Posts Tagged ‘american’


vegetarian buffalo “meatballs”

February 18, 2018

1 to 2 garlic cloves
1 (15-ounce) can white beans, rinsed, drained
1 package mushrooms
1 large egg
1 cup breadcrumbs, panko, pretzel crumbs, etc.
1 celery stalk (optional)
1 teaspoon kosher salt, less if using seasoned breadcrumbs (recipe called for 1t but next time i will cut it in half)

1 tablespoon unsalted butter
a ton of vinegar-based hot pepper sauce, like buffalo sauce, tabasco, or frank’s, to taste
a dash of pure maple syrup (optional)

1/4 – 1/2 cup plain yogurt or sour cream
a splash of kefir or buttermilk, to thin
half a package crumbled blue cheese
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon chopped chives

Preheat to 400°F. Oil a baking sheet or use a silpat.
Pulse garlic in a food processor until finely chopped, or chop by hand. Add celery, beans, and mushrooms and pulse until coarsely chopped, or chop by hand and mash beans coarsely with hands in a bowl. Transfer to a large bowl. Stir in egg, panko, and 3/4 tsp. salt. Using your hands, roll tablespoonfuls of bean mixture into balls. Transfer to prepared baking sheet, packing them snugly. Roast veggie balls, turning halfway through, until firm and cooked through, 25–30 minutes.
Meanwhile, cook butter, hot sauce, and maple syrup in a small saucepan over medium heat until butter is melted. Stir until smooth; set aside.
Whisk sour cream, buttermilk, blue cheese, pepper, 1 Tbsp. plus 2 tsp. chives, and remaining 1/4 tsp. salt in a medium bowl. Top with remaining 1 tsp. chives.
Transfer veggie balls to a large bowl. Toss with hot sauce mixture and serve with blue cheese dip alongside.


adapted from epicurious


couldn’t shake a craving for buffalo wings, so i went for this. the dip is nothing new, but the veggie meatballs are a new recipe for me. i was surprised how well they stayed together – even though they did stick to the pan when i reheated them, they still stayed partially assembled. the texture is not meaty, and does suffer from a bit of the mush factor, but the mushrooms help to give it a little more bite, so it’s overall less mushy than other veggie burger recipes i have tried. there is something novel and fun about the “meatball” style, but it’s something i might try in lazy “veggie burger” form next time. i’ll make these again when i am craving restaurant-style junk food.


don’t use IPAs in your honey beer bread (and how to save your bread if you do)

March 4, 2017

a basic, six-ingredient quickbread – no breadmaking experience, no yeast, no kneading – just hot, fresh bread that anyone could make in less than an hour!

honey beer bread

3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup honey (or 2T sugar and 2T honey)
1 bottle (12 ounces) beer (not an IPA!)
4 tablespoons (half stick) butter, melted

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease a 9 x 5 x 3-inch bread pan.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt until combined. Slowly pour the beer and honey into the flour mixture, and stir until combined. (If the honey is too solid, you can put the glass jar into a small saucepan with a little water to soften the honey, or microwave it!)

Pour half of the melted butter into the bottom of the loaf pan, and tilt the pan around until a layer of butter covers the sides and bottom of the pan. Then add the batter to the pan in an even layer, and brush the rest of the butter around evenly on top of the batter.

Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, until the top of the bread is golden brown and a toothpick or knife inserted in the middle comes out clean. Serve immediately.


from gimme some oven


Don’t use a super-bitter IPA – the bread will turn out extremely bitter! If you make this mistake, though, it’s easy to fix – just eat it with a sweet spread! The sweetness cuts the bitterness. Try jam, nutella, sweetened peanut butter, or maple syrup. If you want a fancy spread to cut the bitterness, you can mix honey, maple syrup, or sugar into anything from cream cheese to mashed-up avocado. You can even mix maple syrup or honey into softened butter for some fancy “maple butter” or “honey butter” – it’s perfect on bread and you’ll find plenty of other uses for it, too. If you’re watching your sugar, make sure to use a mild beer – nothing too hoppy. A cheap beer works great for beer bread. If you used a mild beer, you can top this bread with anything from hummus to deli meats, just like any other bread. Enjoy!


oatmeal brown butter pancakes

October 29, 2016

cut in half for one or two people.

6 ounces (about 1 cup) steel cut oats
2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter
5 ounces (about 1 cup) all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 1/4 ounces (about 3 tablespoons) sugar
2 large eggs
16 ounces (about 2 cups) home-cultured kefir or buttermilk
Vegetable oil, for cooking
maple syrup to serve (optional)

brown the steel cut oats in a pan until they smell golden. shake/stir often. let cool, and blend into flour.

in still-hot pan, brown 2 T of butter.

in large bowl, combine all dry ingredients. in small bowl, beat all wet ingredients.

mix until just combined but a bit lumpy, and fry yourself up some pancakes.


recipe by seriouseats


recommended! the pancakes have a caramel flavor from the toasted oats and brown butter. great way to use some of a never-ending supply of home-cultured kefir.


honey mustard chicken salad

August 15, 2016

really fast and easy.

cooked chicken
sour cream
dried cranberries
green onions and/or onions
lemon juice
mustard (dry or prepared)
salt & pepper
optional parsley
optional celery seed


recipe by schnucks


back to basics. adding this to my chicken salad rotation for the fall, along with chicken salad with spinach, apple, and dill, and coconut lime chicken salad.


smoked oyster caesar dressing

January 14, 2016

The first tinned fish that I liked was, strangely, smoked clams. While sardines and anchovies always smelled too strong, the smoke flavor overpowered the fishiness. From there, my appreciation for tinned fish grew. I found that, when blended into sauces, I couldn’t even detect the fishiness. From there, I started adding fish sauce to my soup, stew, stir-fry, to bone broth snacks…

I am trying to work up to the point where I can snack on my mom’s herring in sour cream sauce with her. Ty and her sardine sandwiches are a great inspiration. I’m not there yet.

Until then, here’s a dressing that looks ten feet tall. Nothing subtle about this. Sounds perfect.


2 egg yolks
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1-2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1 3.7-ounce can smoked clams or oysters packed in oil & drained

In a food processor fitted with the blade attachment, or in a blender, pulse the egg yolks, lemon juice, Dijon, garlic, salt, and Worcestershire until thoroughly combined. With the machine running, add the vegetable oil very slowly to make an emulsified dressing. Then add the smoked clams or oysters.

Serve with romaine hearts, lots of black pepper, and pecorino romano cheese for a caesar salad, or pour on anything – it’ll keep for a week in the fridge.



adapted from Justin Warner’s smoked oyster caesar recipe


edit 1/2016

Well, it’s certainly powerful. It makes me want to try to make a traditional caesar with anchovy to see how it compares. This has been good on mashed rutabegas and leftover turkey. It’s not exactly bad or good. It’s just its own thing. I wouldn’t exactly recommend you serve this to picky guests. It’s… a lot. Really. Very fishy.

I cut the salt in half (to 1 tsp) when I made it, and I love salty food. 1 tsp made it plenty salty. I adjusted the recipe to reflect this. Tread with caution.


the copywriter (honey lemonade with whiskey)

October 3, 2015

looks like another winner from serious eats

honey syrup:

1/2 oz hot water
1/2 oz honey


2 oz whiskey
1/2 oz sweet vermouth
3/4 oz freshly squeezed lemon or lime juice
1/2 oz honey syrup

mix drink & top with seltzer


from serious eats


best-ever 15-minute baked beans (vegan and non-vegan versions)

May 20, 2015

really easy, fast, delicious way to switch up your bean game. you can take the finished beans and bake them in a low oven for an hour, but i think they’re just fine like this for a quick lunch. don’t let society pressure you into adding bacon and sugar. caramelized onions add plenty of sweetness.

– a long, slow cook, if you have the time. i make these for a quick 15-minute dinner and leave them simmering for an extra hour afterwards so they’ll be perfect the next day for lunch. they’re great when they have been cooking for ten minutes, but nothing can compare to how they taste a half-hour later.
– go a little heavier with the molasses than you think you should. it’s a big part of the flavor you associate with baked beans.
– don’t be scared to experiment. leftovers, like roasted bell peppers, chicken, sausages, and even bits of stale bread, can work in baked beans just like in chili.
– even if you don’t like it hot, don’t leave out the smoked paprika or cayenne – even just 2 pinches can help balance out the flavors.
– don’t forget to undersalt if you use processed meats like sausage or bacon, and oversalt if you’re leaving them out. beans like salt.

– saute onion in coconut oil (or oil of your choice)
– when caramelized, add cooked (or canned) pinto beans, tomato sauce, molasses, vegetable stock, and minced roasted garlic cloves.
– season with mustard, garlic and onion powder, clove, thyme, and smoked paprika or smoked salt if you have it. add veg worcestershire sauce if you like it.
– simmer on low for 15 minutes.
– add brown sugar, maple syrup, or hickory syrup if you like it sweet, or just serve as is.

– if you like your beans bacony, start by frying a few strips of bacon, then remove the bacon, crumble it onto a plate, and set it aside. fry onions in the bacon grease.
– otherwise (this is my favorite,) just start by sauteeing onion in chicken schmaltz (or oil of your choice)
– when caramelized, add cooked (or canned) pinto beans, tomato sauce, molasses, a little vegetable or chicken stock, and minced roasted garlic cloves.
– season with mustard, garlic and onion powder, clove, a pinch of thyme, and smoked paprika or smoked salt if you have it. add worcestershire sauce if you like it. don’t forget salt and black pepper.
– simmer on low for 15 minutes.
– add brown sugar or maple syrup if you like it sweet, or just serve as is.


edited 2016 & added to “favorites” since i make these all the time