Posts Tagged ‘american’

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smoked oyster caesar dressing

January 14, 2016

The first tinned fish that I liked was, strangely, smoked clams. While sardines and anchovies always smelled too strong, the smoke flavor overpowered the fishiness. From there, my appreciation for tinned fish grew. I found that, when blended into sauces, I couldn’t even detect the fishiness. From there, I started adding fish sauce to my soup, stew, stir-fry, to bone broth snacks…

I am trying to work up to the point where I can snack on my mom’s herring in sour cream sauce with her. Ty and her sardine sandwiches are a great inspiration. I’m not there yet.

Until then, here’s a dressing that looks ten feet tall. Nothing subtle about this. Sounds perfect.

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2 egg yolks
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1-2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1 3.7-ounce can smoked clams or oysters packed in oil & drained

In a food processor fitted with the blade attachment, or in a blender, pulse the egg yolks, lemon juice, Dijon, garlic, salt, and Worcestershire until thoroughly combined. With the machine running, add the vegetable oil very slowly to make an emulsified dressing. Then add the smoked clams or oysters.

Serve with romaine hearts, lots of black pepper, and pecorino romano cheese for a caesar salad, or pour on anything – it’ll keep for a week in the fridge.

 

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adapted from Justin Warner’s smoked oyster caesar recipe

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edit 1/2016

Well, it’s certainly powerful. It makes me want to try to make a traditional caesar with anchovy to see how it compares. This has been good on mashed rutabegas and leftover turkey. It’s not exactly bad or good. It’s just its own thing. I wouldn’t exactly recommend you serve this to picky guests. It’s… a lot. Really. Very fishy.

I cut the salt in half (to 1 tsp) when I made it, and I love salty food. 1 tsp made it plenty salty. I adjusted the recipe to reflect this. Tread with caution.

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the copywriter (honey lemonade with whiskey)

October 3, 2015

looks like another winner from serious eats

honey syrup:

1/2 oz hot water
1/2 oz honey


drink:

2 oz whiskey
1/2 oz sweet vermouth
3/4 oz freshly squeezed lemon or lime juice
1/2 oz honey syrup
(seltzer)

mix drink & top with seltzer

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from serious eats

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best-ever 15-minute baked beans (vegan and non-vegan versions)

May 20, 2015

really easy, fast, delicious way to switch up your bean game. you can take the finished beans and bake them in a low oven for an hour, but i think they’re just fine like this for a quick lunch. don’t let society pressure you into adding bacon and sugar. caramelized onions add plenty of sweetness.

VEGAN

saute onion in coconut oil (or oil of your choice)

when caramelized, add cooked (or canned) pinto beans, tomato sauce, molasses, vegetable stock, and minced roasted garlic cloves.

season with mustard, garlic and onion powder, clove, thyme, and smoked paprika or smoked salt if you have it. add veg worcestershire sauce if you like it.

simmer on low for 10 minutes.

add brown sugar or maple syrup if you like it sweet, or just serve as is.

NON-VEGAN

if you like your beans bacony, start by frying a few strips of bacon, then remove the bacon, crumble it onto a plate, and set it aside. fry onions in the bacon grease.

otherwise (this is my favorite,) just start by sauteeing onion in chicken schmaltz (or oil of your choice)

when caramelized, add cooked (or canned) pinto beans, tomato sauce, molasses, a little vegetable or chicken stock, and minced roasted garlic cloves.

season with mustard, garlic and onion powder, clove, a pinch of thyme, and smoked paprika or smoked salt if you have it. add worcestershire sauce if you like it. don’t forget salt and black pepper.

simmer on low for 10 minutes.

add brown sugar or maple syrup if you like it sweet, or just serve as is.

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oven-poached (shirred) eggs

February 9, 2015

I recommend these simple, no-fail eggs (or oefs en cocotte, the heavy cream version). The only downside is cleaning out the muffin tin.

They’re not at all greasy or chewy. This method would be great for making eggs for a large group.

If you need to surprise someone with breakfast on valentine’s day and need something you can’t possibly mess up, this is a good one. Serve with grits or toast if you like, but eggs are never limited to breakfast. They’re great on a bed of greens for lunch, or with mustard and crackers for a snack, or on top of your stir-fry or steak.

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attempt one

preheat oven to 350
pour a little grease into a muffin tin
add a bit of boiling water into each
crack an egg into indentation
sprinkle a little salt and pepper on each egg
if you like, add herbs or cheese

cook 12 minutes if you like over medium – more if you like eggs over hard; less if you like eggs over easy
(your oven may vary! watch them carefully)

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adapted from epicurious

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peachy yum-yum (easy peach cobbler)

August 6, 2014

6 peaches
2 T lemon juice
2 T corn starch
1/2 c sugar

boil 1 minute & pour into 2-qt. casserole dish

preheat oven to 400

separately, cut 3 T butter into 1 T sugar, 1 1/2 t baking powder, 1/2 t salt (opt) and 1 cup flour.
stir in 1/2 c cold milk and 1/4-1/2 t pumpkin pie spice or cinnamon.
drop by spoonfuls into peach mixture.
sprinkle brown sugar over the top and bake at 400 for 25-30 min.

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i forgot to write down the name of this (“peach cobbler”). i rushed over to a friend’s with it. when they asked me what it was called, i said “peachy yum-yum” without thinking about it.

the cobbler is like biscuit dough. the peach syrup that forms from cooking the peaches for just one minute is thick, red, rich, and habit-forming.

this is a great and easy method for softening underripe peaches. highly recommended, even if you skip the biscuit dough on top and just snack on some peaches and sugar.

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from pick your own: peach recipes

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compromise cornbread

June 12, 2014

it is not easy to find a cornbread everyone can agree on.

should it be sweet or savory? dense or light? mostly cornmeal or mostly white flour?

i finally found a cornbread recipe that can please those who like northern cornbread (sweet and light) and those who like it southern-style (savory and dense).

1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour (i used about 1 1/4 c apf, a quarter-cup combined coconut and oat flours, and a quarter-cup combined sorghum and rice flours. you can also use your favorite gf flour mixture.)
1 cup cornmeal
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 teaspoon salt or seasoned salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted and cooled, or for a moister but less healthy cornbread, 1/4c veg oil and 1/4c cooled and melted butter
1 large egg
3/4 can of corn kernels (opt) [i used a whole can and it was just a tiny bit too much]
1/2 serrano or jalapeno, minced (opt)
huge pinch cheese (opt)
huge pinch of smoked paprika (opt)
huge pinch roasted garlic powder (opt)
huge pinch fresh cilantro (opt)
small pinch dried oregano (opt)

grease your pan or muffin tin

preheat to 375

whisk together dry ingredients.

separately (i used a large mason jar and shook it up together) combine the wet ingredients

mix together until just combined

bake 25+ mins or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean
(muffins took about 35 minutes and bread in large casserole dish took over 45 minutes)

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modified from the king arthur flour recipe

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vegan cajun “blackened andouille sausage”

May 4, 2014

another happy accident from my kitchen to yours.

cut extra firm tofu into “steaks” and marinate in your favorite dressing or marinade as long as you can stand. (i did oil, lemon juice, soy sauce, garlic, tahini, and some other stuff. you can use salad dressing if you’re lazy.) sprinkle with a lot of cajun seasonings. if you don’t have it, throw together lots of paprika with a little salt, thyme, red pepper, black pepper, and lots of garlic powder. make it as spicy as you can stand with red pepper or cayenne.

marinate a few hours, or as long as you can stand to wait.

start hot chili oil (or any high heat oil like canola) on medium-high, like for flash-frying.

fry on one side until dark brown.

start to break it up with your spatula. get rough with it, until it crumbles into ground sausage sized pieces.

continue stir-frying until crumbles firm up and get meaty.

serve on top of a salad – i can attest that this is terrific for dinner!
you can also serve it anywhere you need a little spice! How about on a vegan po’ boy sandwich, in a stir-fry, mixed into a bean salad, tucked into a lasagna, or – of course – jambalaya, gumbo, or any of their infinite variations? the possibilities are endless!

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