Archive for the ‘meat’ Category

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quick 15 minute cider-dijon pork chops

December 4, 2017

this recipe by curtis stone is perfect for a weeknight meal.

2 pork chops
salt and pepper
splash of olive oil
1/2 c apple cider or apple juice [or apple-cider vinegar if you like a super sour sauce]
1/2 T Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, cut into 2 pieces

season chops with salt and pepper

pan-fry over med-high heat for ~ 5 mins per side, or til golden brown
(i used bone-in porkchops, defying the recipe, and they still only needed about six minutes per side)

leave heat on, lower to a simmer, remove pork chops, then add apple cider, mustard, and butter to the pan to make a pan sauce, and reduce til delicious

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from epicurious.com

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i roasted peppers whole as a side dish because i was too lazy to chop up sweet potatoes and apples. roasted peppers taste great with this! you could serve the chops over a bed of salad and couscous for a complete meal ready in fifteen minutes. i never make a vinaigrette pan sauce for meat, but this was super easy, fast, and delicious. i used apple cider vinegar, which i would definitely do again, but that much vinegar might give you heartburn, so maybe half cider and half vinegar would be ideal. this is a great autumnal recipe, even if you’re too lazy to roast the sweet potatoes and apples like me.

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dan dan noodles (dandanmian)

December 10, 2016

i can’t stop eating these noodles because they taste so good.

but, i can’t stop crying.

they’re so, so spicy.

did you ever make something that tasted so good despite it being too spicy, but you were determined to power through it, and you ended up with tears streaming down your face?

that’s me today.

this chili oil is great – a nice change of pace from la jiao jiang with sichuan flavors like star anise and cinnamon.

sichuan dishes heavy on the peppercorns are known as “numbing” – and this one is ~definitely~ numbing. as in, my mouth is completely numb and tingly… and i keep going back for more.

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i modified this recipe from woks of life. one of the main and most important parts of dan dan noodles are the pickled chinese mustard greens. it’s not really dan dan noodles without sui mi ya cai. so, maybe i should call this something different, because i didn’t use any. don’t fear if you can’t get them – these noodles are amazing even without the greens. next time i’ll plan this a little better and get some sui mi ya cai… or at least get some bok choy to get some nutrients in there and, and to help cool the fire. and a larger bottle of antacids.

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MAKE THE CHILI OIL
2 tablespoons Sichuan peppercorns
1 inch-long piece of Chinese cinnamon (gui-pi) [i used whatever cinnamon i have]
2 star anise
1 cup oil
1/4 cup crushed red pepper flakes

In a small pot, add the Sichuan peppercorns, cinnamon stick, star anise, and oil. Over medium low heat, slowly heat to 325 degrees Fahrenheit, and then turn off the heat. Wait 6-7 minutes, then remove the peppercorns, cinnamon stick, and star anise with a slotted spoon.
Add the crushed red pepper flakes and allow them to steep in the hot oil. It should start smelling fragrant, almost like popcorn. Allow the oil to cool. This makes more chili oil than you’ll need, but you’ll be glad to have it on hand for use in other dishes. Store in a glass jar and keep refrigerated.

MAKE THE MEAT
3 teaspoons oil
8 oz. ground pork
2 teaspoons sweet bean sauce or hoisin sauce
2 teaspoons shaoxing wine (or cooking sherry)
1 teaspoon dark soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon five spice powder
1/3 cup sui mi ya cai (i left this out)

In a wok, heat a teaspoon of oil over medium heat, and brown the ground pork. Cook til partially crispy.

Add the sweet bean sauce, shaoxing wine, dark soy sauce, and five spice powder. Cook until all the liquid is evaporated. Set aside. Heat the other 2 teaspoons of oil in the wok over medium heat, and sautee the sui mi ya ci (pickled vegetables) for a few minutes. Set aside.

MAKE THE SAUCE
2 tablespoons sesame paste (tahini)
3 tablespoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons sugar
1/4 teaspoon five spice powder
1/2 teaspoon Sichuan peppercorn powder (we ground whole Sichuan peppercorns in a mortar and pestle)
1/2 cup of your prepared chili oil [HEY IF YOU ARE USING 9 OZ OF PASTA PLEASE DON’T USE A HALF-CUP UNLESS YOU LIKE THINGS VERY, VERY HOT, MAYBE USE LESS THAN HALF, SERIOUSLY THIS CHILI OIL CAME OUT SO, SO HOT]
2 cloves garlic, very finely minced
¼ cup hot cooking water from the noodles

Mix together all the ingredients. Taste and adjust seasoning if you like.

PUT IT TOGETHER
cook about a pound of cu mian (Shanghai-style noodle,) fresh soft medium-thickness white noodles from an Asian marketplace, or udon noodles. Don’t forget the cooking water for the sauce! Steam bok choy or whatever other greens you have. Grab your bowl and add sauce to the bottom, then noodles, then greens and pork. Top with scallions, and peanuts that you fried up in some oil.

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modified from the woks of life

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may end up adding this to the “favorites” list after i make it a few more times with so, so, so much less chili oil. and so much less heartburn.

tastes like something magical, just as it sounds – sweet, very hot, lots of textures – just what street food should be!

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bourbon chicken liver pâté

August 17, 2016

“Pâté” feels pretentious, but chicken liver is less than half the price of hamburger meat.

I eat organ meats because:
they’re cheap
they’re delicious
it reduces waste
they’re nutritious (one serving is 280% of your daily need for vitamins A and B12)
did I mention they are cheap?

If you do eat meat, I highly recommend you give chicken liver a try. It’s so quick to cook, and very easy.

One of my favorite preparations has never made it onto friedsig, so here we go: a modification of the classic bourbon chicken liver pâté. This one is modified from epicurious.

– Heat a cast iron pan with about 1.5 T butter, or however much you like. (They say half a stick.)
– Saute a medium onion over medium-low til it caramelizes.
– Add a minced clove of garlic.
– Add one container (~1 lb) of rinsed chicken livers. (Pick off the little globs of fat if you want, but leave some on if you went light on the butter.)
– Saute about 4 minutes on one side, then flip.
– Add lots of fresh or a little dried sage and thyme. Add salt, pepper, and a pinch of nutmeg. Stir and add 2 T bourbon.
– Make sure each piece has been cooked on both sides when stirring.
– Cut one of the biggest livers in half. If it’s no longer bloody, mostly cooked, but still pink in the middle, it’s perfect. Don’t overcook – 8 minutes should be plenty.
– Blend in a blender or food processor. Do NOT add the liquid unless you want a drinkable pate – just the liver and onions. You can add the liquid as needed to blend into a thick consistency. I like to add a dash of heavy cream, but that is optional. Or, like epicurious suggests, scoop it into tiny bowls and add a little melted butter over the top.

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modified from epicurious

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You can serve this as a dip with cut up veggies, crackers, or toasts. You can use this as a sandwich spread – great with lots of fresh greens and herbs. You can roll this up in greens and make it into finger food. You can add a little to make a sauce richer, or to sneak it in if you don’t like the taste. You can eat it with pasta. You can layer it in casseroles like any other meat. Just try a little spread on a cracker!

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honey mustard chicken salad

August 15, 2016

really fast and easy.

cooked chicken
mayonnaise
celery
honey
sour cream
dried cranberries
pecans
green onions and/or onions
lemon juice
mustard (dry or prepared)
salt & pepper
optional parsley
optional celery seed

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recipe by schnucks

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back to basics. adding this to my chicken salad rotation for the fall, along with chicken salad with spinach, apple, and dill, and coconut lime chicken salad.

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bobotie (south african curry meat casserole)

April 18, 2016

this is super sweet, with absolutely no processed sugars. if you like that kind of thing, it’s totally worth the effort this requires. it was one of my favorite meals when i first learned to cook, but i just made it tonight for the first time in many years. you can cut the sweetness by leaving out the raisins, and using the sourest apples you can find.

the meaty part comes out soft from the apples, and the topping is somewhere between a custard and fluffy scrambled eggs. if you are craving sweet takeout food, like general tso’s chicken or st. louis-style bbq, then you should give this a try instead.

my housemate dislikes apples, raisins, and sweet dinners, but he said this was delicious.

also, it’s extremely fun to say.

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minced lamb or beef, or a mixture of the two [the recipe doesn’t specify how much to use. i used one package, about 1.5 lbs raw]
butter, vegetable oil
2 onions, chopped
2 ml (1/2 teaspoon) crushed garlic
15 ml (1 tablespoon) curry powder
5 ml (1 teaspoon) ground turmeric
2 slices bread, crumbled
60 ml (1/4 cup) milk
finely grated rind and juice of 1/2 small lemon
1 egg
5 ml (1 teaspoon) salt, milled black pepper
100 g (3 ounces) dried apricots, chopped
1 Granny Smith apple peeled, cored and chopped
60 ml (1/4 cup) sultanas (golden raisins)
50 g (1 1/2 ounces) slivered almonds, roasted in a dry frying pan
6 lemon, orange, or bay leaves

TOPPING
250 ml (1 cup) milk
2 eggs
2 ml (1/2 teaspoon) salt

Set the oven at 160°C (325°F). Butter a large casserole. Heat butter and oil in a saucepan and fry the onion and garlic until translucent. Stir in the curry powder and turmeric, and cook briefly until fragrant. Remove the pot from the heat.
Mix in the (raw) minced meat. Mix together the crumbs, milk, lemon rind and juice, egg, salt, pepper, apricots, apple, sultanas (golden raisins) and almonds and mix in. Pile into the casserole and level the top. Roll up the leaves and bury them at regular intervals. Seal with foil and bake for 1 1/4 hours. Increase the oven temperature to 200°C (400°F). Mix together the topping milk, eggs and salt (you may require extra topping if you’ve used a very large casserole), pour over and bake uncovered for a further 15 minutes until cooked and lightly browned. Serve with yellow rice.

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from epicurious

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guinness beef stew with potatoes

February 7, 2016

not a bad way to spend a lazy cold weekend when you want the oven on all day. this soup is everything you are picturing – rich, hearty, and dark. it’s the only meaty dish dark enough to rival my vegan chipotle chocolate chili.

 

1 cup homemade chicken stock
1-3 lbs. boneless beef chuck roast, or any stew beef cut into smallish stew-y bits
3 large carrots, one just cut in half, and 2 cut into large dice
2 parsnips, one just cut in half, and one cut into large dice
8 oz – 1 lb small, waxy potatoes
4 peeled medium onions, 2 cut in half, and 2 cut into large dice
3 crushed cloves of garlic
1 oz bittersweet chocolate (about a small handful)
2 bottles or cans of dark, rich beer, like a stout or porter
sprigs of fresh thyme, parsley, and bay leaf (optional)
1 T fish sauce
1 T worcestershire sauce
1 T soy sauce
handful of flour
neutral veg oil, like canola
salt and pepper

preheat oven to 275. heat a dutch oven over medium-high heat on the stovetop, with a T or two of veg oil. wait til it’s hot. brown meat over a medium-high flame, about 10 min, turning regularly.

remove meat. add just the halved carrot, onion, and parsnip, along with garlic, and brown 4 min or so.

lower heat and add stock, beer, fish sauce, soy sauce, worcestershire, and herbs.

cut meat into stew-sized pieces and roll in flour. add to dutch oven, and bake the whole thing partially covered for 30 minutes. then stir, and bake for another 30 minutes.

then add potatoes and bake for another 30 minutes.

on the stovetop, saute the diced carrots, parsnips, and onions. skim any fat on top of the stew, and remove the herbs and the halved vegetables. add diced sauteed veggies to the stew and cook for an additional 45 minutes, or until everything is tender. the lid can be removed for the last 20 minutes.

garnish with parsley, or with sour cream, or hot sauce and tons of crusty bread.

 

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recipe by serious eats: serious eats guinness beef stew & adapted by sig at friedsig

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good, solid stew recipe, but boring enough that i got tired of it before it was gone. good for a “meat and potatoes” kind of person, but there was nothing super exciting about it to me, so i gave the rest to someone (who liked it a lot). maybe it needs something sour to cut the heartiness a little? it smelled great as it was cooking, though, and was really not bad at all.

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chicken salad with spinach, apple, and dill

May 22, 2015

breast meat of 1 whole roasted chicken (stuffed with half a lemon, fresh oregano, and a few cloves of garlic), shredded with 2 forks
1 small package organic dill
1 sour green apple, like granny smith
1 pinch crumbled feta (optional)
1 spoonful sliced kalamata olives (optional)
minced raw garlic and/or minced scallions or onions, to taste
washed raw spinach leaves, torn into small pieces

salt to taste

combine all.

add a bit of mayo, then slowly add enough plain (unsweetened!) yogurt to lightly coat, and lemon or apple cider vinegar to taste
if dry, add a splash of vegetable stock or chicken broth.

chicken salad with spinach, green apple, and dill