Archive for the ‘pork’ Category

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dan dan noodles (dandanmian)

December 10, 2016

i can’t stop eating these noodles because they taste so good.

but, i can’t stop crying.

they’re so, so spicy.

did you ever make something that tasted so good despite it being too spicy, but you were determined to power through it, and you ended up with tears streaming down your face?

that’s me today.

this chili oil is great – a nice change of pace from la jiao jiang with sichuan flavors like star anise and cinnamon.

sichuan dishes heavy on the peppercorns are known as “numbing” – and this one is ~definitely~ numbing. as in, my mouth is completely numb and tingly… and i keep going back for more.

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i modified this recipe from woks of life. one of the main and most important parts of dan dan noodles are the pickled chinese mustard greens. it’s not really dan dan noodles without sui mi ya cai. so, maybe i should call this something different, because i didn’t use any. don’t fear if you can’t get them – these noodles are amazing even without the greens. next time i’ll plan this a little better and get some sui mi ya cai… or at least get some bok choy to get some nutrients in there and, and to help cool the fire. and a larger bottle of antacids.

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MAKE THE CHILI OIL
2 tablespoons Sichuan peppercorns
1 inch-long piece of Chinese cinnamon (gui-pi) [i used whatever cinnamon i have]
2 star anise
1 cup oil
1/4 cup crushed red pepper flakes

In a small pot, add the Sichuan peppercorns, cinnamon stick, star anise, and oil. Over medium low heat, slowly heat to 325 degrees Fahrenheit, and then turn off the heat. Wait 6-7 minutes, then remove the peppercorns, cinnamon stick, and star anise with a slotted spoon.
Add the crushed red pepper flakes and allow them to steep in the hot oil. It should start smelling fragrant, almost like popcorn. Allow the oil to cool. This makes more chili oil than you’ll need, but you’ll be glad to have it on hand for use in other dishes. Store in a glass jar and keep refrigerated.

MAKE THE MEAT
3 teaspoons oil
8 oz. ground pork
2 teaspoons sweet bean sauce or hoisin sauce
2 teaspoons shaoxing wine (or cooking sherry)
1 teaspoon dark soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon five spice powder
1/3 cup sui mi ya cai (i left this out)

In a wok, heat a teaspoon of oil over medium heat, and brown the ground pork. Cook til partially crispy.

Add the sweet bean sauce, shaoxing wine, dark soy sauce, and five spice powder. Cook until all the liquid is evaporated. Set aside. Heat the other 2 teaspoons of oil in the wok over medium heat, and sautee the sui mi ya ci (pickled vegetables) for a few minutes. Set aside.

MAKE THE SAUCE
2 tablespoons sesame paste (tahini)
3 tablespoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons sugar
1/4 teaspoon five spice powder
1/2 teaspoon Sichuan peppercorn powder (we ground whole Sichuan peppercorns in a mortar and pestle)
1/2 cup of your prepared chili oil [HEY IF YOU ARE USING 9 OZ OF PASTA PLEASE DON’T USE A HALF-CUP UNLESS YOU LIKE THINGS VERY, VERY HOT, MAYBE USE LESS THAN HALF, SERIOUSLY THIS CHILI OIL CAME OUT SO, SO HOT]
2 cloves garlic, very finely minced
¼ cup hot cooking water from the noodles

Mix together all the ingredients. Taste and adjust seasoning if you like.

PUT IT TOGETHER
cook about a pound of cu mian (Shanghai-style noodle,) fresh soft medium-thickness white noodles from an Asian marketplace, or udon noodles. Don’t forget the cooking water for the sauce! Steam bok choy or whatever other greens you have. Grab your bowl and add sauce to the bottom, then noodles, then greens and pork. Top with scallions, and peanuts that you fried up in some oil.

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modified from the woks of life

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may end up adding this to the “favorites” list after i make it a few more times with so, so, so much less chili oil. and so much less heartburn.

tastes like something magical, just as it sounds – sweet, very hot, lots of textures – just what street food should be!

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Hong You Chao Shou (sichuan pork wontons)

February 27, 2014

After I made la jiao jiang hot pepper oil, I started putting the caramelized onions on everything from bleu cheese potatoes to pizza. I wondered, though – what do people in the Sichuan province put their chili oil on?

Found this recipe on red shallot kitchen. It was my first time working with wonton wrappers. They are quite easy to use. I bet these would be fantastic vegan or vegetarian – stewed cabbage, spiced tofu, or anything could go inside these slippery dumplings.

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1 1/2 pounds ground pork (with about 20% fat. Do not use lean pork)
1 egg
1 inch fresh ginger, finely minced
8 garlic cloves, finely minced
2 tablespoons chinese rice wine, or dry sherry
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon chicken bouillon (optional)
Salt and white pepper
40 wonton wrappers (3 1/2-inch or 4-inch square)
4 tablespoons soy sauce
1/4 cup Sichuan chili oil (Hong You)
4 tablespoons chinese black rice vinegar (also called Chinkiang/Zenjiang vinegar)
2 scallions, chopped

In a large bowl, mix pork, egg, ginger, half of minced garlic, rice wine, sesame oil, chicken bouillon, salt and pepper until well blended. Lay out one wonton wrapper on a plate, place one heaping teaspoon of pork filling in the center of the wrapper. Brush the edges with water, fold the wrapper diagonally so it forms a triangle. Take 2 opposite corner and overlap each other, using a little bit of water to help them adhere. Place wonton on a lightly floured cookie sheet, repeat the process with the remaining wrappers and pork filling.
In a mixing bowl, combine chili oil, soy sauce, black vinegar, and the remaining of minced garlic. Set aside.
Bring salted water to boil in a large pot. Working in batch, boil wontons for about 5 minutes, or until the wontons are cooked through and start floating to the surface. Transfer wontons to a large strainer to drain. Add wontons to chili sauce and mix thoroughly. Sprinkle with chopped onion and serve immediately.

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from the red shallot kitchen.

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Recommended! I think they’re worth the effort – they’re so beautiful and tasty!

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sweet and sour pork

February 24, 2013

cut pork chops into little bite-sized pieces.

in a food processor, process about a half of a big onion, four cloves of raw garlic, 2T soy sauce, a half of a small can of pineapple rings, a pinch of five-spice powder, a pinch of salt, a generous amount of black pepper, a dash of rice wine vinegar, and a small amount of minced ginger. optional add-ins include part of a pear, a squeeze of citrus juice, roasted garlic, or your favorite hot sauce. (we added sriracha.)
pulse until pureed.

marinate pork in sweet and sour puree as long as you can remain patient. (about 45 mins. for us.)

meanwhile, start a pot of rice and red lentils. i flavored it with butter, salt, coriander, ginger, and sriracha.

mince an orange, red, or yellow sweet pepper. if you like it hot, you can also mince a chili pepper.

heat lard in a pan. throw in the pork and marinade. cook 5 mins, stirring regularly. add peppers. cook until pork is hot all the way through.

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cajun french onion broccoli jambalaya

February 4, 2013

this came out of a craving for broccoli cheese soup, french onion soup, and jambalaya. it’s all of them at the same time. easy to make vegetarian, too – just leave out the sausage and chicken, and replace with whatever veggies you have in the house that taste great in soup!

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fry two onions in a soup pot.

add stock, or water and bouillon.

add a head of peeled roasted garlic, two bay leaves, and a hot chili pepper or two. (i added potatoes, too, since i have a surplus.)

boil together a half-hour or so until soup base tastes wonderful.

add cajun seasoning blend (make your own with thyme, oregano, paprika, cayenne, onion and garlic, salt and pepper,) cut-up raw chicken, chunked broccoli stems, and slices of andouille sausage.

cook about another half-hour.

add broccoli florets 3 – 5 minutes before soup is done.

top with a little cheddar.

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highly recommended! hearty, rich, filling, and easy.

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gene’s beans and rice

August 4, 2012

i just made this up today.

“gene’s”?
named after my favorite sausage shop of all-time.

shrug.

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1 link smoked sausage, ~1 cup, cut into chunks and skinned (i used hungarian spicy sausage, but it’d be great with anything)
1 sweet pepper
several tomatoes from the “dollar bin” at the veg shop, with the moldy bits sliced off

a squirt of garlic-dijon mustard
a few yellow mustard seeds
a hearty scoop of horseradish
two cloves of garlic
three sundried tomatoes
a small pinch of bouillon
a dash each paprika, caraway seed, thyme, smoked salt / seasoned salt (NOT MUCH! i oversalted it, forgetting the sausage is salty), black pepper, nutmeg, Worcestershire sauce

a heavy splash of white cooking wine
a heavy splash of apple cider vinegar

three cups water
a cup and a half mixed rice and urad dal (black lentils; use any cooked bean or pea, or uncooked pulse or lentil)

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fry mustard seed and minced fresh garlic in a tiny pat of fat, then add everything else and a lid and boil.

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topped with thick yogurt and tomato sauce, and kraut if you have it

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i was going for polish, but it kind of tastes like hungarian cajun food. really. like sauerkraut-caraway-seed jambalaya.

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ribs – dry-rubbed and basted with bbq

April 15, 2012

my first ribs!

st louis style:
trim membrane and excess fat and rib tips

rub raw ribs with paprika, brown sugar, garlic, cumin, roasted coriander, ginger, salt, black pepper, cayenne, and onion powder.

let sit in fridge for a few hours.

cook at 300

they went into the oven at 6:45ish.

around 8:45ish, got turned down to 200

around 9:15, got basted with bbq sauce and broiled for a few minutes

TWO DAYS LATER:
they’re gone.
this is simply…
amazing.

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smothered pork chops

April 7, 2012

Smothered Pork Chops
barely adapted from Tyler Florence (via Food Network)

1 cup all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons onion powder
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon cayenne
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
4 pork chops, 3/4-inch thick, bone-in
1/4 cup canola oil
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
1/2 cup buttermilk
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Add the flour, onion powder, garlic powder, cayenne, salt and pepper to a wide, shallow bowl. Stir to combine. Pat both sides of the pork chops dry, then dredge them in the flour mixture.

Set a large cast iron pan or skillet over medium-high heat and add the oil. When it shimmers, shake any excess flour off the pork chops and carefully add them to the skillet. Cook for about 3 minutes on each side, or until the chops are golden brown. Transfer the pork to a plate and tent to keep warm. Sprinkle about 1 tablespoon of the seasoned flour over the pan drippings (the exact quantity of flour isn’t super important) and whisk to incorporate into the fat and cook off some of the raw flour flavor. Add the chicken broth and whisk to combine. Let the liquid cook down for about 5 minutes, or until reduced and slightly thickened. Whisk in the buttermilk then return the pork chops to the pan. Simmer for 5 minutes, or until the pork is cooked through (at least 145 F on an instant-read thermometer). Season the gravy to taste with salt and pepper and sprinkle with the parsley before serving.

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from http://traceysculinaryadventures.blogspot.com/2012/04/smothered-pork-chops.html