Posts Tagged ‘german’


black forest sweet and sour red cabbage

January 11, 2018

My mom and Oma were born in the southwestern part of Germany, near the Black Forest. You can find other Schwäbische Rezepte if you click here. Just realized I never put this recipe on here – wild, because it’s one of the only cabbage recipes I love. Cabbage is not my favorite vegetable, but the acidity in this recipe cooks out the farty taste.

Heat oil or fat in a pot or Dutch oven. If you’re vegan, try coconut oil. I like using leftover chicken fat or lard.

Dice an onion and a sour apple, like a Granny Smith. Finely chop a small head of red cabbage.

Caramelize the onion in a pot or Dutch oven. When almost done, add the cabbage. Saute together for a few minutes.

Add stock (I like vegetable or chicken stock,) the diced apple, a few juniper berries if you have them, a bay leaf, maybe a whole clove or two, and a healthy amount of red wine. (If you can’t have wine, try apple cider vinegar mixed with vegetable stock.) I like a pinch of brown sugar in this, but it’s optional.

You want to braise it in the liquid, so you may have to add liquid as it evaporates. Simmer, stirring regularly, until the cabbage looks cooked and has lost its crunch.

You can also do this in a crock-pot or instant pot. Just caramelize the onions on the stove top for flavor.

It’s great in its vegan form. You can also start with bacon, and caramelize the onions in the bacon grease. Just add the cooked bacon back in at the end.


recipe by my oma and mom


choucroute garnie (sauerkraut and smoked sausage stew)

December 24, 2017

it’s great to have a hearty stew in the wintertime. i love my friend eli’s version of kapusta. but my new favorite pork and sauerkraut wintertime stew is choucroute. (thanks for the recipe, mom!)

here’s my version – a small-ish version. i’ll also include the version you’ll want to make for a crowd.

friedsig’s choucroute

– 1 lb smoked sausage or other smoked meats like smoked pork chop, plus whatever leftover bacon or other meat you have in the house
– 1 large red onion
– 2 sweet red apples
– half a small jar of sauerkraut, homemade or store-bought
– half a small head of red cabbage, mince

– cup or two of white wine, like Riesling
– cup or two of chicken stock, veg stock, or pork stock

in a tea ball or cheesecloth:
– 0.5 t each of juniper berries and whole peppercorns
– 1.5 bay leaves
– pinch of caraway seeds
– 2 cloves
– 2 smashed cloves of garlic

1. (optional) in a large pot or dutch oven, pre-cook the meat, depending on what you use. if using bacon, cook that. if using smoked sausage or pork chops, pan-fry them. remove meat and set aside.
2. in that same large pot or dutch oven, saute your onion in lard, bacon grease, or some neutral oil like canola. when soft, add the whole spices and apple and raw cabbage. after a few minutes, add all the rest of the ingredients, including the meat. simmer for hours.
3. separately, boil up some potatoes. serve choucroute with boiled potatoes and whole-grain mustard.


you can add any meat from short ribs to hot dogs. try varying the meats, adding a pound or two of each kind. check out the epicurious choucroute garnie for a crowd with six pounds of meat:

1 3/4 pounds smoked meaty ham hocks
1 pound fully cooked bratwurst
8 ounces thick-sliced bacon strips, cut crosswise into 1-inch pieces
2 large onions, chopped
1 teaspoon juniper berries (optional)
1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
10 whole cloves
8 whole allspice
3 bay leaves
3 Red Delicious apples, unpeeled, cored, cut into 1-inch pieces
2 2-pound jars sauerkraut, squeezed dry
2 pounds fully cooked kielbasa, cut diagonally into 1-inch pieces
1 pound fully cooked knockwurst
2 cups Alsatian Pinot Blanc or other dry white wine
2 pounds small red-skinned potatoes
2/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
Assorted mustards
Prepared white horseradish

you can also try serious eats‘ version, which calls for 7 pounds of meat, or jacques pepin‘s version with 8 lbs of meat, including hot dogs.

no matter what meat ends up in your choucroute, it’s great served with potatoes, or crusty bread and mustard, or even plain pasta or couscous or rice.



August 3, 2012

in case you were wondering what i’m doing today:
detoxing from last night by drinking tea and eating locally grown fruit, picking up the prize for the writing contest i won, and spending the money on a carboy, airlock, and gallons of juice.


EdWort’s Award Winning Apfelwein Recipe (German Hard Cider) Apple Wine Recipe


Placed 1st in the Cider & Apple Wine category at the BJCP sanctioned Alamo Cerveza fest (out of 11 entries) and took 2nd place for Best of Show for the main category of Meads & Ciders (out of 50 entries).


5 Gallons 100% Apple Juice (no preservatives or additives)
2 pounds of dextrose (corn sugar)
1 five gram packet of Montrachet Wine Yeast

5 Gallon Carboy (I use a Better Bottle)
Carboy Cap or Stopper with Airlock

First sanitize the carboy, airlock, funnel, stopper or carboy cap.
Open one gallon bottle of apple juice and pour half of it into the carboy using the funnel.
Open one bag of Dextrose and carefully add it to the now half full bottle of apple juice. Shake well.
Repeat Steps 2 and 3, then go to step 5.
Pour in the mixture of Apple Juice and Dextrose from both bottles into the carboy.
Add all but 1 quart of remaining 3 gallons of apple juice to the carboy.
Open the packet of Montrachet Yeast and pour it into the neck of the funnel.
Use the remaining quart of juice to wash down any yeast that sticks. I am able to fit all but 3 ounces of apple juice into a 5 gallon Better Bottle. You may need to be patient to let the foam die down from all shaking and pouring.
Put your stopper or carboy cap on with an airlock and fill the airlock with cheap vodka. No bacteria will live in vodka and if you get suckback, you just boosted the abv.

There’s no need to worry about filling up a carboy so full when you use Montrachet wine yeast. There is no Kreuzen, just a thin layer of bubbles. I’m able to fit all but 4 oz. of my five gallons in the bottle. Ferment at room temperature.

It will become cloudy in a couple of days and remain so for a few weeks. In the 4th week, the yeast will begin to drop out and it will become clear. After at least 4 weeks, you can keg or bottle, but it is ok to leave it in the carboy for another month or so. Racking to a secondary is not necessary. It ferments out very dry (less than 0.999, see here)

Apfelwein really improves with age, so if you can please let it sit in a carboy for up to 3 months before bottling or kegging, then let it sit even longer.

Six months and it hits its stride. Eight months and it’ll blow your mind.

If you want to bottle and carbonate, ¾ cup of corn sugar will work fine. Use as you would carbonate a batch of beer.



How does it taste?
It ferments quite dry. Some people have tried different yeasts in order to achieve a sweeter taste. It may take you a few glasses to get a feel for the flavor. It is very reminiscent of a sort of apfelwein produced locally in Germany. There really is no comparable product in the United States. It’s drier and less sweet than commercial hard ciders. It gets better with age and at 6+ months, the apple flavor really comes out.

How do you sweeten it?
Many folks back sweeten it with Wine Conditioner. Wine Conditioner is a blend of sucrose and sorbic acid. The addition of 2-4 oz. per gallon adds sweetness and prevents renewed fermentation. It can be purchased as any LHBS that caters to wine makers. Others will use Splenda or lactose (other non-fermentable sugars). Germans who prefer it sweet (or Suß as they say) will add a splash of Sprite or 7up to a glass. This is the easiest method as you don’t have to make a whole “sweet” batch that way.

What is the difference between Apfelwein and hard cider?
EdWort says, “Most ciders are a bit sweeter. Ciders and Apfelwein are about 6% abv, but I like the little boost I give it with 2 pounds of Dextrose. It adds no body or flavor and still tastes like Possmann’s Apfelwein, only it will kick your butt much quicker.”

Is this like Apfelmost / Apfel Korn?
No. Apfel Korn is a german liqeur made from wheat spirits. Apfelmost is spontaneously fermented with fresh-pressed apples or apple juice. It is probably similar, but the results may vary as a result of the spontaneous fermentation. Either way, Apfelmost is most certainly has a lower alcohol content since the initial gravity is not increased by the use of concentrate or corn sugar.

What’s the difference between apple juice and cider?
Cider is made by pressing apples. Juice is then filtered to remove all of the stuff that makes it cloudy.

Can I use apple cider instead?
Sure! You can use whatever you want. However, there is not enough information in this thread to give you any better details as to how it will turn out. I recommend starting a new thread or ask more experienced cider-makers.

What kind of Apple Juice should I use?
Ideally, you want to use 100% natural apple juice with no preservatives. The only acceptable preservative is ascorbic acid, which is a source of vitamin C and does not affect fermentation. Pasteurized juice is preferred, since it will have less bacteria.

How much will this recipe cost me?
5 gallons of Apfelwein can be made for between 20 and 25 dollars.

What else can you do with this recipe?
Makes a great Grog in the winter time. Take a quart in a sauce pan, add some rum, turbinado sugar, and float a cinnamon stick in it and simmer for a while. Serve hot in mugs. It’ll warm you right up.


brew diary:



leberknoedel (liver dumpling soup)

April 29, 2012

something to make with your stale bread!!


4 chopped, stale hard rolls
200ml warm milk
1 onion, finely chopped
150g liver, minced
a little scraped spleen (optional, acts as a thickener)
2 tbsp marjoram, chopped (this seems like a lot)
1 egg
115ml milk
salt and freshly-ground black pepper, to taste
freshly-grated nutmeg, to taste
1 small bunch or parsley, chopped
2 tsp freshly-grated lemon zest
a little butter for frying
600ml beef stock

Roughly tear the rolls and soak in the lukewarm milk. In the meantime, melt the butter in a pan and use to fry the onion and parsley until soft. Drain the rolls and wring dry then add to a bowl and mix in the onions. Combine with a fork until you have a firm mass (if the mixture is too loose add a some fresh breadcrumbs, if too firm add a little of the soaking milk. Stir in all remaining ingredients (again, add more breadcrumbs if too loose). Take small amounts of the mixture and shape into dumplings. Meanwhile, bring a pan of water just to boiling point. Add the dumplings and simmer for about 25 minutes, until cooked through. Transfer the beef stock, bring to a simmer, then ladle into soup bowls and serve.

adapted from celtnet



dumplings didn’t stick together. hmm. not sure what went wrong.


making of spaetzle

December 26, 2011

❤ ❤ ❤ this is amazing – i just showed my mom and she told me this is exactly how my oma made them. my mom was delighted by this woman’s ultra-thick schwabisch accent.


diy juniper bitters

December 26, 2011


i have infused vodkas before, but never with JUNIPER! this sounds AWESOME!!

2 tbs fresh juniper berries

2-4” rosemary branches

2-4” thyme branches

2 tsp black peppercorns

1 pint vodka

1/4c dried juniper berries

Combine all the ingredients, except dried juniper berries, in a pint glass jar with a lid. Store is a cool dark place for one month. After one month, strain the vodka, discard herbs, then add the dried juniper berries for a double extract. After two months, strain again and you’re ready for cocktails!

see her post and photos here

today i added 3/4 pint of vodka to a jar with many fresh and dried juniper berries, a teaspoonful of smoked black peppercorns, a giant pinch of dried rosemary, a sprig of dried basil from the garden, and a sprig of dried mint from the garden. i’ll be tasting this often – just to make sure it’s going ok…
added a pinch of thyme.
my favorite infusion by far. even better than apple-strawberry-allspice vodka. left in for a few days, it’s an infusion. left in for a month, it’s bitters. a few drops will do. gin-like. wonderful!
forgot to mention that i temporarily gave up infusing vodka with things other than this, because this is so good.


maultaschen – black forest ravioli

December 22, 2011

this recipe is from black forest cuisine by walter staib.

he says this, accompanied by a gorgeous photo of them:
“whenever i think about maultaschen, i am home again. to me, this is the ultimate comfort food. this is my soul food. my mother would make piles of these ravioli in a single disciplined session, taking time and care with the dough and cutting it in various sizes to stuff with the meat filling. maultaschen can be large or small, sauteed as i suggest here, simmered in soup, or cut into strips and prepared like hash browns. sometimes my mother would float them in beef bouillon or chicken stock to make a delicious soup. personally, i will eat them anywhere at any time of day. in fact, when i used to travel home, my mother would prepare maultaschen especially for me and send my father to the airport, plate in hand. as soon as my feet hit the ground, i would begin to inhale them, at the same time thanking heaven that i was in the black forest.”


4 cups all-purpose flour
4 eggs, lightly beaten
4 egg yolks, lightly beaten
1 T + 1 t veg oil
1 T + 1 t salt

1 T unsalted butter
1/2 yellow onion, peeled and finely chopped
1/2 c soft bread crumbs
6 oz ground pork
6 oz ground beef
3 egg yolks
1 scallion, trimmed and finely chopped
1 T chopped fresh parsley

1 egg
2 T water
4 T unsalted butter


1. MAKE THE DOUGH: pour flour into medium bowl and mix in egg yolks, eggs, oil, and salt. knead dough with hands until it comes together and can form stiff ball. rest dough in plastic wrap for 1 hour at room temperature.

2. MAKE THE FILLING: melt butter in frying pan, fry onions until translucent, set aside.

3. combine onion, bread crumbs, meat, egg yolks, scallion, and parsley, and season with salt and pepper.

4. ASSEMBLE MAULTASCHEN: bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil. whisk together egg and water to make an egg wash. roll noodle dough on a lightly floured surface VERY thin (1/16 in) and cut into 12 6-in squares. divide filling among squares, brush edges with egg wash, and fold the four corners of each square into the center, pressing the seams firmly to seal.

5. drop the maultaschen, one at a time, into boiling water and cook for approximately five minutes. remove with a slotted spoon to an ice bath to cool. drain and set aside momentarily.

6. melt butter in a frying pan over medium-high heat. fry maultaschen until golden brown.

serve with potato salad

if you like his recipe, check out the book.