Posts Tagged ‘waste not’

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springtime niçoise style salad

April 14, 2018

niçoise salad is amazing and versatile. ever tried it with asparagus? i can’t get fresh green beans in april, so i made an asparagus niçoise style salad for the spring.

the best part is, none of these ingredients are necessary. any leftover vegetables would be great in here. swap out whatever you have or don’t have, and build your dream salad. it’s a great way to use leftover boiled potatoes.

– 1 bunch asparagus
– medium-boiled eggs (the internet said 7 minutes for medium-boiled eggs. but they came out soft-boiled. delicious but not the same.)
– diced artichoke hearts
– chopped olives (use what you have in the house; they don’t have to be nicoise olives)
– leftover boiled potatoes (i used purple fleshed potatoes that were on sale at the co-op and they were beautiful contrasted with the bright green asparagus and bright yellow yolks)
– (optional: tuna or anchovies, if you eat fish)

dressing:
dijon mustard
apple cider vinegar
a few pinches of minced onions or garlic
any fresh herb you have in the house
pinch of salt and pepper

roast asparagus in olive oil on 425 until it cooked but still crunchy, just eight minutes or so

cut everything into bite-sized chunks, like for potato salad or egg salad, top with vinaigrette, and serve.

don’t be constrained by this recipe. get creative! next time, i’d love to add some radishes for crunch. epicurious says to add raw red and yellow bell peppers, fresh tomatoes, and tons of parsley. david lebovitz uses fresh cucumbers, fresh fava beans, fresh basil, and a half a head of lettuce. others call for capers, celery, salmon and sugar, baby beets….

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recipe modified from all the recipes cited above, created by friedsig, and, mostly inspired by this bon apetit recipe that planted itself into my subconscious

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artichokes and asparagus are two of my favorite foods. here you can eat them at the same time!

it’s nice to have a new quick lunch for the week with just a little weekend meal prep. if you make the vinaigrette and roast the asparagus and boil the potatoes and eggs on a weekend, you can construct this salad in five minutes. also, a great seasonal salad: use tomatoes and cucumbers in an august salad, and asparagus and radishes in an april salad. it’s also nice to have a unifying theme, and feel like, “i am eating nicoise salad,” and not, “i am eating this hastily assembled pile of leftovers”

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bourbon chicken liver pâté

August 17, 2016

“Pâté” feels pretentious, but chicken liver is less than half the price of hamburger meat.

I eat organ meats because:
they’re cheap
they’re delicious
it reduces waste
they’re nutritious (one serving is 280% of your daily need for vitamins A and B12)
did I mention they are cheap?

If you do eat meat, I highly recommend you give chicken liver a try. It’s so quick to cook, and very easy.

One of my favorite preparations has never made it onto friedsig, so here we go: a modification of the classic bourbon chicken liver pâté. This one is modified from epicurious.

– Heat a cast iron pan with about 1.5 T butter, or however much you like. (They say half a stick.)
– Saute a medium onion over medium-low til it caramelizes.
– Add a minced clove of garlic.
– Add one container (~1 lb) of rinsed chicken livers. (Pick off the little globs of fat if you want, but leave some on if you went light on the butter.)
– Saute about 4 minutes on one side, then flip.
– Add lots of fresh or a little dried sage and thyme. Add salt, pepper, and a pinch of nutmeg. Stir and add 2 T bourbon.
– Make sure each piece has been cooked on both sides when stirring.
– Cut one of the biggest livers in half. If it’s no longer bloody, mostly cooked, but still pink in the middle, it’s perfect. Don’t overcook – 8 minutes should be plenty.
– Blend in a blender or food processor. Do NOT add the liquid unless you want a drinkable pate – just the liver and onions. You can add the liquid as needed to blend into a thick consistency. I like to add a dash of heavy cream, but that is optional. Or, like epicurious suggests, scoop it into tiny bowls and add a little melted butter over the top.

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modified from epicurious

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You can serve this as a dip with cut up veggies, crackers, or toasts. You can use this as a sandwich spread – great with lots of fresh greens and herbs. You can roll this up in greens and make it into finger food. You can add a little to make a sauce richer, or to sneak it in if you don’t like the taste. You can eat it with pasta. You can layer it in casseroles like any other meat. Just try a little spread on a cracker!

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strawberry dressing

January 10, 2016

maybe you are in a part of the world that isn’t frozen – or maybe you’re reading this in the heat of the summer.

this will be an attempt to:
1. break the monotony of my favorite dressings that i can’t stop making
2. bring a little summer to this wildly cold day

also a great way to use up the strawberries in your garden or fridge that are right on the edge of too soft to eat.

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a cup of strawberries, or however many you have
1/3 c olive oil, or other nice dressing oil, like walnut
1 tsp balsamic, or to taste
a squeeze of fresh lemon juice
a pinch of salt

blend til smooth

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from just one cookbook

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perfect poached eggs

April 21, 2013

really into poached eggs lately. looked up how to get the whites to stay together. seems easy enough, and i hate wasting all those bits of egg white!

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Heat the water: Add enough water to come 1 inch up the side of a narrow, deep 2-quart saucier. Add 1 teaspoon kosher salt and 2 teaspoons white vinegar and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Meanwhile, crack 1 very fresh cold large egg into a cup. Use the handle of a spatula or spoon to quickly stir the water in one direction until it’s all smoothly spinning around.

TIP: Use this whirlpool method when poaching a single serving (one or two eggs). For bigger batches, heat the water, salt and vinegar in a 12-inch nonstick skillet and do not stir.

Add the egg: Carefully drop the egg into the center of the whirlpool. The swirling water will help prevent the white from “feathering,” or spreading out in the pan.

Let it poach: Turn off the heat, cover the pan and set your timer for 5 minutes. Don’t peek, poke, stir or accost the egg in any way.

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from tv

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kimchi bibimbap

January 18, 2013

“stirred rice” – rice stirred up with leftovers!

+ last night’s rice
+ any leftovers you have in your fridge – meat, veggies, whatever
+ bolgogi (sweet korean rib-eye cooked with pear,) if you have it lying around. (you can leave it out.)
+ cut-up pieces of raw fresh veggies, like cucumbers, bean sprouts, carrots, or spinach
+ a handful of kim-chi, cut up
+ a fried egg
+ a gojuchang sauce made of 3 tablespoons Gochujang paste, 1/2 tablespoon apple cider vinegar, 3ish minced cloves of garlic, 3 teaspoons soy sauce, 1/2 tablespoon Korean fine red pepper flakes, 1 tablespoon dark sesame oil, and 1/2 tablespoon sesame seeds
+ a topping of dried and salted seaweed

mix together and eat

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based on a recipe from heart mind and seoul

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crunchy-top spicy quinoa bites

December 22, 2012

2 cups cooked quinoa
3/4 cup grated cheese (they recommend gruyere)
2 eggs, beaten
2 green onions, thinly sliced
1 clove minced garlic
1 tablespoon chopped cilantro
1 tablespoon honey
1 1/2 tablespoons sriracha or chili-garlic sauce
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup breadcrumbs (whole wheat or white)

Preheat oven to 350°F
Oil the cups of two mini 12 count muffin pans. Set aside.
Stir all of the ingredients together in a large bowl. The mixture should be sticky and cling to a spoon. (Add more breadcrumbs if it’s too loose.)
Spoon the mixture into one cup. Press down firmly with your fingers. Add more, if necessary, to fill even with the top. Press firmly again. Continue filling the cups in this manner. You should be able to fill 18 to 20 of the cups.
Bake for 15-20 minutes, rotating the pans halfway through. Keep an eye on the edges – if they brown, go ahead and remove the pans from the oven.
Allow to cool for 5 minutes, then turn out on a cooling rack. Serve immediately.

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from leaf and grain

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pumpkin bread pudding with raisins

September 30, 2012

1 cup golden raisins
1/3 cup spiced rum or spiced liqueur, orange or lemon liqueurs like cointreau, or similar
1/3 cup hot water

1 12 ounce day old baguette, cut into 3/4 inch cubes
1 15 ounce can pure pumpkin
4 large eggs
1 1/2 cup blend of milk, half-n-half, cream, coconut milk, kefir, yogurt, almond milk, or whatever you like in whatever proportions you like
1 cup sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ginger
1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice (or mixed allspice and cinnamon with a pinch of clove and nutmeg and mace if you’ve got it)
pinch nutmeg
pinch salt
butter to grease
brown sugar to sprinkle

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Preheat oven to 350 degrees
Place raisins in a bowl and cover with rum and hot water; set aside to soak for 20 minutes.
Grease 6 – 10 ounce ramekins (or bread pan)
Sprinkle brown sugar in the bottom of each buttered ramekin; set aside
In a large bowl combine pumpkin, milky stuff, eggs, sugar, vanilla, spices and salt; whisk together
Toss in bread cubes
Fold in soaked raisins
Divide among the ramekins and press down to level
Bake until custard is set in the center and top is golden, about 40 minutes.
Remove from oven and allow to cool slightly

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adapted from my sous chef is a dog

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not bad hot with ice cream on top, but not my favorite. i prefer my bread pudding a little puddingy, and this was a bit too dry for my tastes. next time maybe i’ll use coconut milk instead of milk for a creamier texture.