Archive for the ‘bread’ Category

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sourdough quickbread

May 23, 2018

How do you use the extra starter from rye bread? For dessert?

Strangely, this comes from r/Sourdough, but I read the recipe on Bakers and Best.

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⅓ C butter, room temperature
½ C sugar
1 egg
1 C unfed sourdough starter
1 tsp vanilla
2 C AP flour
1 tsp baking powder
½ tsp baking soda
¾ tsp salt

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350 F.
In a small bowl use a fork to cream together the butter and sugar. Once combined add in the egg, starter, and vanilla. Mix until combined.
In a separate bowl mix together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt.
Add the flour mixture to the starter mixture, stirring just until blended. If the batter is too thick add water 1 tsp at a time until it can be easily stirred.
Pour batter into greased loaf pan; let rest for 15 to 20 minutes.
Bake at 350F until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, about 40 minutes.

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Like most quickbreads from zucchini bread to Irish soda bread, the texture is a bit crumbly and dense. It looks just like a beer bread made with a light beer (which I’d recommend). Unlike beer bread, though it has enough sugar in it that it tasted weird with artichoke hearts and poached eggs. So this is a good dessert, but not a dinner bread.

Using a non-onion sourdough might make this a really interesting sweet and sour dessert. I really would not recommend using onion caraway rye starter for this recipe. It’s not as terrible as I feared it could be – the rye actually gives a really interesting flavor to the quickbread, enough that I’d consider using a rye and apf blend for dessert again. But not ideal with raw onions.

If you like a dessert, give this a try! If you want a quickbread with a savory taste, this rosemary and brown butter soda bread has been my go-to recipe this year. If you want something a little more neutral, this Irish oatmeal soda bread recipe is a great not-quite sweet-or-savory oatmeal bread. And if you love dessert-y quickbreads, this molasses brown bread I just discovered is pretty awesome, and this sweet mini lemon bread was a huge hit with my poetry class!

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bauernbrot (healthy buckwheat rye bread)

May 20, 2018

It’s…. healthy. Really interesting recipe:

bauernbrot

bauernbrot – Austrian buckwheat and rye loaf – @ friedsig

RYE STARTER (sauerteig):

2 medium onions, coarsely chopped
4 cups rye flour
3.5 c warm water
2 packages dry yeast
1 T caraway

wrap onion pieces in cheesecloth. combine other ingredients and push the onion-bag into the goo like some kind of weird onion tea.

leave overnight at room temperature, no more than 24 hours. scrape the sour off the cheesecloth. discard onions. good luck getting the onion smell out of your cheesecloth. refrigerate the rest and use for future breads. make sure to feed it like any starter, by removing some, and replacing it with flour and water.

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BAUERNBROT RECIPE:

1 cup rye sour starter (recipe above)
4 cups buckwheat flour
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 package dry yeast
1.5 c warm water
2 t salt
1 T caraway seed (or less, to taste)
1/4 molasses, dark preferred

1 T salt mixed with 1/4 c water (to brush)

in a large bowl, blend buckwheat and all-purpose flours and set aside.

in another large bowl, dissolve yeast in 1.5 c warm water and add 2 cups of the buckwheat-apf mix. beat with a wooden spoon or mixer until smooth and porridge-like.

cover bowl and let stand 1.5 hours at room temperature.

stir down dough and add starter, 2 t salt, caraway, and molasses. add remaining flour til dough pulls away from the bowl. don’t add too much flour. this bread is dense enough!

knead 8 mins.

divide into two loaves. set them on a cookie sheet. brush tops with water and let sit 40 mins.

preheat oven to 350.

brush loaves with saltwater, put in oven. brush loaves every 10 mins with saltwater.

bake about 40 mins or until a toothpick inserted into the loaves comes out clean.

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from Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads by Bernard Clayton

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wow! what a healthy tasting bread! dense and dark! the salt crust is like a pretzel party on the outside! this is not a loaf for the faint of heart. give this a shot if you like hearty, healthy, winter-y, peasant-loaf-type breads. it reminds me a bit of those wildly dense “fitness breads” in the german and polish markets. it’s a little much for me. if you love sweet, soft white breads, you might find yourself trying to give away the second loaf. but if you love heavy, hearty breads, trying to get more whole grains into your diet, wanting to stay fuller longer (seriously! one slice and i’m full,) or looking for something really different, this is the bread for you!

best of all, buckwheat is gluten-free (although the bread calls for all-purpose flour too and therefore the bread itself contains gluten). buckwheat is high in fiber and low to medium on the glycemic index, which makes it suitable for some people who cannot eat white bread. it’s also high in magnesium, manganese, thiamin, B6, and many other vitamins and minerals.

good with a strong sandwich spread, like a creamy balsamic, with tomatoes.
good with strong cheese.
good for teatime sandwiches with butter and radish, or ham and cheese.
and strangely good for dessert with a simple homemade compound butter of sweetened sorghum molasses and a pinch of cinnamon mixed into unsalted butter.

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baked brown bread

April 26, 2018

another gem from the Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads! he says this is just the same as boston brown bread, but baked instead of steamed in a coffee can.

1/2 cup yellow or white cornmeal
1.5 c all purpose flour
1 cup each rye and whole wheat flour
1 cup packed brown sugar (note: do not use this much if using a sweetened molasses)
1 cup molasses
2 t each baking soda and salt
2 c buttermilk, or homemade kefir, or milk thickened with lemon juice
1 c broken walnuts

9″ or larger dutch oven or equivalent covered casserole, greased

to a large bowl, add the cornmeal, rye, whole wheat, and all purpose flours. add brown sugar, molasses, baking soda, and salt. pour in buttermilk and mix well. stir in walnuts.

pour mixture into dutch oven. cover. DO NOT PREHEAT THE OVEN. when dutch oven is inside your cold oven, turn it on to 350 and bake for about an hour. test for doneness like brownies: stick a toothpick or wood skewer into the middle and if crumbs cling to the toothpick, cook the bread longer.

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from Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads

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wow! not sure how this would taste without the weird local sorghum molasses i used, which is heavily sweetened (but was the only choice of molasses under $8 at the co-op, haha). if you are using some molasses like this, cut down on the sugar by quite a bit. this came out as sweet as banana bread. the rye flour and whole wheat flour are almost undetectable – at least, when masked by that much sugar. this recipe makes one giant loaf of beautiful brown bread. i’ll cut this loaf in half next time because it was enough to eat every day for a week and still give half away. everyone who tried it loved it. if you don’t feel like steaming your bread in a coffee can, and you have a big dutch oven, and you want something almost like banana bread but not quite, give this a try!

next time, i will
– add the whole cup of walnuts
– cut the recipe in half
– cut down the brown sugar or use unsweetened molasses

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english oatmeal bread

April 23, 2018

thanks so much to Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads – my new favorite bread book! if you have a favorite bread book, leave it in the comments!

2 cups rolled oats / oatmeal
2 cups milk
1 package yeast
2 T butter, room temperature
2 t salt
1 c whole wheat flour
2 c bread flour or unbleached flour
1 egg, beaten, mixed with 1 T water

(this makes 2 loaves; cut in half for one loaf)

soak oatmeal in milk for 2 hours

stir yeast into oatmeal mixture, add butter, salt, and whole wheat flour. beat by hand 100 strokes or in an electric mixer at medium speed. add 1/2 c white flour and continue beating for two minutes.

stir in balance of flour, 1/2 c at a time. the dough will be a rough, shaggy mass that cleans the sides of the bowl. if it is slack and moist, and sticks to the fingers, sprinkle with a little extra flour. (NOT TOO MUCH – I ADDED TOO MUCH!)

knead 8 mins. “occasionally change the kneading rhythm by raising the dough above the table and crashing it down hard against the surface. wham!

place dough in mixing bowl and pat with buttered fingers to keep the surface from crusting. cover the bowl and rise to twice its original size, about 1.5 hours. or poke – dent remains when dough is risen.

punch down, shape into two loaves. second rise: til doubled, about 45 minutes.

brush tops with egg wash and/or sprinkle with oats on top.

preheat oven to 400 20 mins before baking

bake in the hot oven 30 mins, reduce heat to 350, and continue baking another 20 to 30 minutes

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thanks again to Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads for this great recipe – i really recommend this book for anyone who wants three hundred new recipes to try!

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i made every possible user error with this bread. my yeast was dead, so it didn’t rise, and i added way too much flour to the dough. it was still edible despite its outerworldly denseness, so i’m definitely going to give this another shot with some living yeast soon.

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don’t use IPAs in your honey beer bread (and how to save your bread if you do)

March 4, 2017

a basic, six-ingredient quickbread – no breadmaking experience, no yeast, no kneading – just hot, fresh bread that anyone could make in less than an hour!

honey beer bread

3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup honey (or 2T sugar and 2T honey)
1 bottle (12 ounces) beer (not an IPA!)
4 tablespoons (half stick) butter, melted

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease a 9 x 5 x 3-inch bread pan.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt until combined. Slowly pour the beer and honey into the flour mixture, and stir until combined. (If the honey is too solid, you can put the glass jar into a small saucepan with a little water to soften the honey, or microwave it!)

Pour half of the melted butter into the bottom of the loaf pan, and tilt the pan around until a layer of butter covers the sides and bottom of the pan. Then add the batter to the pan in an even layer, and brush the rest of the butter around evenly on top of the batter.

Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, until the top of the bread is golden brown and a toothpick or knife inserted in the middle comes out clean. Serve immediately.

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from gimme some oven

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Don’t use a super-bitter IPA – the bread will turn out extremely bitter! If you make this mistake, though, it’s easy to fix – just eat it with a sweet spread! The sweetness cuts the bitterness. Try jam, nutella, sweetened peanut butter, or maple syrup. If you want a fancy spread to cut the bitterness, you can mix honey, maple syrup, or sugar into anything from cream cheese to mashed-up avocado. You can even mix maple syrup or honey into softened butter for some fancy “maple butter” or “honey butter” – it’s perfect on bread and you’ll find plenty of other uses for it, too. If you’re watching your sugar, make sure to use a mild beer – nothing too hoppy. A cheap beer works great for beer bread. If you used a mild beer, you can top this bread with anything from hummus to deli meats, just like any other bread. Enjoy!

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oatmeal brown butter pancakes

October 29, 2016

cut in half for one or two people.

6 ounces (about 1 cup) steel cut oats
2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter
5 ounces (about 1 cup) all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 1/4 ounces (about 3 tablespoons) sugar
2 large eggs
16 ounces (about 2 cups) home-cultured kefir or buttermilk
Vegetable oil, for cooking
maple syrup to serve (optional)

brown the steel cut oats in a pan until they smell golden. shake/stir often. let cool, and blend into flour.

in still-hot pan, brown 2 T of butter.

in large bowl, combine all dry ingredients. in small bowl, beat all wet ingredients.

mix until just combined but a bit lumpy, and fry yourself up some pancakes.

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recipe by seriouseats

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recommended! the pancakes have a caramel flavor from the toasted oats and brown butter. great way to use some of a never-ending supply of home-cultured kefir.

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irish oatmeal soda bread

January 27, 2016

this completes a trinity of irish soda breads.

between this irish oatmeal soda bread, this savory rosemary soda bread, and this sweet soda bread with raisins, you can please anyone.

this one’s right in the middle. it’s by far the most neutral of the three. it doesn’t have as much of the characteristic “irish soda bread” flavor as the other two. it’s just a good quick bread to whip up and occupy the second rack when you’re roasting vegetables or meat.

& since it’s a soda bread, you don’t need yeast, and you don’t have to wait for anything to rise. just mix the ingredients with your hands, and plop it on a cookie sheet. super easy. my housemate really liked this one, but i thought it was too dense. i just wonder if 375 is the right temp for my oven – the crumb came out doughy and glutinous. or did i overmix it? or does it need more baking soda? it calls for a third of the baking soda of the rosemary brown butter bread. any suggestions?

 

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4 cups all purpose flour
1/3 cup old fashioned oats {plus more for sprinkling}
2 tbsp sugar
1 tsp baking soda
4 tbsp cold butter, cut into small chunks
1 ½ tsp salt
1 ¾ cups well-shaken buttermilk or homemade kefir
1 egg, lightly beaten

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, oats, baking soda, sugar and salt. Cut the butter into the dry ingredients with your fingers until no more large clumps exist.
Combine the lightly beaten egg with the buttermilk. Pour into dry ingredients and mix. Dough will be wet!
Using wet hands, form a large shaggy ball of dough and place on a parchment paper lined sheet tray. Cut an “x” in the center of the loaf with a knife and sprinkle oats on top.
Bake for 50 minutes, until golden brown. Let cool for 10 minutes before slicing.

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from pbs