Archive for the ‘condiments’ Category

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beet-walnut dip

February 14, 2016

this recipe from prairierth farm is really similar to binnur’s turkish walnut and hazelnut yogurt dip posted in the early days of this blog. i never tried making it, and forgot about it.

then yesterday, someone from the farm sampled this out, with carrot and kohlrabi to dip. it was well worth the trip. the dip is absolutely phenomenal. a clutch of people lingered by the sample table, staring wistfully at this pink stuff like they were smitten. part of the reason it was so amazing was that all the ingredients were farm-fresh. part of the reason it was so amazing is that this is made of some of my favorite foods!

1 lb beets (4 smallish,) scrubbed
1 c walnuts
1 clove smashed and peeled garlic
3 t sherry vinegar or lemon juice
a few fresh herb leaves, such as marjoram or thyme (optional)
1.5 t kosher salt, or half as much table salt
1/3 c olive oil
1/3 c greek yogurt

boil beets, covered, turn down heat, and simmer til tender, 20-45 min. peel beets.

toast walnuts on the stovetop or at 350 for 5 min

grab your food processor. add peeled beets, garlic, walnuts, vinegar/lemon juice, herbs, and salt.

with motor running, slowly drizzle in olive oil and yogurt.taste for salt and tang.

dip anything in it – carrots, kohlrabi, crackers, apples, whatever you like.

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thanks to PrairiErth Farm in central illinois for the recipe!

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smoked oyster caesar dressing

January 14, 2016

The first tinned fish that I liked was, strangely, smoked clams. While sardines and anchovies always smelled too strong, the smoke flavor overpowered the fishiness. From there, my appreciation for tinned fish grew. I found that, when blended into sauces, I couldn’t even detect the fishiness. From there, I started adding fish sauce to my soup, stew, stir-fry, to bone broth snacks…

I am trying to work up to the point where I can snack on my mom’s herring in sour cream sauce with her. Ty and her sardine sandwiches are a great inspiration. I’m not there yet.

Until then, here’s a dressing that looks ten feet tall. Nothing subtle about this. Sounds perfect.

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2 egg yolks
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1-2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1 3.7-ounce can smoked clams or oysters packed in oil & drained

In a food processor fitted with the blade attachment, or in a blender, pulse the egg yolks, lemon juice, Dijon, garlic, salt, and Worcestershire until thoroughly combined. With the machine running, add the vegetable oil very slowly to make an emulsified dressing. Then add the smoked clams or oysters.

Serve with romaine hearts, lots of black pepper, and pecorino romano cheese for a caesar salad, or pour on anything – it’ll keep for a week in the fridge.

 

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adapted from Justin Warner’s smoked oyster caesar recipe

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edit 1/2016

Well, it’s certainly powerful. It makes me want to try to make a traditional caesar with anchovy to see how it compares. This has been good on mashed rutabegas and leftover turkey. It’s not exactly bad or good. It’s just its own thing. I wouldn’t exactly recommend you serve this to picky guests. It’s… a lot. Really. Very fishy.

I cut the salt in half (to 1 tsp) when I made it, and I love salty food. 1 tsp made it plenty salty. I adjusted the recipe to reflect this. Tread with caution.

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strawberry dressing

January 10, 2016

maybe you are in a part of the world that isn’t frozen – or maybe you’re reading this in the heat of the summer.

this will be an attempt to:
1. break the monotony of my favorite dressings that i can’t stop making
2. bring a little summer to this wildly cold day

also a great way to use up the strawberries in your garden or fridge that are right on the edge of too soft to eat.

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a cup of strawberries, or however many you have
1/3 c olive oil, or other nice dressing oil, like walnut
1 tsp balsamic, or to taste
a squeeze of fresh lemon juice
a pinch of salt

blend til smooth

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from just one cookbook

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quick balsamic vinaigrette

September 29, 2015

I know the world of salad dressing is a lot bigger than classic honey mustard (I do equal parts honey, mustard, oil, and lemon juice) but I always have diy honey mustard ready to use in the fridge, so I never branch out. This week is all about new dressing!

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Essential Balsamic

1/4 c balsamic vinegar
2 t mustard
1 t brown sugar (opt.)
1/2 t kosher or sea salt
1/4 t black pepper
1/4 clove to 1 clove crushed garlic
1/2c – 3/4c olive oil, depending on how vinegary you like it

put all ingredients in a small jar and shake the daylights out of it

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Creamy Balsamic  (really awesome)
make recipe as above, but add 2 T mayonnaise. doesn’t taste mayonnaisey at all – just creamy, sweet, and sour.

Blueberry Balsamic (also really awesome)
make recipe as above, but add a few dried blueberries, crushed fresh blueberries, or a teaspoon of blueberry jam

Strawberry Balsamic
you get the idea, right?

Blackberry Balsamic
mmm

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This is my new favorite dressing. I had it on a salad of spicy greens from the farmers market with sweet grapes, dried blueberries, and cashews. Amazing!

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from inspired taste

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goan coconut sauce

October 21, 2014

Another great recipe from tarladalal! This recipe is for a paste from Goa, in India. You can thin it into a sauce for veggies, fish, meat, or whatever you can imagine!

2 whole medium sized onions (unpeeled)
1 tbsp oil
2 tsp poppy seeds (khus-khus)
26 mm (1″) cinnamon (dalchini)
3 cloves (laung / lavang)
4 black peppercorns (kalimirch)
2 tsp whole coriander (dhania) seeds
3 whole dry kashmiri red chillies, broken into pieces
3/4 cup freshly grated coconut
7 to 8 cloves of garlic

Roast the onions on a open flame till they turn black in colour. Cool, peel, discard the blackened/ charred layer and slice the onions. Keep aside.
Heat the oil in a kadhai, add the poppy seeds, cinnamon, cloves, peppercorns, coriander seeds and red chillies, mix well and sauté on a medium flame for 5 minutes.
Add the coconut and sauté on a medium flame for another minute. Keep aside to cool.
Combine the above mixture, sliced onions and the garlic and blend in a mixer to a smooth paste, using ½ cup of water.

Use this gravy on the same day to make recipes of your choice.
Don’t use fresh coconut if you want to freeze the leftovers. Instead, cool the gravy completely, add 1 tsp vinegar and mix well. Pour in food-grade zip lock bags or airtight containers and freeze. While making vegetables using the stored gravy, thaw and use it as per the recipe. Towards the end, add 2 tbsp coconut milk instead of freshly grated coconut.

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adapted from tarladalal

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red beets with apples (buraki z jabłkami)

October 15, 2014

Doesn’t get simpler than this minimalist sweet and healthy salad. I modified this recipe from The Art of Polish Cooking by Alina Zeranska. If you like beet salads, but aren’t crazy about apples, try this herbed version – beet salad with dilled yogurt.

1 lb beets (boiled & chopped, or canned)
1 large apple, peeled, shredded
1/2 c sour cream or unsweetened plain yogurt
1 T lemon juice
salt to taste

combine & serve (do not heat!)

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adapted from The Art of Polish Cooking by Alina Zeranska

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corn relish (fermented!)

August 19, 2014

I CAN’T WAIT to try this recipe from Sandy Katz!

4 ears fresh sweet corn, kernels cut off of the cobs (or about 2 cups canned or frozen)
4 hot and/or sweet red peppers, chopped (about 1 cup)
1 onion, chopped (about 1 cup)
1 pear, cored and chopped, or other seasonal fruit
2 teaspoons salt

1. Mix all ingredients together in a bowl. Use your hands to squeeze them with some force for a few minutes. This will bruise vegetables and release juices. Do this until the mix is moist enough that when you squeeze a handful liquid drips down, as with a saturated sponge. Taste and add salt as necessary.

2. Stuff vegetables into a wide-mouth quart jar or other vessel. Seal the jar loosely so carbon dioxide pressure that will build during fermentation can escape. Ferment about two days in a warm environment, three or four days in a cooler spot. Once fermented flavors have developed, move to refrigerator until ready to serve; if you let it continue fermenting, sweet flavors will disappear altogether and the relish will become extremely sour. If surface growth develops (unlikely in a mostly full jar), skim off, discard, and enjoy the relish beneath it, protected from the mold.

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recipe by Sandy Katz, published in the New York Times