Posts Tagged ‘vegetarian’

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irish oatmeal soda bread

January 27, 2016

this completes a trinity of irish soda breads.

between this irish oatmeal soda bread, this savory rosemary soda bread, and this sweet soda bread with raisins, you can please anyone.

this one’s right in the middle. it’s by far the most neutral of the three. it doesn’t have as much of the characteristic “irish soda bread” flavor as the other two. it’s just a good quick bread to whip up and occupy the second rack when you’re roasting vegetables or meat.

& since it’s a soda bread, you don’t need yeast, and you don’t have to wait for anything to rise. just mix the ingredients with your hands, and plop it on a cookie sheet. super easy. my housemate really liked this one, but i thought it was too dense. i just wonder if 375 is the right temp for my oven – the crumb came out doughy and glutinous. or did i overmix it? or does it need more baking soda? it calls for a third of the baking soda of the rosemary brown butter bread. any suggestions?

 

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4 cups all purpose flour
1/3 cup old fashioned oats {plus more for sprinkling}
2 tbsp sugar
1 tsp baking soda
4 tbsp cold butter, cut into small chunks
1 ½ tsp salt
1 ¾ cups well-shaken buttermilk or homemade kefir
1 egg, lightly beaten

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, oats, baking soda, sugar and salt. Cut the butter into the dry ingredients with your fingers until no more large clumps exist.
Combine the lightly beaten egg with the buttermilk. Pour into dry ingredients and mix. Dough will be wet!
Using wet hands, form a large shaggy ball of dough and place on a parchment paper lined sheet tray. Cut an “x” in the center of the loaf with a knife and sprinkle oats on top.
Bake for 50 minutes, until golden brown. Let cool for 10 minutes before slicing.

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from pbs

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borar jhaal (bengali lentil balls in mustard sauce)

January 23, 2016

1/2 c urad dal, rinsed (also called “black lentils”)
1-4 green chilis (recipe called for 4, which seems painful)
1/2 t sugar
1/2 t ginger paste
pinch of asafoetida or onion/garlic power

1 t nigella seed
salt

sauce:
1 t black mustard seed
1 t yellow mustard seed
0-2 green chilis
1 t sugar

soak dal for 30 minutes
drain; put in blender with salt, ginger, chilis, and sugar, & blend
roll into 12 balls & squeeze out water
fry in 1 c mustard oil for 5 minutes – make sure to wait til the oil is sizzling before frying them!
drain on paper towels or paper bags.

separately, mix up the sauce with a little water

heat 3 T oil in a pan & add nigella seed, stir-fry 1 min
add mustard sauce, simmer 10 min
add fried balls & remove from heat

 

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from Mark’s book about Indian cooking

 

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the sauce is not really a sauce. i may not have copied this down correctly. it’s kind of just mustardy water. maybe my mustard seeds are old? balls of fried lentil are always good but i might recommend fermenting it and doing some vadai or some dosai instead of this. i do really like the nigella seed infused oil – i might try that with dal some time.

if you really want to try this, i would say, remember to only add water a bit at a time into the blender. i got the texture right (for once) and the balls held together, but it’s a delicate balance, and many times my vadai came out unfryable (unfriable?)

also just skip the sauce and fry them in nigella seed and mustard seed.

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nasu dengaku (japanese miso eggplant)

January 19, 2016
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

NASU DENGAKU

here is a recipe from otaku food!

Ingredients

  • 1 small eggplant, or 2 Japanese eggplants
  • 1/4 cup dashi
  • 1 tablespoon mirin
  • 1 tablespoon sake
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon miso
  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • Chopped green onion and sesame seed for garnish

Quick Directions

  1. Slice eggplant in half, then cut the surface in a criss cross pattern.
  2. Brush the surface with oil, then bake at 350 degrees for 30 to 45 minutes until the eggplant is tender.
  3. Bring dashi, mirin, sake and sugar and bring to a gentle boil. Add miso and whisk to blend. Remove from heat.
  4. Remove eggplant from oven, then turn the broiler on. Brush eggplant with sauce, and sprinkle with sesame.
  5. Broil for a few minutes until the sauce has caramelized. Remove from oven and garnish with green onion.

check out the whole site at otaku food for great info about how it’s usually “grilled and roasted over the fire” in the summer at barbecues!

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don’t have dashi on hand? here’s a recipe i modified from fat-free vegan. sounds very sweet but very amazing!

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons mirin
  • 2 tablespoons sake (may substitute stock with dry vermouth or white wine)
  • 4 tablespoons mellow white miso
  • 1 tablespoon sugar or agave nectar
  • 4 Japanese eggplants, stem end trimmed and cut in half lengthwise
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil (optional)
  • toasted sesame seeds, for garnish
  • sliced green onions, for garnish

Instructions

  1. Place the mirin and sake in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Simmer for about 2 minutes to allow some of the alcohol to cook off. Then add the miso and stir until smooth. Stir in the agave nectar, reduce the heat to very low, and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, while you broil the eggplants:
  2. Brush the cut sides of the eggplants with the sesame oil, if desired. Put the eggplants cut-side down on a baking sheet and place under the broiler of your oven for about 3 minutes, checking often to make sure that they do not burn. Turn them over, and cook for another 3 minutes or until the tops are a light to medium brown. Do not burn! (If your eggplant still isn’t tender all the way through, try baking it–no broiler–a few more minutes; then proceed with the recipe.)
  3. When the eggplants are tender, top each one with the miso sauce and put them back under the broiler until the sauce bubbles up–this should take less than a minute, so watch them closely. Serve hot, sprinkled with toasted sesame seeds and green onions.+

    from fat-free vegan and adapted by friedsig

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update 1/31/16… here’s what ended up happening:
1 medium eggplant
1/2 c homemade chicken stock simmered for a few minutes with seaweed & strained
2 T white wine
1 t sesame oil
1/2 t. la jiao jiang (I know it isn’t Japanese, but I love this stuff!)
2 t sugar
1 T miso

cut eggplant in half, score tops and brush with olive oil, and bake at 350 til soft.

simmer all ingredients together for a few minutes except miso. turn off heat. add miso.

if your miso and stock and la are salty, you shouldn’t need to add salt at all.

pour over eggplants & broil for about 5 minutes.

I added too much stock, as you can see from the photo. A half-cup is too much for the sauce to caramelize. It’s not very photogenic, but it tastes amazing. I will try this again with actual mirin and sake. Next time, I will cut down on the sugar and the stock. Highly recommended!

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rasse misse rajma (punjabi kidney beans)

January 15, 2016

1 1/3 c dry kidney beans
4 black cardamom pods
2 bay leaves
1 t. ground coriander
1 t chili powder
7 T. ghee
4 dry red chili
1 1/2 t. cumin seed
an onion, chopped
5 t ginger paste
5 t garlic paste
2 small pureed tomatoes
1 t ground black cardamom
1/2 t black pepper

soak beans overnight & simmer with whole cardamom and bay for 1.5 hours

in bowl, add coriander, chili, salt, and 4 T water

heat ghee over a medium flame.

add chilis and cumin and stir-fry 1 minute

add onion, fry 5 mins

add ginger and garlic, fry 2-3 min

add ground spiced & stir-fry 30 seconds

add tomatoes and fry 5 mins til oil separates

add beans & simmer 7 mins

remove from heat. serve with chopped fresh cilantro.

 

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from Mark’s book on Indian cooking

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strawberry dressing

January 10, 2016

maybe you are in a part of the world that isn’t frozen – or maybe you’re reading this in the heat of the summer.

this will be an attempt to:
1. break the monotony of my favorite dressings that i can’t stop making
2. bring a little summer to this wildly cold day

also a great way to use up the strawberries in your garden or fridge that are right on the edge of too soft to eat.

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a cup of strawberries, or however many you have
1/3 c olive oil, or other nice dressing oil, like walnut
1 tsp balsamic, or to taste
a squeeze of fresh lemon juice
a pinch of salt

blend til smooth

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from just one cookbook

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quick balsamic vinaigrette

September 29, 2015

I know the world of salad dressing is a lot bigger than classic honey mustard (I do equal parts honey, mustard, oil, and lemon juice) but I always have diy honey mustard ready to use in the fridge, so I never branch out. This week is all about new dressing!

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Essential Balsamic

1/4 c balsamic vinegar
2 t mustard
1 t brown sugar (opt.)
1/2 t kosher or sea salt
1/4 t black pepper
1/4 clove to 1 clove crushed garlic
1/2c – 3/4c olive oil, depending on how vinegary you like it

put all ingredients in a small jar and shake the daylights out of it

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Creamy Balsamic  (really awesome)
make recipe as above, but add 2 T mayonnaise. doesn’t taste mayonnaisey at all – just creamy, sweet, and sour.

Blueberry Balsamic (also really awesome)
make recipe as above, but add a few dried blueberries, crushed fresh blueberries, or a teaspoon of blueberry jam

Strawberry Balsamic
you get the idea, right?

Blackberry Balsamic
mmm

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This is my new favorite dressing. I had it on a salad of spicy greens from the farmers market with sweet grapes, dried blueberries, and cashews. Amazing!

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from inspired taste

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baharat (middle eastern spice mix)

August 24, 2015

another variation of bokharat

1 dried chili
1 T + 1/2tsp coriander
1 T + 1 3/4tsp cumin
2 1/2tsp ground allspice
1 1/4tsp white pepper
1/2tsp ground turmeric
2 1/2tsp of sweet spice mix

preheat oven to 375. crack dried chili and shake out the seeds. roast deseeded chili, and the whole coriander and cumin seeds, for 6 min. cool, crumble/grind, mix with ground spices, and store in airtight container.

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from Honey & Co. The Cookbook by Itamar Srulovich and Sarit Packer

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