Archive for the ‘bread’ Category

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oatmeal brown butter pancakes

October 29, 2016

cut in half for one or two people.

6 ounces (about 1 cup) steel cut oats
2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter
5 ounces (about 1 cup) all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 1/4 ounces (about 3 tablespoons) sugar
2 large eggs
16 ounces (about 2 cups) home-cultured kefir or buttermilk
Vegetable oil, for cooking
maple syrup to serve (optional)

brown the steel cut oats in a pan until they smell golden. shake/stir often. let cool, and blend into flour.

in still-hot pan, brown 2 T of butter.

in large bowl, combine all dry ingredients. in small bowl, beat all wet ingredients.

mix until just combined but a bit lumpy, and fry yourself up some pancakes.

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recipe by seriouseats

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recommended! the pancakes have a caramel flavor from the toasted oats and brown butter. great way to use some of a never-ending supply of home-cultured kefir.

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irish oatmeal soda bread

January 27, 2016

this completes a trinity of irish soda breads.

between this irish oatmeal soda bread, this savory rosemary soda bread, and this sweet soda bread with raisins, you can please anyone.

this one’s right in the middle. it’s by far the most neutral of the three. it doesn’t have as much of the characteristic “irish soda bread” flavor as the other two. it’s just a good quick bread to whip up and occupy the second rack when you’re roasting vegetables or meat.

& since it’s a soda bread, you don’t need yeast, and you don’t have to wait for anything to rise. just mix the ingredients with your hands, and plop it on a cookie sheet. super easy. my housemate really liked this one, but i thought it was too dense. i just wonder if 375 is the right temp for my oven – the crumb came out doughy and glutinous. or did i overmix it? or does it need more baking soda? it calls for a third of the baking soda of the rosemary brown butter bread. any suggestions?

 

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4 cups all purpose flour
1/3 cup old fashioned oats {plus more for sprinkling}
2 tbsp sugar
1 tsp baking soda
4 tbsp cold butter, cut into small chunks
1 ½ tsp salt
1 ¾ cups well-shaken buttermilk or homemade kefir
1 egg, lightly beaten

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, oats, baking soda, sugar and salt. Cut the butter into the dry ingredients with your fingers until no more large clumps exist.
Combine the lightly beaten egg with the buttermilk. Pour into dry ingredients and mix. Dough will be wet!
Using wet hands, form a large shaggy ball of dough and place on a parchment paper lined sheet tray. Cut an “x” in the center of the loaf with a knife and sprinkle oats on top.
Bake for 50 minutes, until golden brown. Let cool for 10 minutes before slicing.

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from pbs

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irish soda bread

February 17, 2015

This adaptation of Rosie’s Irish soda bread is perfect for a snow day. Much faster than a yeast bread – no waiting for it to rise!

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3 1⁄2 cups flour
1/4 – 1⁄2 cup sugar (optional; only use if you want this to be a dessert)
1⁄2 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups of sour cream, plain kefir or yogurt, buttermilk, or anything that’s creamy and tangy
2 eggs
1 tablespoon caraway seeds (optional)
3⁄4 cup raisins

preheat oven to 350.

mix flour, sugar, baking soda and powder, and salt in a large mixing bowl.

separately, in another bowl, mix eggs and sour cream/kefir/etc.

combine both, and knead with caraway seeds and raisins.

dough will be so sticky you’ll think you did something wrong.

transfer dough into a dutch oven, a springform pan, a 9″ round casserole dish, or if all else fails, a cookie sheet. (i did, and it flattened out a bit in the oven but was still delicious!)

flour your hands and pat top (and sides, if on a cookie sheet) of loaf until it is no longer sticky.

bake for ~55 minutes

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adapted from rosie’s irish soda bread

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The combination of caraway seeds and raisins is surprisingly amazing. This is so fast and painless for bread, and a great way to use the endless sour kefir that is always in my fridge! The recipe called for 1/2 c sugar, but I wouldn’t use that much again. It was way too sweet for me. Wonderful recipe otherwise! It’s dense and satisfying.

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doubles

July 22, 2014

this is the quintessential trinidadian street food.

savory, sweet, hot, filling, and wonderful.

doubles consist of two (hence the name) flat pieces of fry-bread called BARA filled with a chickpea mixture.

it is also agreed throughout the recipes i checked out that the chickpeas and bara themselves are not the sweet, spicy, and sour flavor doubles are known for. this flavor comes from the condiments. see below for toppings!

it is the kind of street food that people in trinidad don’t really cook at home (source) but if you have a craving like i do, you can try to make it at home.
the doubles i got at trini-gul in a west indian neighborhood in brooklyn were one of the best foods i’ve ever had in my entire life.

i hope to make them at home and have them taste even half as good.

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bara

2 cups flour
1/2 tsp salt
1 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp ground pepper
1 T baking powder
1 teaspoon yeast
1/3 cup warm water
1/4 tsp sugar
Oil for frying

place warm water, sugar, and yeast in a bowl until foamy.

knead ingredients together until dough is smooth.

pour a bit of oil over the top, cover the bowl with a kitchen towel, and rest until dough doubles.

oil or wet your hands – dough is sticky. make two-inch balls. flatten to the size of your hand.

fry, at about forty seconds per side or until puffy and done.

adapted from trini gourmet, simply trini cooking, and chennette

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chickpeas

heat 1 T oil in a heavy bottomed pot or pan. add a chopped onion. when soft, add 1 t curry powder, 1 t turmeric, three cloves of garlic minced, 2 t ground cumin, 2 t salt, 1 t pepper, 5 leaves chadon beni (bandhania/culantro/long cilantro, or substitute cilantro,) and 1 t trinidadian pepper sauce. stir-fry until fragrant. add 2 c chickpeas and a cup of water. simmer until chickpeas are soft.

adapted from trini gourmet, simply trini cooking, amazing trinidad, and chennette.

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you MUST top with grated or preserved cucumbers or cucumber chutney, mango kuchela (trinidadian sweet&sour chutney,) and tamarind sauce to get that flavor!

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compromise cornbread

June 12, 2014

it is not easy to find a cornbread everyone can agree on.

should it be sweet or savory? dense or light? mostly cornmeal or mostly white flour?

i finally found a cornbread recipe that can please those who like northern cornbread (sweet and light) and those who like it southern-style (savory and dense).

1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour (i used about 1 1/4 c apf, a quarter-cup combined coconut and oat flours, and a quarter-cup combined sorghum and rice flours. you can also use your favorite gf flour mixture.)
1 cup cornmeal
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 teaspoon salt or seasoned salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted and cooled, or for a moister but less healthy cornbread, 1/4c veg oil and 1/4c cooled and melted butter
1 large egg
3/4 can of corn kernels (opt) [i used a whole can and it was just a tiny bit too much]
1/2 serrano or jalapeno, minced (opt)
huge pinch cheese (opt)
huge pinch of smoked paprika (opt)
huge pinch roasted garlic powder (opt)
huge pinch fresh cilantro (opt)
small pinch dried oregano (opt)

grease your pan or muffin tin

preheat to 375

whisk together dry ingredients.

separately (i used a large mason jar and shook it up together) combine the wet ingredients

mix together until just combined

bake 25+ mins or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean
(muffins took about 35 minutes and bread in large casserole dish took over 45 minutes)

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modified from the king arthur flour recipe

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jalapeno-cheddar beer bread

October 6, 2013

BEER-BATTER CHEESE BREAD
MAKES ONE 9-INCH LOAF

Insert the toothpick in a few spots when testing for doneness; it may hit a pocket of cheese, which resembles uncooked batter on the toothpick. Strongly flavored beers make the bread bitter, so mild beers work best here.

8 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, 4 ounces shredded and 4 ounces cut into ¼ -inch cubes
one or two minced fresh jalapenos, seeded
3 cups (15 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons sugar
4 teaspoons baking powder
1½ teaspoons salt
½ teaspoon pepper
1 (12-ounce) bottle light-bodied beer (see note)
4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter, melted

1. Adjust an oven rack to the middle position and heat the oven to 375 degrees. Grease a 9 by 5 inch loaf pan.
2. Combine the shredded and cubed cheese, flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and pepper in a large bowl. Stir in the beer and mix until well combined. Pour the batter into the prepared loaf pan, spreading it to the corners. Drizzle the melted butter evenly over the top of the batter.
3. Bake until the loaf is deep golden brown and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, 45 to 50 minutes. Cool the bread in the pan for 5 minutes, then turn it out onto a rack. Cool completely and slice as desired. (Although this bread can be kept in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days, after the second day the bread is best toasted.)

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from chris and libbie, who in turn got it from cooks illustrated, who i refuse to link now that they are charging for their recipes. food is a right and recipes should be free!

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thin crust spinach and feta pizza

August 31, 2013

Dough

1 1/2 to 2 teaspoons instant yeast*
2 teaspoons sugar
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon Baker’s Special Dry Milk or nonfat dry milk
3 1/2 cups King Arthur Italian-Style Flour
3/4 cup to 3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons lukewarm water*
2 tablespoons olive oil
*Use the greater amount of yeast if you plan on baking the pizza right away; the lesser amount if you’ll refrigerate the dough first.
**Use the lesser amount of water in summer or humid conditions; the greater amount in winter or under drier conditions.

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1) In a medium-sized mixing bowl (or in a bread machine set on the dough/manual cycle), combine all of the ingredients to make a very soft dough. Knead for 5 to 7 minutes (or allow the dough to go through the bread machine’s dough cycle); the dough will gradually become smooth and cohesive, though it’ll remain quite sticky.

2) To bake pizza immediately, divide the dough in half, and let each half rest, covered, for about 15 minutes, while you preheat your oven to 450°F. To bake pizza later, transfer the dough to a lightly greased bowl. Cover the bowl, and let the dough rise for 1 hour, then refrigerate it for up to 3 days.

3) While the dough is resting or rising (or just before you’re ready to bake pizza), start preheating the oven to 450°F, and prepare your toppings.

4) For spinach and feta pizza, thaw the frozen spinach, and squeeze it in your hands (or a paper towel, or a dish towel) until it’s very dry.

5) Heat the olive oil, and sauté the spinach, salt, and garlic for a couple of minutes, just until hot and well combined.

6) Divide the dough in half. You’ll be working with one piece of dough at a time. To make two pizzas now, set one half aside, lightly covered, while you work with the first piece. To make one pizza now, one later, return half the dough to the refrigerator, covered; use it within a day or two.

7) Lightly grease two sheets of parchment paper, waxed paper, or (last choice) plastic wrap. Lightly grease one or two large rectangular pans (half sheet pans work well), and drizzle with olive oil.

8) Sandwich the dough between the two pieces of paper, greased sides touching the dough. Roll the dough super-thin; the low protein in Italian-style flour will allow you to do this pretty easily. If the dough fights back, walk away for 10 minutes, then return and roll some more.

9) Peel the paper off one side of the crust. Place the crust, paper side up, on the prepared pan. Peel off the remaining paper.

10) Top the crust with half the spinach and half the feta. Spray lightly with olive oil spray, if you have it; this will help the feta brown a bit.

11) Bake the pizza on a lower rack of the oven for 5 minutes, to brown the bottom crust. Then move it to a middle or upper-middle rack, and continue to bake for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the top of the crust is golden and the feta is beginning to brown.

12) Remove the pizza from the oven, and transfer it to a rack immediately, so the crust stays crisp. Serve hot.

13) Repeat with the remaining half of the dough. Or return to the refrigerator, along with the remaining topping ingredients, and bake later.

Yield: 2 large thin-crust pizzas, about 8 to 10 servings total.

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adapted from here

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This old-school recipe turned out great. I topped the dough with just a little melty cheese (mozarella or monterey jack would be great, but all I had was cheddar and that was fine) and a lot of crumbled feta. I sauteed fresh greens (not just spinach, but a blend with arugala – use whatever you have) with olive oil and a pinch of nutmeg and salt, and squeezed it before putting it on the pizza so it wouldn’t make the crust soggy. Then I added bits of kalamata olives and pickled Greek peppers, and a little oregano from the garden.

The crust came out perfectly crispy. Remember to roll it thin! It’s a great looking pizza. The recipe is really specific, but it works. I recommend this highly if you have dry powdered milk in your pantry!