Archive for the ‘bread’ Category

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kefir / buttermilk biscuits

May 7, 2020

If you culture kefir, you know the struggle: mountains of extra kefir. It takes up valuable refrigerator real estate! This recipe is a great way to use that extra kefir.

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2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tbsp sugar
3/4 tsp salt
9 tbsp chilled butter, divided (see notes below)
1 cup unflavored kefir (or buttermilk, or sour milk)
(optional: spices or herbs or citrus zest)

Preheat the oven to 450°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. (note: I did not use parchment.)
Sift together the dry ingredients in a mixing bowl.
Cube the butter, mix it into the dry ingredients using the pulse mode in a food processor or slowly mix with mixer. Mix until it becomes crumbly. (note: I did this by hand.)
Mix in 1 cup cold kefir, just until the mixture is moistened. The dough shouldn’t be overly wet but, slightly sticky.
Roll or pat out on a lightly floured surface about 1 inch thick. Cut into rounds using a 2-inch cookie cutter dipped in flour. (note: I used a floured upside-down jelly jar.)
Place biscuits 2 inches apart on the baking sheet. Brush the tops with melted butter. (note: I did not brush them in anything.) Bake at 450°F for 13-15 minutes until lightly golden and puffed.

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recipe from lifeway kefir and notes by friedsig

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I wrote down the recipe, and misread the recipe as “4T butter” instead of 9. (You were right, second grade teacher: my handwriting is messy.) Know what? They were still great. Maybe not as fluffy as the biscuits in the photo, but definitely still delicious. Even though I have never once in my life successfully made “perfect, fluffy biscuits” – this is probably the closest I have ever come. They were so pretty that I wanted to take a photo, but I ate them all before I had the chance. A nice small batch for two, so double or triple the recipe if making for a crowd! These are a bit sweet, so top with butter, jelly, peanut butter, nutella, or whatever you like! I may try biscuits and gravy with eggs next time; not sure if these would be too sweet for that. I’ll keep you posted!

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oatmeal kefir buckwheat muffins

April 5, 2020

1 cup quick-cooking oats (or old-fashioned oats if you like a chewy muffin)
1 cup home-cultured milk kefir (or buttermilk)
1 egg, beaten
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup vegetable oil
3/4c. all-purpose flour
1/4 c. buckwheat flour or whole wheat flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
spices, if you like (I added cinnamon, nutmeg, black pepper, etc.)

In a bowl, soak oats in buttermilk for 15 minutes if using quick cook oats. If using old fashioned oats, soak overnight. Stir in egg, sugar and oil. Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, spices, and salt; stir into oat mixture just until moistened. Fill greased or paper-lined muffin cups three-fourths full. Bake at 400° until muffins test done, 16-18 minutes. Cool in pan 5 minutes before removing to a wire rack.

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adapted from taste of home by friedsig

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Very quick and easy recipe. Not as sweet as lemon muffins (just a half-cup of sugar instead of two cups). I liked the warming spices in this. The texture was almost a little too chewy with the old-fashioned oats soaked for only fifteen minutes, so I altered the recipe to reflect a recommendation to soak overnight. (To be fair, the original called for quick cook oats.)

I think the healthy boosts – the buckwheat flour and thicker oats – were good choices.

My other note? If you’re using sour kefir you cultured a long time ago, shaking the clumpy stuff won’t be enough. Strain or mash the clumps out, or else you will get little bitter pockets in the finished product.

Next time, I will:
– try butter instead of oil
– try straining the kefir
– try a more savory flavor profile. Googling “garlic oat muffin” provides no results. Should we make the world’s first garlic oat muffin?
– try cutting the sugar (although they do caramelize nicely where they touch the tin)

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If you’re looking for creative ways to use up your endless supply of chunky home-cultured kefir, I have a similar recipe – an Irish soda bread with oatmeal. More easy no-knead breads? Check out this sweet soda bread, or this savory rosemary and black pepper soda bread if you’re watching your sugars.

If you’re not watching your sugar consumption, home-cultured kefir is great in this super-sweet brown bread.

If you’re adventurous, you should definitely try this kefir-cultured “potato cheese”, but don’t blame me when your kitchen smells… uh…. “cheesy”.

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polpette (Italian vegetarian “meat”balls)

July 22, 2019

Got a lot of stale bread? These are… food.

Zucchini 280 g
Stale bread 250 g
Eggs (about 1 medium) 50 g
Whole milk 60 g
Breadcrumbs 120 g
Basil to taste
Tomato pulp 150 g
Garlic 1 clove
Mozzarella 90 g
Extra virgin olive oil to taste
Salt to taste
Black pepper to taste
(edit: please add oregano or really anything)

– break up the bread and soak it in milk
– slice zucchini into “rather large slices,” heat up some oil in a pan, then fry them over medium heat for about 10 min or until cooked
– using a “robot” (I love Google translate; I am guessing you want to use a food processor) or a fork, mix zucchini with breadcrumbs, salt, bread, and pepper (and basil if using)
– add egg after blending, and blend until homogenous
– form balls of about 30-33 g in weight
– refrigerate for 30 minutes to firm up so they don’t fall apart
– in a separate pan, start garlic (“or shirt if you prefer,” according to Google translate,) and add crushed tomatoes, basil, salt, and pepper
– when tomato sauce tastes great, add balls and melt mozzarella over the the top. cover with lid.

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original recipe from giallo zafferano in Italian and here it is in English, run through a translator

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Okay, these are edible. If you have a bunch of stale bread, this is definitely a way to use it. It isn’t a GOOD way; it’s just a way. Being on a soft food diet, it’s nice having something shaped like a meatball, but you know what else is soft? Good vegan meatballs. I mean, vegetarian buffalo “meatballs” made with white beans are soft. Meatless wild rice and mushroom “meatballs” are soft. These are just straight-up BLAND! The texture is a bit gloopy on day one, and by day three mellow to a sort of gluey, gummy mess. So, the taste is bad. The texture? Also bad.

The only way I can recommend these is if you have a LOT of dumpstered bread to use. PLEASE add sautéed onions or garlic to flavor the polpette. Tagged “waste not,” because this might keep some bread out of the landfill. Tagged “soft food” because I ate these with a temporary crown, and it didn’t hurt. Ecstatic to use the “nope” tag for the first time in a year. This recipe could be adjusted to be more flavorful, but right now, these polpette are a solid nope.

This is solid proof that everyone creates a nightmare in the kitchen sometimes. Everyone occasionally ends up with a week’s worth of glue-balls. Jump in, try something new, and if it turns into paste, make something better next week!

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new york style pizza crust

April 22, 2019

Without question my favorite pizza crust recipe of all-time.

22 1/2 ounces (about 4 1/2 cups) bread flour, plus more for dusting
1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
.35 ounces kosher salt (about 3 teaspoons)
2 teaspoons instant yeast
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
15 ounces lukewarm water

recipe by Kenji @ serious eats

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The recipe was written for a food processor. I’ll include my adaptations.

1. Combine flour, sugar, salt, and yeast in bowl of food processor. Pulse 3 to 4 times until incorporated. Add olive oil and water. Run food processor until mixture forms ball that rides around the bowl above the blade, about 15 seconds. Continue processing 15 seconds longer. (Or, if you’re like me and you don’t have a working food processor, just combine the ingredients with your hands in a huge bowl.)

2. Transfer dough ball to lightly floured surface and knead once or twice by hand until smooth ball is formed. It should pass the windowpane test. (If you don’t have a food processor, knead by hand until it passes the windowpane test, usually 8 to 15 minutes depending on humidity and flour used. Mine took 13 minutes.) Divide dough into three even parts and place each in a covered quart-sized deli container or in a zipper-lock freezer bag. (Each chunk fits perfectly in a big yogurt container.) Place in refrigerator and allow to rise at least one day, and up to 5.

3. At least two hours before baking, remove dough from refrigerator and shape into balls by gathering dough towards bottom and pinching shut. Flour well and place each one in a separate medium mixing bowl. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and allow to rise at warm room temperature until roughly doubled in volume.

4. 1 hour before baking, adjust oven rack with pizza stone to middle position and preheat oven to 500°F. Turn single dough ball out onto lightly flour surface. Gently press out dough into rough 8-inch circle, leaving outer 1-inch higher than the rest. Gently stretch dough by draping over knuckles into a 12 to 14-inch circle about 1/4-inch thick. Transfer to sheet pan or pizza peel/stone.

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Nothing to say about this crust except, yes, it’s perfect. I cut the salt to just one teaspoon, but otherwise followed it exactly. It definitely had a funky taste without enough salt, so maybe try 2t salt if you’re going for a lower-sodium adaptation. Otherwise, just keep it at the 3t from the original recipe.

Perfect for all your favorite pizzas.

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sourdough quickbread

May 23, 2018

How do you use the extra starter from rye bread? For dessert?

Strangely, this comes from r/Sourdough, but I read the recipe on Bakers and Best.

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⅓ C butter, room temperature
½ C sugar
1 egg
1 C unfed sourdough starter
1 tsp vanilla
2 C AP flour
1 tsp baking powder
½ tsp baking soda
¾ tsp salt

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350 F.
In a small bowl use a fork to cream together the butter and sugar. Once combined add in the egg, starter, and vanilla. Mix until combined.
In a separate bowl mix together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt.
Add the flour mixture to the starter mixture, stirring just until blended. If the batter is too thick add water 1 tsp at a time until it can be easily stirred.
Pour batter into greased loaf pan; let rest for 15 to 20 minutes.
Bake at 350F until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, about 40 minutes.

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Like most quickbreads from zucchini bread to Irish soda bread, the texture is a bit crumbly and dense. It looks just like a beer bread made with a light beer (which I’d recommend). Unlike beer bread, though it has enough sugar in it that it tasted weird with artichoke hearts and poached eggs. So this is a good dessert, but not a dinner bread.

Using a non-onion sourdough might make this a really interesting sweet and sour dessert. I really would not recommend using onion caraway rye starter for this recipe. It’s not as terrible as I feared it could be – the rye actually gives a really interesting flavor to the quickbread, enough that I’d consider using a rye and apf blend for dessert again. But not ideal with raw onions.

If you like a dessert, give this a try! If you want a quickbread with a savory taste, this rosemary and brown butter soda bread has been my go-to recipe this year. If you want something a little more neutral, this Irish oatmeal soda bread recipe is a great not-quite sweet-or-savory oatmeal bread. And if you love dessert-y quickbreads, this molasses brown bread I just discovered is pretty awesome, and this sweet mini lemon bread was a huge hit with my poetry class!

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bauernbrot (healthy buckwheat rye bread)

May 20, 2018

It’s…. healthy. Really interesting recipe:

bauernbrot

bauernbrot – Austrian buckwheat and rye loaf – @ friedsig

RYE STARTER (sauerteig):

2 medium onions, coarsely chopped
4 cups rye flour
3.5 c warm water
2 packages dry yeast
1 T caraway

wrap onion pieces in cheesecloth. combine other ingredients and push the onion-bag into the goo like some kind of weird onion tea.

leave overnight at room temperature, no more than 24 hours. scrape the sour off the cheesecloth. discard onions. good luck getting the onion smell out of your cheesecloth. refrigerate the rest and use for future breads. make sure to feed it like any starter, by removing some, and replacing it with flour and water.

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BAUERNBROT RECIPE:

1 cup rye sour starter (recipe above)
4 cups buckwheat flour
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 package dry yeast
1.5 c warm water
2 t salt
1 T caraway seed (or less, to taste)
1/4 molasses, dark preferred

1 T salt mixed with 1/4 c water (to brush)

in a large bowl, blend buckwheat and all-purpose flours and set aside.

in another large bowl, dissolve yeast in 1.5 c warm water and add 2 cups of the buckwheat-apf mix. beat with a wooden spoon or mixer until smooth and porridge-like.

cover bowl and let stand 1.5 hours at room temperature.

stir down dough and add starter, 2 t salt, caraway, and molasses. add remaining flour til dough pulls away from the bowl. don’t add too much flour. this bread is dense enough!

knead 8 mins.

divide into two loaves. set them on a cookie sheet. brush tops with water and let sit 40 mins.

preheat oven to 350.

brush loaves with saltwater, put in oven. brush loaves every 10 mins with saltwater.

bake about 40 mins or until a toothpick inserted into the loaves comes out clean.

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from Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads by Bernard Clayton

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wow! what a healthy tasting bread! dense and dark! the salt crust is like a pretzel party on the outside! this is not a loaf for the faint of heart. give this a shot if you like hearty, healthy, winter-y, peasant-loaf-type breads. it reminds me a bit of those wildly dense “fitness breads” in the german and polish markets. it’s a little much for me. if you love sweet, soft white breads, you might find yourself trying to give away the second loaf. but if you love heavy, hearty breads, trying to get more whole grains into your diet, wanting to stay fuller longer (seriously! one slice and i’m full,) or looking for something really different, this is the bread for you!

best of all, buckwheat is gluten-free (although the bread calls for all-purpose flour too and therefore the bread itself contains gluten). buckwheat is high in fiber and low to medium on the glycemic index, which makes it suitable for some people who cannot eat white bread. it’s also high in magnesium, manganese, thiamin, B6, and many other vitamins and minerals.

good with a strong sandwich spread, like a creamy balsamic, with tomatoes.
good with strong cheese.
good for teatime sandwiches with butter and radish, or ham and cheese.
and strangely good for dessert with a simple homemade compound butter of sweetened sorghum molasses and a pinch of cinnamon mixed into unsalted butter.

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baked brown bread

April 26, 2018

another gem from the Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads! he says this is just the same as boston brown bread, but baked instead of steamed in a coffee can.

1/2 cup yellow or white cornmeal
1.5 c all purpose flour
1 cup each rye and whole wheat flour
1 cup packed brown sugar (note: do not use this much if using a sweetened molasses)
1 cup molasses
2 t each baking soda and salt
2 c buttermilk, or homemade kefir, or milk thickened with lemon juice
1 c broken walnuts

9″ or larger dutch oven or equivalent covered casserole, greased

to a large bowl, add the cornmeal, rye, whole wheat, and all purpose flours. add brown sugar, molasses, baking soda, and salt. pour in buttermilk and mix well. stir in walnuts.

pour mixture into dutch oven. cover. DO NOT PREHEAT THE OVEN. when dutch oven is inside your cold oven, turn it on to 350 and bake for about an hour. test for doneness like brownies: stick a toothpick or wood skewer into the middle and if crumbs cling to the toothpick, cook the bread longer.

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from Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads

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wow! not sure how this would taste without the weird local sorghum molasses i used, which is heavily sweetened (but was the only choice of molasses under $8 at the co-op, haha). if you are using some molasses like this, cut down on the sugar by quite a bit. this came out as sweet as banana bread. the rye flour and whole wheat flour are almost undetectable – at least, when masked by that much sugar. this recipe makes one giant loaf of beautiful brown bread. i’ll cut this loaf in half next time because it was enough to eat every day for a week and still give half away. everyone who tried it loved it. if you don’t feel like steaming your bread in a coffee can, and you have a big dutch oven, and you want something almost like banana bread but not quite, give this a try!

next time, i will
– add the whole cup of walnuts
– cut the recipe in half
– cut down the brown sugar or use unsweetened molasses

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english oatmeal bread

April 23, 2018

thanks so much to Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads – my new favorite bread book! if you have a favorite bread book, leave it in the comments!

2 cups rolled oats / oatmeal
2 cups milk
1 package yeast
2 T butter, room temperature
2 t salt
1 c whole wheat flour
2 c bread flour or unbleached flour
1 egg, beaten, mixed with 1 T water

(this makes 2 loaves; cut in half for one loaf)

soak oatmeal in milk for 2 hours

stir yeast into oatmeal mixture, add butter, salt, and whole wheat flour. beat by hand 100 strokes or in an electric mixer at medium speed. add 1/2 c white flour and continue beating for two minutes.

stir in balance of flour, 1/2 c at a time. the dough will be a rough, shaggy mass that cleans the sides of the bowl. if it is slack and moist, and sticks to the fingers, sprinkle with a little extra flour. (NOT TOO MUCH – I ADDED TOO MUCH!)

knead 8 mins. “occasionally change the kneading rhythm by raising the dough above the table and crashing it down hard against the surface. wham!

place dough in mixing bowl and pat with buttered fingers to keep the surface from crusting. cover the bowl and rise to twice its original size, about 1.5 hours. or poke – dent remains when dough is risen.

punch down, shape into two loaves. second rise: til doubled, about 45 minutes.

brush tops with egg wash and/or sprinkle with oats on top.

preheat oven to 400 20 mins before baking

bake in the hot oven 30 mins, reduce heat to 350, and continue baking another 20 to 30 minutes

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thanks again to Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads for this great recipe – i really recommend this book for anyone who wants three hundred new recipes to try!

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i made every possible user error with this bread. my yeast was dead, so it didn’t rise, and i added way too much flour to the dough. it was still edible despite its outerworldly denseness, so i’m definitely going to give this another shot with some living yeast soon.

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don’t use IPAs in your honey beer bread (and how to save your bread if you do)

March 4, 2017

a basic, six-ingredient quickbread – no breadmaking experience, no yeast, no kneading – just hot, fresh bread that anyone could make in less than an hour!

honey beer bread

3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup honey (or 2T sugar and 2T honey)
1 bottle (12 ounces) beer (not an IPA!)
4 tablespoons (half stick) butter, melted

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease a 9 x 5 x 3-inch bread pan.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt until combined. Slowly pour the beer and honey into the flour mixture, and stir until combined. (If the honey is too solid, you can put the glass jar into a small saucepan with a little water to soften the honey, or microwave it!)

Pour half of the melted butter into the bottom of the loaf pan, and tilt the pan around until a layer of butter covers the sides and bottom of the pan. Then add the batter to the pan in an even layer, and brush the rest of the butter around evenly on top of the batter.

Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, until the top of the bread is golden brown and a toothpick or knife inserted in the middle comes out clean. Serve immediately.

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from gimme some oven

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Don’t use a super-bitter IPA – the bread will turn out extremely bitter! If you make this mistake, though, it’s easy to fix – just eat it with a sweet spread! The sweetness cuts the bitterness. Try jam, nutella, sweetened peanut butter, or maple syrup. If you want a fancy spread to cut the bitterness, you can mix honey, maple syrup, or sugar into anything from cream cheese to mashed-up avocado. You can even mix maple syrup or honey into softened butter for some fancy “maple butter” or “honey butter” – it’s perfect on bread and you’ll find plenty of other uses for it, too. If you’re watching your sugar, make sure to use a mild beer – nothing too hoppy. A cheap beer works great for beer bread. If you used a mild beer, you can top this bread with anything from hummus to deli meats, just like any other bread. Enjoy!

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oatmeal brown butter pancakes

October 29, 2016

cut in half for one or two people.

6 ounces (about 1 cup) steel cut oats
2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter
5 ounces (about 1 cup) all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 1/4 ounces (about 3 tablespoons) sugar
2 large eggs
16 ounces (about 2 cups) home-cultured kefir or buttermilk
Vegetable oil, for cooking
maple syrup to serve (optional)

brown the steel cut oats in a pan until they smell golden. shake/stir often. let cool, and blend into flour.

in still-hot pan, brown 2 T of butter.

in large bowl, combine all dry ingredients. in small bowl, beat all wet ingredients.

mix until just combined but a bit lumpy, and fry yourself up some pancakes.

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recipe by seriouseats

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recommended! the pancakes have a caramel flavor from the toasted oats and brown butter. great way to use some of a never-ending supply of home-cultured kefir.