Posts Tagged ‘waste not’

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perfect poached eggs

April 21, 2013

really into poached eggs lately. looked up how to get the whites to stay together. seems easy enough, and i hate wasting all those bits of egg white!

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Heat the water: Add enough water to come 1 inch up the side of a narrow, deep 2-quart saucier. Add 1 teaspoon kosher salt and 2 teaspoons white vinegar and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Meanwhile, crack 1 very fresh cold large egg into a cup. Use the handle of a spatula or spoon to quickly stir the water in one direction until it’s all smoothly spinning around.

TIP: Use this whirlpool method when poaching a single serving (one or two eggs). For bigger batches, heat the water, salt and vinegar in a 12-inch nonstick skillet and do not stir.

Add the egg: Carefully drop the egg into the center of the whirlpool. The swirling water will help prevent the white from “feathering,” or spreading out in the pan.

Let it poach: Turn off the heat, cover the pan and set your timer for 5 minutes. Don’t peek, poke, stir or accost the egg in any way.

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from tv

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kimchi bibimbap

January 18, 2013

“stirred rice” – rice stirred up with leftovers!

+ last night’s rice
+ any leftovers you have in your fridge – meat, veggies, whatever
+ bolgogi (sweet korean rib-eye cooked with pear,) if you have it lying around. (you can leave it out.)
+ cut-up pieces of raw fresh veggies, like cucumbers, bean sprouts, carrots, or spinach
+ a handful of kim-chi, cut up
+ a fried egg
+ a gojuchang sauce made of 3 tablespoons Gochujang paste, 1/2 tablespoon apple cider vinegar, 3ish minced cloves of garlic, 3 teaspoons soy sauce, 1/2 tablespoon Korean fine red pepper flakes, 1 tablespoon dark sesame oil, and 1/2 tablespoon sesame seeds
+ a topping of dried and salted seaweed

mix together and eat

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based on a recipe from heart mind and seoul

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crunchy-top spicy quinoa bites

December 22, 2012

2 cups cooked quinoa
3/4 cup grated cheese (they recommend gruyere)
2 eggs, beaten
2 green onions, thinly sliced
1 clove minced garlic
1 tablespoon chopped cilantro
1 tablespoon honey
1 1/2 tablespoons sriracha or chili-garlic sauce
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup breadcrumbs (whole wheat or white)

Preheat oven to 350°F
Oil the cups of two mini 12 count muffin pans. Set aside.
Stir all of the ingredients together in a large bowl. The mixture should be sticky and cling to a spoon. (Add more breadcrumbs if it’s too loose.)
Spoon the mixture into one cup. Press down firmly with your fingers. Add more, if necessary, to fill even with the top. Press firmly again. Continue filling the cups in this manner. You should be able to fill 18 to 20 of the cups.
Bake for 15-20 minutes, rotating the pans halfway through. Keep an eye on the edges – if they brown, go ahead and remove the pans from the oven.
Allow to cool for 5 minutes, then turn out on a cooling rack. Serve immediately.

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from leaf and grain

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pumpkin bread pudding with raisins

September 30, 2012

1 cup golden raisins
1/3 cup spiced rum or spiced liqueur, orange or lemon liqueurs like cointreau, or similar
1/3 cup hot water

1 12 ounce day old baguette, cut into 3/4 inch cubes
1 15 ounce can pure pumpkin
4 large eggs
1 1/2 cup blend of milk, half-n-half, cream, coconut milk, kefir, yogurt, almond milk, or whatever you like in whatever proportions you like
1 cup sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ginger
1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice (or mixed allspice and cinnamon with a pinch of clove and nutmeg and mace if you’ve got it)
pinch nutmeg
pinch salt
butter to grease
brown sugar to sprinkle

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Preheat oven to 350 degrees
Place raisins in a bowl and cover with rum and hot water; set aside to soak for 20 minutes.
Grease 6 – 10 ounce ramekins (or bread pan)
Sprinkle brown sugar in the bottom of each buttered ramekin; set aside
In a large bowl combine pumpkin, milky stuff, eggs, sugar, vanilla, spices and salt; whisk together
Toss in bread cubes
Fold in soaked raisins
Divide among the ramekins and press down to level
Bake until custard is set in the center and top is golden, about 40 minutes.
Remove from oven and allow to cool slightly

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adapted from my sous chef is a dog

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not bad hot with ice cream on top, but not my favorite. i prefer my bread pudding a little puddingy, and this was a bit too dry for my tastes. next time maybe i’ll use coconut milk instead of milk for a creamier texture.

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vegetarian welsh “glamorgan sausages”

September 29, 2012

glamorgan sausages are a traditional welsh dish.

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25g/1oz butter
115g/4oz leeks, trimmed, finely sliced (prepared weight)
175g/6oz breadcrumbs (make them yourself by toasting stale bread and crumbling it!)
2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
1 tbsp chopped fresh thyme
150g/5oz Caerphilly cheese or Welsh Cheddar, finely grated
2 free-range eggs, separated
1 tsp English mustard
½ tsp flaked sea salt
5 tbsp sunflower oil
freshly ground black pepper

melt the butter in a large non-stick frying pan and fry the leek gently for 8-10minutes, or until very soft but not coloured.
Put 100g/3½oz of the breadcrumbs, the parsley, thyme and cheese in a large mixing bowl and mix until well combined. Beat the egg yolks with the mustard, salt and plenty of freshly ground black pepper in a separate bowl.
Remove the frying pan from the heat and tip the leeks into the bowl with the breadcrumbs. Add the egg yolks and mix together well with a large wooden spoon until well combined. Divide the leek mixture into eight portions and roll into sausage shapes.
Whisk the egg whites lightly in a bowl with a large metal whisk until just frothy. Sprinkle 40g/1½oz breadcrumbs over a large plate. Dip the sausages one at a time into the beaten egg and roll in the breadcrumbs until evenly coated, then place on the baking tray. Chill the sausages in the fridge for 30 minutes.

fry on medium heat 10-12 mins, turning regularly.

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edit 10/7:

no thyme, parsley, or leeks in the house. subbed in fresh cilantro and mint, dried basil, powdered onion and garlic, and a pinch of coconut powder, and dipped them in corn flour instead of breadcrumbs.

tasted sort of like crunchy fried cilantro bread, and sort of like something weird you’d get at a carnival from the deep-fried corn flour taste. not bad; curious to try them cooked in a real deep-fryer and with the leeks.

great way to use old stale bread. it would be fun for kids, too, since squishing is a required part of the cooking process.

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candied fruit peel (fruites in sirrop, 1597)

September 4, 2012

“A goodlye secret for to condite or confite Orenges, citrons, and all other fruites in sirrop”, a recipe from Thomas Dawson, THE SECOND PART OF THE GOOD HUS-WIVES JEWELL, 1597.

“(1) Take Cytrons and cut them in peeces, taking out of them the iuice or substance, (2) then boyle them in freshe water halfe an hower untill they be tender, and when you take them out, (3) cast them into cold water, leave them there a good while, (4) then set them on the fire againe in other freshe water, (5) doo but heate it a little with a small fire, for it not seeth, but let it simper a little (6) continue thus eight daies together heating them every day inn hot water: (7) some heat the watre but one day, to the end that the citron be not too tender, but change the freshe water at night to take out the bitternesse of the pilles, the which being taken away, (8) you must take suger or Hony clarified, wherein you must the citrons put, (9) having first wel dried them from the water, & in winter you must keep them from the frost, (10) & in the Sommer you shal leave them there all night, and a day and a night in Honie, (11) then boile the Honie or Sugar by it selfe without the orenges or Citrons by the space of halfe an hower or lesse with a little fire, (12) and being colde set it againe to the fire with the Citrons, (13) continuing so two mornings: if you wil put Honnie in water and not suger, you must clarifie it two times, and straine it through a strayner: having thus warmed and clarified it you shall straine and (14) sett it againe to the fire, with Citrons onely, making them to boyle with a soft fire the space of a quarter of an houre, (15) then take it from the fire & let it rest at every time you do it, a day & a night: (16) the next morning you shall boyle it again together the space of half an hower, and (17) doo so two morninges, to the end that the Honie or Suger may be well incorporated with the Citrons. All the cumuing (sic) consisteth in the boyling of this sirrope together with the Citrons, and also the Sirrope by it selfe,and heerein heede must be takken that it take not the smoke, so that it savour not of the fire: In this manner may be drest the Peaches, or lemmons Orenges, Apples, green Malnuts, and (18) other liste being boile more or lesse, according to the nature of the fruits.”

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modern interpretation:

Remove the peel from lemons/limes/grapefruits/oranges with as little of the pith as possible.

Place the peels in water in the refrigerator.

Change the water every day for 5 days.

Drain the peels and place in a pan of sugar syrup (1 cup sugar dissolved in 1 cup water).

Boil the the peels gently for 1/2 hour.

Allow to cool and place in the refrigerator overnight.

For another 1-2 days, repeat.

Drain the peels sift, sugar over them and allow to dry.

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from the Fort de Chartres Heritage Garden, which is from this clump of recipes from mediaeval times

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brown sugar casted chocolates

August 19, 2012

great idea from rise and shine – just press anything into brown sugar to make an impression instead of buying molds to cast chocolates! i’m thinking doll parts. it seems like it’d be satisfying to eat a tiny chocolate hand.

someone commented on the entry saying, “classically confectioners used cornstarch for this, finer texture”

and, unlike plastic molds that get thrown away later, brown sugar can be reused!

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sweet fermented rice pancakes

May 7, 2012

i’m making pak thong kuih – a lacto-fermented rice dessert.

for the first two parts of the recipe, some of the “starter” is removed. what to do with all that extra yeasty sweet rice?

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super fast and easy sweet and sour fermented rice pancakes

from goop to plate in less than ten minutes.

ingredients

+ a fistful of yeasty sweet rice leftover from fermenting pak thong kuih (or substitute leftover cooked plain rice – maybe with a little lime juice? i’ll have to try that.)
+ a fistful of mashed sweet potato
+ two pinches of coconut powder
+ one pinch of corn starch
+ one egg (increase corn starch for a vegan version)
+ a pinch each of fennel, cayenne, seasoned salt, coriander, and two pinches of ginger and black pepper
+ a tablespoon or so of date syrup

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fry on medium heat like any pancake or burger.

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serve with applesauce

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i invented this recipe tonight, and i couldn’t be happier with it! hopefully the honeycomb dessert is good so i have a reason to ferment more rice, because this was a quick, easy, awesome snack!

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leberknoedel (liver dumpling soup)

April 29, 2012

something to make with your stale bread!!

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4 chopped, stale hard rolls
200ml warm milk
1 onion, finely chopped
150g liver, minced
a little scraped spleen (optional, acts as a thickener)
2 tbsp marjoram, chopped (this seems like a lot)
1 egg
115ml milk
salt and freshly-ground black pepper, to taste
freshly-grated nutmeg, to taste
1 small bunch or parsley, chopped
2 tsp freshly-grated lemon zest
a little butter for frying
600ml beef stock

Roughly tear the rolls and soak in the lukewarm milk. In the meantime, melt the butter in a pan and use to fry the onion and parsley until soft. Drain the rolls and wring dry then add to a bowl and mix in the onions. Combine with a fork until you have a firm mass (if the mixture is too loose add a some fresh breadcrumbs, if too firm add a little of the soaking milk. Stir in all remaining ingredients (again, add more breadcrumbs if too loose). Take small amounts of the mixture and shape into dumplings. Meanwhile, bring a pan of water just to boiling point. Add the dumplings and simmer for about 25 minutes, until cooked through. Transfer the beef stock, bring to a simmer, then ladle into soup bowls and serve.

adapted from celtnet

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edit:

dumplings didn’t stick together. hmm. not sure what went wrong.

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what to do with food that’s going bad

April 28, 2012

stale bread, soured milk, mushy vegetables…

just started a tag called “waste not” that will call for foods that are on their last legs, leftover bits and pieces of other recipes, or other things that don’t have to be wasted.

let’s help each other keep good food out of the garbage!!

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any ideas?

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