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ciabatta

November 19, 2010
one of the three most delicious breads i’ve ever made. light and sour. nearly perfect.
For sponge:
  • 1/8 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 2 tablespoons warm water (105°‐115° F.)
  • 1/3 cup room-temperature water
  • 1 cup bread flour*

For bread:

  • 1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 2 tablespoons warm milk (105°‐115° F.)
  • 2/3 cup room-temperature water
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 cups bread flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt

 

 

 

 

Make sponge:
In a small bowl stir together yeast and warm water and let stand 5 minutes, or until creamy. In a bowl stir together yeast mixture, room-temperature water, and flour and stir 4 minutes. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let sponge stand at cool room temperature at least 12 hours and up to 1 day.

Make bread:
In a small bowl stir together yeast and milk and let stand 5 minutes, or until creamy. In bowl of a standing electric mixer fitted with dough hook blend together milk mixture, sponge, water, oil, and flour at low speed until flour is just moistened and beat dough at medium speed 3 minutes. Add salt and beat 4 minutes more. Scrape dough into an oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let dough rise at room temperature until doubled in bulk, about 1 1/2 hours. (Dough will be sticky and full of air bubbles.)

Have ready a rimless baking sheet and 2 well-floured 12- by 6-inch sheets parchment paper. Turn dough out onto a well-floured work surface and cut in half. Transfer each half to a parchment sheet and form into an irregular oval about 9 inches long. Dimple loaves with floured fingers and dust tops with flour. Cover loaves with a dampened kitchen towel. Let loaves rise at room temperature until almost doubled in bulk, 1 1/2 to 2 hours.

Preheat oven to 425° F.

Bake ciabatta loaves 20 minutes, or until pale golden.

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2 comments

  1. I want you to make this for me – YUM. I’d cover the dough with cornmeal, however, instead of flour so that it’ll produce that nice crumbly bite after baking.


  2. […] we’re making a savory sweet potato bread, an armenian sweet bread called CHOEREG, and a ciabatta. i’ll keep posted on how they go – i’m in the boulder area for this month, and […]



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