple syrup or honey into softened butter for some fancy “maple butter” or “honey butter” – it’s perfect on bread and you’ll find plenty of other uses for it, too. If you’re watching your sugar, make sure to use a mild beer – nothing too hoppy. A cheap beer works great for beer bread. If you used a mild beer, you can top this bread with anything from hummus to deli meats, just like any other bread. Enjoy!


chinese sesame paste dressing

January 9, 2017

trying to get some vegetables back into my diet… salads last week with marinated mushrooms and balsamic vinaigrette were great, so this week maybe i’ll toss some cucumbers and radishes in this for lunch.


this recipe is from the book phoenix claws and jade trees by kian lam kho


2 T chinese toasted sesame paste* + 2 T water
1 t toasted sesame oil
1 t chile oil (optional)
1 t white rice vinegar
1 large clove or 2 small cloves garlic
1/2 t salt
1/2 t sugar

stir together and let sit at least ten minutes before using

* = i don’t have this but omnivore’s cookbook suggested 1 part tahini, 1 part peanut butter, and a drizzle of toasted sesame oil as a substitution


modified from the highly recommended cookbook phoenix claws and jade trees by kian lam kho


fantastic – fast and easy peanut sauce with a great sesame flavor