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hello to visitors from around the world!

October 1, 2012

Since February 2012, these recipes have had visitors from:

Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Bermuda, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Fiji, Finland, France, French Guiana, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guam, Guatemala, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Libya, Macedonia, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Martinique, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Palestine, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Réunion, Romania, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Virgin Islands.

(119 countries out of 206!)

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I am so happy to see you here! Don’t be shy. Please leave a comment! Teach me how your family makes something, or share what you think about a recipe you tried!

I’d love to see a community of people sharing their experiences and preferences so we can all learn more!

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corn relish (fermented!)

August 19, 2014

I CAN’T WAIT to try this recipe from Sandy Katz!

4 ears fresh sweet corn, kernels cut off of the cobs (or about 2 cups canned or frozen)
4 hot and/or sweet red peppers, chopped (about 1 cup)
1 onion, chopped (about 1 cup)
1 pear, cored and chopped, or other seasonal fruit
2 teaspoons salt

1. Mix all ingredients together in a bowl. Use your hands to squeeze them with some force for a few minutes. This will bruise vegetables and release juices. Do this until the mix is moist enough that when you squeeze a handful liquid drips down, as with a saturated sponge. Taste and add salt as necessary.

2. Stuff vegetables into a wide-mouth quart jar or other vessel. Seal the jar loosely so carbon dioxide pressure that will build during fermentation can escape. Ferment about two days in a warm environment, three or four days in a cooler spot. Once fermented flavors have developed, move to refrigerator until ready to serve; if you let it continue fermenting, sweet flavors will disappear altogether and the relish will become extremely sour. If surface growth develops (unlikely in a mostly full jar), skim off, discard, and enjoy the relish beneath it, protected from the mold.

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recipe by Sandy Katz, published in the New York Times

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cold ukranian borscht (beet soup)

August 13, 2014

This is a great summer soup!

When many people think of borscht, borsch, borshch, barzcz, or borchch, they think of a heavy winter stew made with lots of beef bones and potatoes. If you’ve never tried a summery cold borscht, I highly recommend it. Ukranian-style borscht is cool, creamy, and refreshing. Unlike heavy hot deep red borscht with chunks of beef, this pink Ukranian version doesn’t suffer at all when made vegetarian, with veggie stock.

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make your own chicken or veg stock
roast a head of garlic
shred part of a cabbage, one bunch of peeled raw beets, two small raw potatoes, and a large carrot. put some lemon juice on the shredded raw beets.

heat stock and add shredded veggies and roasted garlic, a pinch of paprika, a bay leaf, and a half-teaspoon or so of allspice. add veggie scraps like parsley stalks and carrot tops and remove before serving or storing.

while this boils, make the zapravka in a separate pan. heat some lard or oil and saute one onion. when translucent, add one chopped carrot. when they begin to soften, add salt, pepper, 2 T tomato paste,

cook everything together until it tastes amazing.

when done, add tons of plain yogurt or sour cream, tons of fresh raw dill, minced pickles or pickled peppers, sliced hard-boiled eggs, and juice from half a fresh lemon.

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adapted by friedsig from ukranianguide

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bokharat (arabic seven spice powder)

August 11, 2014

2 tablespoons ground black pepper
2 tablespoons paprika
2 tablespoons ground cumin
1 tablespoon ground coriander
1 tablespoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom

mix and store in airtight container

great on veggies or meat!

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from egyptianfood.org

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dahiwale achari baingan (eggplant in spicy yogurt sauce)

August 8, 2014

Yet another recipe that looks amazing from ãhãram! Aubergines, baingan, eggplant – it’s one of my favorites.

Baingan or Aubergines – 250 gms
Onions – 2 Large
Dahi, Curd or Yogurt – 1 Cup
Ginger-Garlic Paste – 1 tbsp
Chilli Powder – 1 tsp
Turmeric – 1/2 tsp
Saunf or Fennel Seeds – 1 tsp
Jeera or Cumin Seeds – 1/2 tsp
Kalonji or Nigella Seeds – 1 tsp
Rai or Mustard Seeds – 1/2 tsp
Methi or Fenugreek Seeds – 1/2 tsp
Green Chillies – 2
Garam Masala – 1/2 tsp
Amchur or Dried Mango Powder – 1/2 tsp
Hing or Asafoetida – A Large Pinch
Oil – 2 tbsp + 1 tsp
Salt to Taste
Method

In a large vessel, create a marinade by mixing ginger-garlic paste, chilli powder, turmeric powder, 1/2 tsp salt and 1 tsp oil.
Cut the eggplant into 1/2″ pieces.
Mix the eggplant pieces well with the marinade.
Set aside for 10 minutes.
Peel and slice the onions into thin long pieces.
In a wok or kadhai, heat 1 tbsp oil.
Add the marinated aubergine pieces and stir-fry till the aubergine just starts to turn soft.
Take out the aubergines and set aside.
To the same wok, add the remaining oil.
Add mustard, fennel, nigella, cumin, and fenugreek seeds.
Stir-fry for a minute or till the seeds start to pop.
Add the sliced onions and slit green chillies.
Stir-fry till the onions are transparent & turn off heat.
Add asafoetida, garam masala and amchur powder.
Mix well.
Beat and add the yogurt to the fried onions.
Mix & add remaining ingredients.

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from ãhãram!

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dal fry (lentils punjabi-style)

August 7, 2014

This recipe is from from ãhãram!

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yellow lentils/tuvar dal/pigeon peas/gandules – 1 Cup
Tomato – 1 Medium
Onion – 1 Medium
Ginger Garlic Paste – 1 tsp
Green Chillies – 2
Red Chilli Powder – 1/2 tsp
Turmeric – 1/8 tsp
Ghee – 1 tbsp
Mustard Seeds – 1 tsp
Salt to Taste
Fresh Coriander for Garnish

Boil 1 c lentils in 2 c water. Or, soak the Tuvar Dal in 2 Cups water for about 30 to 60 minutes and pressure cook the dal for 4 whistles.
With a heavy ladle, mash the dal completely.
Chop the tomato into fine pieces.
Chop the onion into 1/2″ pieces.
Chop the green chillies into fine pieces.
In a heavy bottomed vessel, heat the oil.
Add the mustard seeds and wait till they splutter.
Add the onion pieces and fry till transparent.
Add the tomato pieces and stir fry till the tomato pieces are soft.
Add the ginger-garlic paste and fry for 2 minutes.
Add the green chillies, red chilli powder, and turmeric.
Stir fry for 2 minutes.
Add the mashed dal, salt, and 1/2 cup water to the onion-tomato mix.
Mix well and let cook for about 5 minutes.
Garnish with coriander leaves.
Serve hot with jeera rice or rotis.

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from ãhãram (great blog – highly recommended)

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peachy yum-yum (easy peach cobbler)

August 6, 2014

6 peaches
2 T lemon juice
2 T corn starch
1/2 c sugar

boil 1 minute & pour into 2-qt. casserole dish

preheat oven to 400

separately, cut 3 T butter into 1 T sugar, 1 1/2 t baking powder, 1/2 t salt (opt) and 1 cup flour.
stir in 1/2 c cold milk and 1/4-1/2 t pumpkin pie spice or cinnamon.
drop by spoonfuls into peach mixture.
sprinkle brown sugar over the top and bake at 400 for 25-30 min.

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i forgot to write down the name of this (“peach cobbler”). i rushed over to a friend’s with it. when they asked me what it was called, i said “peachy yum-yum” without thinking about it.

the cobbler is like biscuit dough. the peach syrup that forms from cooking the peaches for just one minute is thick, red, rich, and habit-forming.

this is a great and easy method for softening underripe peaches. highly recommended, even if you skip the biscuit dough on top and just snack on some peaches and sugar.

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from pick your own: peach recipes

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mango ginger teriyaki chicken

August 1, 2014

garlic
ginger
soy sauce
mango pulp, juice, or puree (oranges work, too!)
rice wine vinegar
pinch of fennel seed
pinch of coriander
sesame seeds (optional)
fresh basil leaves or cilantro (optional)
two drops of fish sauce or splash of worcestershire sauce (optional)

blend everything, marinate chicken as long as you can stand to, and cook as usual (baked, grilled, or pan-fried – it’s all good)

invented by friedsig.wordpress.com

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Very easy, sweet, and lots of flavor. I served it with ghee rice, and basil yogurt (just plain yogurt with fresh basil minced into it) and it was good.

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