Posts Tagged ‘indian’

h1

baingan musasalam / mughlai baingan masala (indian eggplant and tomato)

August 3, 2016

mughlai cuisine, according to wikipedia, is a medieval cooking style from northern india and pakistan. it’s even influenced by mongolian food. the history of empire is wild.

history, eggplant, and cream are three of my favorite things, so i’m excited to try this recipe by tarla dalal

+

3 cups eggplant
1 to 4 tbsp ghee (recipe called for 4; i used less than half that)
1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera)
1 cup finely chopped onions
2 tsp ginger-garlic (adrak-lehsun) paste
1/2 to 1 tsp chilli powder
2 tsp coriander (dhania) powder
1/4 tsp turmeric powder (haldi)
1 1/2 cups chopped tomatoes
1/4 cup tomato puree
1/2 tsp sugar
2 tbsp fresh cream
salt to taste

the recipe says to start by frying eggplant pieces, but i plan to roast the eggplants whole and scoop out the flesh instead. however you like to cook eggplant, do that first.

in a frying pan, start ghee and cumin seed

add onions and saute 5 mins

add the ginger-garlic paste, chilli powder, coriander powder, turmeric powder and 1 cup of water, mix well and cook on a medium flame for 2 minutes, while stirring occasionally.

add tomatoes, cook 5 min

add the tomato puree, sugar, fresh cream and salt, mix well and cook on a medium flame for 2 minutes, while stirring occasionally.

add eggplant, cook 2 min, serve garnished with cilantro

+

recipe by tarla dalal

+

it’s a keeper! among my favorite eggplant recipes, for sure  [though i definitely prefer georgian-style eggplant stuffed with carrot and parsnip. as weird as it sounds, there is just something perfect about it.]

i haven’t made khatta meetha baingan in years, but i will have to make it soon to see if it’s still my favorite indian eggplant recipe, or if this (and its less souped-up cousin baingan bharta) is the new favorite.

h1

dal makhani (punjabi lentils)

February 27, 2016

nothing against my favorite gujarati dal.

sometimes you just want something that tastes like butter, and cream, and winter comfort.

+

cook 3/4c black split urad dal (if using whole dal, soak overnight) in 1.5c water and a pinch of salt. when cooked completely (better a little overdone than a little underdone,) add half a can of red kidney beans. mash and set aside.

in a heavy-bottomed skillet, heat about 2.5 T butter and/or ghee (i used a combination) over medium or med-high heat. (butter is a lot of the flavor of this dish, so if you’re vegan, i recommend a buttery oil like coconut.) add a teaspoon of whole cumin seed, an inch of cinnamon, 2 whole cloves, a small hot green chili pepper slit lengthwise, 3 cardamoms, and a small finely chopped onion.

cook until onions are golden brown, and turn down heat to medium.

then add 1/2 t ginger-garlic paste, cayenne (1/4 t for mild, 1/2 t for medium, 1 tsp for hot,) 1/4 teaspoon turmeric, and 1 1/2 c fresh or canned pureed tomato. simmer until oil rises to the top.

add the dal, salt to taste, and about 4 T water. simmer 15 min.

stir in a half-cup of heavy cream or, if you’re vegan, substitute coconut milk. simmer about 2 minutes. serve with fresh cilantro and rice.

+

wonderful. definitely a favorite.

adapted by friedsig from tarladalal

h1

borar jhaal (bengali lentil balls in mustard sauce)

January 23, 2016

1/2 c urad dal, rinsed (also called “black lentils”)
1-4 green chilis (recipe called for 4, which seems painful)
1/2 t sugar
1/2 t ginger paste
pinch of asafoetida or onion/garlic power

1 t nigella seed
salt

sauce:
1 t black mustard seed
1 t yellow mustard seed
0-2 green chilis
1 t sugar

soak dal for 30 minutes
drain; put in blender with salt, ginger, chilis, and sugar, & blend
roll into 12 balls & squeeze out water
fry in 1 c mustard oil for 5 minutes – make sure to wait til the oil is sizzling before frying them!
drain on paper towels or paper bags.

separately, mix up the sauce with a little water

heat 3 T oil in a pan & add nigella seed, stir-fry 1 min
add mustard sauce, simmer 10 min
add fried balls & remove from heat

 

+

 

from Mark’s book about Indian cooking

 

+

 

the sauce is not really a sauce. i may not have copied this down correctly. it’s kind of just mustardy water. maybe my mustard seeds are old? balls of fried lentil are always good but i might recommend fermenting it and doing some vadai or some dosai instead of this. i do really like the nigella seed infused oil – i might try that with dal some time.

if you really want to try this, i would say, remember to only add water a bit at a time into the blender. i got the texture right (for once) and the balls held together, but it’s a delicate balance, and many times my vadai came out unfryable (unfriable?)

also just skip the sauce and fry them in nigella seed and mustard seed.

h1

rasse misse rajma (punjabi kidney beans)

January 15, 2016

1 1/3 c dry kidney beans
4 black cardamom pods
2 bay leaves
1 t. ground coriander
1 t chili powder
7 T. ghee
4 dry red chili
1 1/2 t. cumin seed
an onion, chopped
5 t ginger paste
5 t garlic paste
2 small pureed tomatoes
1 t ground black cardamom
1/2 t black pepper

soak beans overnight & simmer with whole cardamom and bay for 1.5 hours

in bowl, add coriander, chili, salt, and 4 T water

heat ghee over a medium flame.

add chilis and cumin and stir-fry 1 minute

add onion, fry 5 mins

add ginger and garlic, fry 2-3 min

add ground spiced & stir-fry 30 seconds

add tomatoes and fry 5 mins til oil separates

add beans & simmer 7 mins

remove from heat. serve with chopped fresh cilantro.

 

+

 

from Mark’s book on Indian cooking

 

+

 

good! i played around with the proportions, so i couldn’t tell you what i actually did, but it turned out just fine. it’s great to have something else to do with red beans besides chili,  baked beans,  other chilis,  and cajun red beans and rice.

h1

my favorite gujarati dal

January 2, 2015

I know, I know… there’s already been a Gujarati dal featured here.

It’s just that I started using a modified version of tarladalal’s dal, and can’t stop eating it.

It’s super healthy, and very quick and easy!

+

Cook a cup of lentils, 2 cups of water, 2 T of peanuts, and half a grated sweet potato. I like red (masoor dal) or yellow (tooval dal) lentils for this, but you can use whatever’s available or whatever you have. All the recipes say to use a pressure cooker, but I don’t have one and it comes out just fine on the stove.

In a pot on your stove, combine the cooked lentils with water and two cups of water.

Separately, in a pan, add ghee, oil, or a combination of both, to 1/4 tsp mustard seeds ( rai / sarson). (I usually use about a tablespoon, but recipes say to use 2 tablespoons. You can cut it even more if you want.) When the seeds start to pop, add:

1/4 tsp cumin seeds (jeera)
1/4 tsp fenugreek (methi) seeds
6 to 7 curry leaves (kadi patta)
2 cloves (laung / lavang)
25 mm (1″) piece cinnamon (dalchini)
1 bay leaf (tejpatta)
2 small round red chillies (boriya mirch)
1/4 tsp asafoetida (hing)

fresh lemon or lime (add at the end!)

If you don’t have the whole seeds, just leave them out and add powdered spices directly to the dal. (Don’t skip the curry leaves or mustard seeds, though!)

Saute until it smells roasted. Add to dal. Also add an inch of grated ginger, a chopped plum tomato (a plop of tomato sauce or tinned tomato is fine,) a dash of turmeric, a slit green chili or two, and, if you like it sweet, grated jaggery or a pinch of brown sugar. Simmer for 10-15 min. Remove from heat and add fresh squeezed lemon juice to taste.

Serve with rice and veggies, or whatever you like. You can top with fresh cilantro leaves, plain yogurt, fried onions, or sour cream.

+

adapted from tarladalal

h1

golden milk

October 22, 2014

one of my favorite drinks of all-time.

i make this recipe regularly, or whenever i can remember to. curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, has been clinically shown to reduce inflammation, and therefore ease symptoms of everything from arthritis to allergies. other studies tentatively show it may shrink cancers, reduce the plaque in the brain associated with alzheimer’s, and calm anxiety. in traditional ayurvedic medicine, it clears skin and regulates blood sugar, as well as reducing inflammation and “assisting the whole female system,” which sounds pretty good to me.

i wouldn’t be so inclined to believe them if i didn’t crave golden milk so much, particularly during the changing seasons. it turns my bad knee into my “not quite as good” knee.

(warning: turmeric permanently stains absolutely everything, including things you didn’t even know could stain, like your grater, your hands, your stove, and your sink. it’s completely worth it.)

+ set a saucepan on low.
+ add two cloves and a quarter to a half inch of cinnamon bark. toast for a few minutes.
+ add 1 cup milk (any milk or milk substitute! some people even use water – but add a drop of ghee, coconut oil, or almond oil to aid absorption. i recommend cow, goat, coconut, or almond milk.)
+ grate 1 inch raw turmeric and 1/4 inch raw ginger into the milk. if you can’t find them raw, feel free to use turmeric or ginger paste, juice, or even powdered.
+ make sure to stir regularly
+ add a saffron thread, if you have it
+ add a pinch of black pepper. this is the only ingredient, besides the turmeric and milk, that isn’t optional! pepper helps you absorb the turmeric.

you will notice a sharp change in flavor when it is done – between five and eight minutes, usually, is all it takes to release the active chemicals.

made with thick, unhomogenized local milk and finished with a spoonful of raw honey, it’s a rich dessert. taken just as is, it’s perfect medicine for the winter blahs, for seasonal allergies, for healing injuries, and as a general tonic to stay well.

probably one of my top ten most highly recommended recipes.

h1

goan coconut sauce

October 21, 2014

Another great recipe from tarladalal! This recipe is for a paste from Goa, in India. You can thin it into a sauce for veggies, fish, meat, or whatever you can imagine!

2 whole medium sized onions (unpeeled)
1 tbsp oil
2 tsp poppy seeds (khus-khus)
26 mm (1″) cinnamon (dalchini)
3 cloves (laung / lavang)
4 black peppercorns (kalimirch)
2 tsp whole coriander (dhania) seeds
3 whole dry kashmiri red chillies, broken into pieces
3/4 cup freshly grated coconut
7 to 8 cloves of garlic

Roast the onions on a open flame till they turn black in colour. Cool, peel, discard the blackened/ charred layer and slice the onions. Keep aside.
Heat the oil in a kadhai, add the poppy seeds, cinnamon, cloves, peppercorns, coriander seeds and red chillies, mix well and sauté on a medium flame for 5 minutes.
Add the coconut and sauté on a medium flame for another minute. Keep aside to cool.
Combine the above mixture, sliced onions and the garlic and blend in a mixer to a smooth paste, using ½ cup of water.

Use this gravy on the same day to make recipes of your choice.
Don’t use fresh coconut if you want to freeze the leftovers. Instead, cool the gravy completely, add 1 tsp vinegar and mix well. Pour in food-grade zip lock bags or airtight containers and freeze. While making vegetables using the stored gravy, thaw and use it as per the recipe. Towards the end, add 2 tbsp coconut milk instead of freshly grated coconut.

+

adapted from tarladalal