Archive for the ‘veggies’ Category

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healthy arugula and sunflower seed vegan sandwich spread

May 3, 2018

i have been on a sandwich kick lately, since i have been baking bread for the first time in a while.

i tried this recipe from leanjumpstart for a cress and sunflower seed sandwich spread.

the recipe calls for:
a splash of water
about a cup of sunflower seeds
a tablespoon of lemon juice
a “bed” of cress
pepper to taste

mixed in a blender and ready to eat.

my recipe:
i added a cup of sunflower seeds, a splash of water, and a ton of lemon juice. then i added a few handfuls of locally grown arugula, because there was no cress at the co-op.

things it’s been amazing in so far:
– tastes like pesto when added to tomato sauce
– tastes creamy on a sandwich with tomatoes and goat cheese and a little mayo-based sandwich spread (mayo, fresh lemon juice, steak seasoning, roasted garlic, a splash of worcestershire, and horseradish mustard) and it was great
– tastes like sour pine nuts mixed into hummus or used as a dip

on its own, it tastes like sour sunflower butter, so it seems like a great way for vegans and athletes and dieters to get some extra protein and a nice kick of sour flavor.

ideas i had for it?
– sandwich spread with roasted red peppers
– caprese sandwich with tomatoes and basil, or goat cheese
– spread on bread with sharp cheddar for grilled cheese
– scooped onto a salad in clumps, like vegan ricotta, on a salad with nuts and dried fruit
– creamed up and added to coconut vegan yogurt, it would make an unbelievable vegan dipping sauce for spicy vegetables
– as a savory note added to some vegan sauce

if you want the world’s creamiest texture you may need an expensive (or at least effective) blender, but a used cheap blender makes a nice texture, partially crunchy and partially creamy, thicker than thick store-bought hummus, which some might find meaty and fun and others might find annoying and seedy. for a vegan sandwich i think the texture it adds is really interesting. i like it. i like it a lot more than i thought i would, and i have been putting it in everything.

as a meat eater i think it would go great with chicken salad with spinach, green apple, and dill on a sweet whole wheat bread.

thanks to leanjumpstart: simply clean eating habits to get in shape for your recipe “garden cress sunflower seeds spread”

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latkes

April 21, 2018

Found my old recipe journal. This one said only, “latkes: 2 eggs, 1 small onion, 1.5 lb. veggies –> 3 potatoes: 1 onion: 1 egg: 2 T. flour”

I’m going to try to interpret that into a recipe here….

1. Grate 3 potatoes (or a combination of beets, carrots, sweet potatoes, turnips, parsnips.. for a total of 1.5 lbs)
2. Make your least favorite person grate one small onion, or half a large onion, because it will burn their eyes.
3. SQUEEZE the mixture and discard the liquid. This will make a much better texture in your latke.
4. Combine these in a large bowl with an egg, 2 T. flour (all-purpose flour or gluten-free flour mixes are fine,) and a lot of salt and pepper.
5. Heat canola or vegetable oil on medium-high heat. Smash latkes thin in the pan so they cook all the way through. Flip when you notice a little brown crust. If they stick, let them sit longer, or turn the heat up a bit.

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This is my classic, go-to latke recipe. I don’t make them a lot anymore, because they’re more effort than crunchy-top bleu cheese mashed potatoes or kartoffelsalat. But there’s something really special about a good potato pancake. If this is too basic for you, or not fun enough to say, try zachary’s falafelatke, a chickpea and potato pancake with a very fun name.

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springtime niçoise style salad

April 14, 2018

niçoise salad is amazing and versatile. ever tried it with asparagus? i can’t get fresh green beans in april, so i made an asparagus niçoise style salad for the spring.

the best part is, none of these ingredients are necessary. any leftover vegetables would be great in here. swap out whatever you have or don’t have, and build your dream salad. it’s a great way to use leftover boiled potatoes.

– 1 bunch asparagus
– medium-boiled eggs (the internet said 7 minutes for medium-boiled eggs. but they came out soft-boiled. delicious but not the same.)
– diced artichoke hearts
– chopped olives (use what you have in the house; they don’t have to be nicoise olives)
– leftover boiled potatoes (i used purple fleshed potatoes that were on sale at the co-op and they were beautiful contrasted with the bright green asparagus and bright yellow yolks)
– (optional: tuna or anchovies, if you eat fish)

dressing:
dijon mustard
apple cider vinegar
a few pinches of minced onions or garlic
any fresh herb you have in the house
pinch of salt and pepper

roast asparagus in olive oil on 425 until it cooked but still crunchy, just eight minutes or so

cut everything into bite-sized chunks, like for potato salad or egg salad, top with vinaigrette, and serve.

don’t be constrained by this recipe. get creative! next time, i’d love to add some radishes for crunch. epicurious says to add raw red and yellow bell peppers, fresh tomatoes, and tons of parsley. david lebovitz uses fresh cucumbers, fresh fava beans, fresh basil, and a half a head of lettuce. others call for capers, celery, salmon and sugar, baby beets….

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recipe modified from all the recipes cited above, created by friedsig, and, mostly inspired by this bon apetit recipe that planted itself into my subconscious

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artichokes and asparagus are two of my favorite foods. here you can eat them at the same time!

it’s nice to have a new quick lunch for the week with just a little weekend meal prep. if you make the vinaigrette and roast the asparagus and boil the potatoes and eggs on a weekend, you can construct this salad in five minutes. also, a great seasonal salad: use tomatoes and cucumbers in an august salad, and asparagus and radishes in an april salad. it’s also nice to have a unifying theme, and feel like, “i am eating nicoise salad,” and not, “i am eating this hastily assembled pile of leftovers”

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moroccan roasted vegetable soup

March 14, 2018

just adding this one ingredient (ras-el-hanout – a moroccan spice blend that’s complex and amazing) to a basic roasted vegetable soup is a total game-changer.

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roast one full cookie sheet of chopped veggies (I did carrots, parsnips, sweet potatoes, red potatoes, whole cloves of garlic, and butternut squash) coated in olive oil

roast an onion, too, or chop it raw and saute it in a soup pot or dutch oven.

when soft, add the roasted veggie chunks and a bunch of stock or broth of some kind, whatever you have in the house. also add ras-el-hanout to taste. the original recipe calls for a tablespoon, but my blend is very spicy with tons of cayenne, and barely a teaspoonful was enough.

when everything is totally soft, after simmering for a while, blend the soup and serve.

you can top with plain yogurt, and/or fresh mint.

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adapted by friedsig from the bbc

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almost exactly the same as the vegetable soup i normally make, but the simple addition of ras el hanout makes it taste totally new again. if you’re bored of the same old veggie soup you always make, definitely give this a try! i always make curried red lentil and squash soup, but coconut milk is getting really pricey, and this is a great alternative!

this is one of my newest vegan soup favorites. i will 100% be making this again soon.

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15-minute broccoli, spinach, and green curry coconut soup

January 21, 2018

green curry paste (1T-1/3c, depending on your preference)
one can of coconut milk
3 cups of water
a pound of broccoli florets, chopped
a handful to baby spinach leaves
fresh cilantro leaves (coriander leaves)
salt and pepper

stir-fry the curry paste
if you’re using real Thai green curry paste, DON’T use a third of a cup unless you have a steel stomach – start with a tablespoon and add more later if it needs it
if the paste is thick, add a little water

when fragrant, add the water and chopped broccoli stems, and boil about five minutes

add the rest of the broccoli, salt and pepper, turn down the heat, and simmer until soft, about ten minutes

add the coconut milk, simmer another few minutes

turn off the heat

add the spinach leaves and cilantro

blend, adjust seasoning to taste

can top with crispy fried scallions if you’re feeling fancy, or a scoop of plain yogurt, but it’s great just as is

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modified from epicurious

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really fantastic. if you love the flavor of cilantro more than you love broccoli and spinach, it’s a great way to get all your veggies. it takes just as long to cool the soup for blending as it does to cook it.

again, seriously be careful how much curry paste you use – i’m in so much pain from heartburn. but the flavor is amazing. perfect way to use up those curry paste packets i’ve had sitting in the pantry for a year. i definitely recommend this recipe.

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black forest sweet and sour red cabbage

January 11, 2018

My mom and Oma were born in the southwestern part of Germany, near the Black Forest. You can find other Schwäbische Rezepte if you click here. Just realized I never put this recipe on here – wild, because it’s one of the only cabbage recipes I love. Cabbage is not my favorite vegetable, but the acidity in this recipe cooks out the farty taste.

Heat oil or fat in a pot or Dutch oven. If you’re vegan, try coconut oil. I like using leftover chicken fat or lard.

Dice an onion and a sour apple, like a Granny Smith. Finely chop a small head of red cabbage.

Caramelize the onion in a pot or Dutch oven. When almost done, add the cabbage. Saute together for a few minutes.

Add stock (I like vegetable or chicken stock,) the diced apple, a few juniper berries if you have them, a bay leaf, maybe a whole clove or two, and a healthy amount of red wine. (If you can’t have wine, try apple cider vinegar mixed with vegetable stock.) I like a pinch of brown sugar in this, but it’s optional.

You want to braise it in the liquid, so you may have to add liquid as it evaporates. Simmer, stirring regularly, until the cabbage looks cooked and has lost its crunch.

You can also do this in a crock-pot or instant pot. Just caramelize the onions on the stove top for flavor.

It’s great in its vegan form. You can also start with bacon, and caramelize the onions in the bacon grease. Just add the cooked bacon back in at the end.

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recipe by my oma and mom

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carrot stew (qorma-e-zardak)

January 6, 2017

super simple and healthy stew from afghanistan. this recipe comes from the book afghan food and cookery by helen saberi.

MY VERSION:

8 oz (about a cup) split yellow peas
2 medium onions, peeled and finely chopped
1/4 c oil
1 lb carrots, peeled and diced
2 tomatoes
1 tsp turmeric
3/4 t ground coriander
1/2 t ground cumin
1 clove garlic, peeled and crushed
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp vinegar
salt and black pepper

soak peas for at least a half-hour. in a soup pot, start onions and oil, then add all other ingredients except sugar. cover with water and simmer for about an hour, until peas and veggies are soft. add sugar and serve.

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HELEN SABERI’S VERSION:

8 oz split yellow peas
2 medium onions, peeled and finely chopped
1/4 c vegetable oil
1 lb carrots, peeled and diced
2 tomatoes
1 tsp turmeric
1 clove garlic, peeled and crushed
1/4 c sugar
salt and black pepper
1 tsp vinegar

soak the peas in a little warm water for a half hour or so before cooking.

fry the chopped onion gently in the oil until golden brown and soft. drain the peas and add to the onion. now add enough water to cover and bring to a boil. add the other ingredients, adjusting sugar to taste. stir well and cook slowly, stirring from time to time, until the carrots and split peas are cooked, adding extra water if the stew becomes too dry.

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from the book afghan food and cookery by helen saberi

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I didn’t soak the peas long enough, and they were still crunchy an hour later. Definitely don’t skip the half-hour soak. Then I didn’t add enough water and the peas at the bottom of the pot burned, so, don’t do that. The flavor was good, but mild. I added the coriander and cumin to lend some depth. Overall, a great choice for someone looking for a mild, healthy, carroty stew. Would be a great choice for someone recovering from a sickness, or a picky eater, as it’s not strongly seasoned.