Posts Tagged ‘quick’

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miso-glazed fish

February 13, 2016

here’s the original recipe:

tablespoons white miso paste
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons mirin
2 tablespoons sake
1 tablespoon brown sugar

2 (7 ounce) black cod fillets

simmer all but fish together for 3 min, pour over fish on baking sheet, and broil 5 min on each side.

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recipe by chef Nobu Matsuhisa

 

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UPDATE:

Got it! This is one of my favorite fish recipes. Usually I just throw fish on a hot cast-iron, squeeze a little lemon juice on there, and call it good – that’s my typical “fish recipe”.

This is my new go-to fish recipe!

heat the cast iron on medium-high with a thin layer of sesame oil and veg oil

separately, in a small saucepan or frying pan, combine over low heat
(this is more than enough for one small 4oz fish fillet, and would be enough for 2, but any more than that and you should double or triple this.)
1T water
1 t sesame oil
1 t fermented black bean paste or chili-bean paste (sub. miso if you don’t have this)
1 T sake and 1 T mirin, or 2 T of one if you only have one
1/2 t or so of the crumbly onion and chili bits from la jiao jiang (opt.)
1/2 T miso
a few dashes of liquid ginger or a little minced fresh ginger
1/2 t black sesame paste (opt., if you like it sweet, or a pinch of brown sugar)

stir often and cook down for about 3 minutes, until thickened.

throw (defrosted) fish into cast iron. let cook for a minute or so, then pour a little sauce over the top. cook til done on one side (just 2 or 3 min for a thin fillet) and flip, pouring the rest of the sauce over the top.

serve hot, with rice, or veggies, or basically anything.

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i had this with roasted squash (it’s february!) and it was great. i picture sichuan blistered green beans or a big green salad with this once it warms up out there.

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smoked oyster caesar dressing

January 14, 2016

The first tinned fish that I liked was, strangely, smoked clams. While sardines and anchovies always smelled too strong, the smoke flavor overpowered the fishiness. From there, my appreciation for tinned fish grew. I found that, when blended into sauces, I couldn’t even detect the fishiness. From there, I started adding fish sauce to my soup, stew, stir-fry, to bone broth snacks…

I am trying to work up to the point where I can snack on my mom’s herring in sour cream sauce with her. Ty and her sardine sandwiches are a great inspiration. I’m not there yet.

Until then, here’s a dressing that looks ten feet tall. Nothing subtle about this. Sounds perfect.

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2 egg yolks
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1-2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1 3.7-ounce can smoked clams or oysters packed in oil & drained

In a food processor fitted with the blade attachment, or in a blender, pulse the egg yolks, lemon juice, Dijon, garlic, salt, and Worcestershire until thoroughly combined. With the machine running, add the vegetable oil very slowly to make an emulsified dressing. Then add the smoked clams or oysters.

Serve with romaine hearts, lots of black pepper, and pecorino romano cheese for a caesar salad, or pour on anything – it’ll keep for a week in the fridge.

 

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adapted from Justin Warner’s smoked oyster caesar recipe

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edit 1/2016

Well, it’s certainly powerful. It makes me want to try to make a traditional caesar with anchovy to see how it compares. This has been good on mashed rutabegas and leftover turkey. It’s not exactly bad or good. It’s just its own thing. I wouldn’t exactly recommend you serve this to picky guests. It’s… a lot. Really. Very fishy.

I cut the salt in half (to 1 tsp) when I made it, and I love salty food. 1 tsp made it plenty salty. I adjusted the recipe to reflect this. Tread with caution.

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strawberry dressing

January 10, 2016

maybe you are in a part of the world that isn’t frozen – or maybe you’re reading this in the heat of the summer.

this will be an attempt to:
1. break the monotony of my favorite dressings that i can’t stop making
2. bring a little summer to this wildly cold day

also a great way to use up the strawberries in your garden or fridge that are right on the edge of too soft to eat.

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a cup of strawberries, or however many you have
1/3 c olive oil, or other nice dressing oil, like walnut
1 tsp balsamic, or to taste
a squeeze of fresh lemon juice
a pinch of salt

blend til smooth

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from just one cookbook

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quick balsamic vinaigrette

September 29, 2015

I know the world of salad dressing is a lot bigger than classic honey mustard (I do equal parts honey, mustard, oil, and lemon juice) but I always have diy honey mustard ready to use in the fridge, so I never branch out. This week is all about new dressing!

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Essential Balsamic

1/4 c balsamic vinegar
2 t mustard
1 t brown sugar (opt.)
1/2 t kosher or sea salt
1/4 t black pepper
1/4 clove to 1 clove crushed garlic
1/2c – 3/4c olive oil, depending on how vinegary you like it

put all ingredients in a small jar and shake the daylights out of it

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Creamy Balsamic  (really awesome)
make recipe as above, but add 2 T mayonnaise. doesn’t taste mayonnaisey at all – just creamy, sweet, and sour.

Blueberry Balsamic (also really awesome)
make recipe as above, but add a few dried blueberries, crushed fresh blueberries, or a teaspoon of blueberry jam

Strawberry Balsamic
you get the idea, right?

Blackberry Balsamic
mmm

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This is my new favorite dressing. I had it on a salad of spicy greens from the farmers market with sweet grapes, dried blueberries, and cashews. Amazing!

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from inspired taste

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chicken salad with spinach, apple, and dill

May 22, 2015

breast meat of 1 whole roasted chicken (stuffed with half a lemon, fresh oregano, and a few cloves of garlic), shredded with 2 forks
1 small package organic dill
1 sour green apple, like granny smith
1 pinch crumbled feta (optional)
1 spoonful sliced kalamata olives (optional)
minced raw garlic and/or minced scallions or onions, to taste
washed raw spinach leaves, torn into small pieces

salt to taste

combine all.

add a bit of mayo, then slowly add enough plain (unsweetened!) yogurt to lightly coat, and lemon or apple cider vinegar to taste
if dry, add a splash of vegetable stock or chicken broth.

chicken salad with spinach, green apple, and dill

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best-ever 15-minute baked beans (vegan and non-vegan versions)

May 20, 2015

really easy, fast, delicious way to switch up your bean game. you can take the finished beans and bake them in a low oven for an hour, but i think they’re just fine like this for a quick lunch. don’t let society pressure you into adding bacon and sugar. caramelized onions add plenty of sweetness.

TIPS FOR THE PERFECT BAKED BEANS:
– a long, slow cook, if you have the time. i make these for a quick 15-minute dinner and leave them simmering for an extra hour afterwards so they’ll be perfect the next day for lunch. they’re great when they have been cooking for ten minutes, but nothing can compare to how they taste a half-hour later.
– go a little heavier with the molasses than you think you should. it’s a big part of the flavor you associate with baked beans.
– don’t be scared to experiment. leftovers, like roasted bell peppers, chicken, sausages, and even bits of stale bread, can work in baked beans just like in chili.
– even if you don’t like it hot, don’t leave out the smoked paprika or cayenne – even just 2 pinches can help balance out the flavors.
– don’t forget to undersalt if you use processed meats like sausage or bacon, and oversalt if you’re leaving them out. beans like salt.

VEGAN
– saute onion in coconut oil (or oil of your choice)
– when caramelized, add cooked (or canned) pinto beans, tomato sauce, molasses, vegetable stock, apple cider vinegar, and minced roasted garlic cloves.
– season with mustard, garlic and onion powder, clove, thyme, and smoked paprika or smoked salt if you have it. add veg worcestershire sauce if you like it.
– simmer on low for 15 minutes.
– add brown sugar, maple syrup, or hickory syrup if you like it sweet, or just serve as is.

NON-VEGAN
– if you like your beans bacony, start by frying a few strips of bacon, then remove the bacon, crumble it onto a plate, and set it aside. fry onions in the bacon grease.
– otherwise (this is my favorite,) just start by sauteeing onion in chicken schmaltz (or oil of your choice)
– when caramelized, add cooked (or canned) pinto beans, tomato sauce, molasses, a little vegetable or chicken stock, apple cider vinegar, and minced roasted garlic cloves.
– season with mustard, garlic and onion powder, clove, a pinch of thyme, and smoked paprika or smoked salt if you have it. add worcestershire sauce if you like it. don’t forget salt and black pepper.
– simmer on low for 15 minutes.
– add brown sugar or maple syrup if you like it sweet, or just serve as is.

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edited 2016 & added to “favorites” since i make these all the time

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oven-poached (shirred) eggs

February 9, 2015

I recommend these simple, no-fail eggs (or oefs en cocotte, the heavy cream version). The only downside is cleaning out the muffin tin.

They’re not at all greasy or chewy. This method would be great for making eggs for a large group.

If you need to surprise someone with breakfast on valentine’s day and need something you can’t possibly mess up, this is a good one. Serve with grits or toast if you like, but eggs are never limited to breakfast. They’re great on a bed of greens for lunch, or with mustard and crackers for a snack, or on top of your stir-fry or steak.

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attempt one

preheat oven to 350
pour a little grease into a muffin tin
add a bit of boiling water into each
crack an egg into indentation
sprinkle a little salt and pepper on each egg
if you like, add herbs or cheese

cook 12 minutes if you like over medium – more if you like eggs over hard; less if you like eggs over easy
(your oven may vary! watch them carefully)

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adapted from epicurious