Posts Tagged ‘lacto-fermented’

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lacto-fermented… musical instrument?

November 29, 2013

This is too amazing not to share.

A microbial instrument, made with the off-gassing from fermented foods like kim chi. It’s haunting!

Fermentophone from Joshua Pablo Rosenstock.

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answers to your questions about lacto-fermentation!

August 1, 2012

if you used google to get here, i can see your search queries.
creepy, right?
but i don’t want to rant.
i’ll just say that one benefit to a total and complete end to all privacy is…

i can help total strangers with their fermentation issues!

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Q:
someone found my page by googling:
“can you ferment mint”

A:
yes!
fresh mint – whole sprigs of any herb, actually – do ferment. use the open-crock method and they can last all through the winter. find a plate or rock that fits well in your vessel to eliminate problems with floating.

prepared lacto-fermented mint condiments are also delicious. here’s a lacto-fermented mint chutney recipe.

dried mint is a good flavor in lacto-ferments, but i’ve found that adding dried herbs can make them spoil more quickly because they tend to leave floaty bits at the surface. not recommended. but it’s your call!

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Q:
someone found my page by googling:
“fermented lime juice”

A:
ferment juice the way you would other juices – as a wine. make sure to use or make an airlock to prevent making fermented lime vinegar – unless that’s your goal. if so, just squeeze limes into a jar and leave it out for a day (covered in cheesecloth or a tshirt to prevent bugs) in the summer heat! don’t use bottled lime juice; it has preservatives that prevent what you’re trying to encourage. i’ve never done this. i have used fresh lime juice as a brine in lacto-ferments a TON, and it’s incredible with indian lime pickle or hot pepper pickle.

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Q:
someone found my page by googling:
“lacto-fermented ravioli”

A:
what?

haha.

i guess you could ferment some flour for a few days and make a sourdough pasta. then you could fill it with lacto-fermented ingredients.

also, whoever googled “lacto-fermented ravioli” please be my friend.

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Q:
“lacto-fermented pancakes”

A:
definitely!
dosai are ground rice and lentils fermented for a day. the flavor is unique and really delicious.

if finely textured pancakes are more your thing, you can’t go wrong with crepes or american-style sourdough pancakes.

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Q:
“lactoferment tomatos sweet pepper botulism”

A:
if you’re worried about botulism, use sandy’s open-crock fermentation method. guides exist – like the master sandy katz‘s elegant write-up, and my quick version.

he outlines an “open-crock” method of fermentation that eliminates the problem of anarobic bacteria (the kind that live in closed containers – ie. botulism). basically, that means you can’t get botulism with the open-crock method. and it’s easy!

as for tomatoes and peppers, i think any jarred food from minced garlic to pre-packaged tomato sauce is at risk for botulism. but think of how often you eat jarred food without a problem!

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Q:
“why lime juice pickle fermented”

A:
because it tastes delicious, it’s good for you, and it preserves.

why NOT lime juice pickle fermented?

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Q:
“is lime juice good for a slow fermentation”

A:
the refrigerator – or a root cellar – is your best bet for a slow fermentation.

but yes, in my experience lime-juice fermented lime pickles are very slow to ferment. my year-old pickles are intoxicating.

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Q:
“if ferment is too close to top”

A:
eat a few bites off the top!

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got a question i didn’t answer?

leave a comment, or try the trusty folks at the wild fermentation forum! (edit 2014: the wild fermentation fb group is surprisingly active and supportive these days.)

or just continue using google!

(there are alternative search engines out there that don’t track your search terms!)

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sweet fermented rice pancakes

May 7, 2012

i’m making pak thong kuih – a lacto-fermented rice dessert.

for the first two parts of the recipe, some of the “starter” is removed. what to do with all that extra yeasty sweet rice?

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super fast and easy sweet and sour fermented rice pancakes

from goop to plate in less than ten minutes.

ingredients

+ a fistful of yeasty sweet rice leftover from fermenting pak thong kuih (or substitute leftover cooked plain rice – maybe with a little lime juice? i’ll have to try that.)
+ a fistful of mashed sweet potato
+ two pinches of coconut powder
+ one pinch of corn starch
+ one egg (increase corn starch for a vegan version)
+ a pinch each of fennel, cayenne, seasoned salt, coriander, and two pinches of ginger and black pepper
+ a tablespoon or so of date syrup

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fry on medium heat like any pancake or burger.

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serve with applesauce

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i invented this recipe tonight, and i couldn’t be happier with it! hopefully the honeycomb dessert is good so i have a reason to ferment more rice, because this was a quick, easy, awesome snack!

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pak thong kuih – lacto-fermented rice honeycomb dessert

May 5, 2012

you’ll have to see the pictures in the original recipe over at table for 2….. or more to see why this seems so magickal. how do single celled organisms turn rice into a honeycombed dessert? this is amazing!

i just started on this one today!!

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combine
100gm cooled, cooked rice
½ Tbsp Chinese Wine Yeast ( 甜酒饼,Ragi, sweet type) [i just used a pinch of bread yeast..]
1 tsp sugar
½ Tbsp water
Mix everything together, keep in a covered container (not air-tight!)
Leave it in a cabinet or cold room to ferment for 48 hours.

(note: started 9pm may 5. ready on monday night, may 7!)

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after 48 hours, weight out 60gms (~1/4 c) &
(use the extra to make some fermented rice pancakes!)

to that 60gm fermented rice, add
100gm (~1/2 c) rice flour
water (just to moisten)

ferment for 16-18 hours
Weigh out 80gm of this & set aside.

(started 10pm may 7, done 2pm-4pm tomorrow)

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in a separate bowl, combine 220 gm. pure rice flour, 30 gm. tapioca or other starch, and 280 gm. water

in a separate pot, boil 200 gm. castor sugar, 400 ml. water, and 3 blades of pandan leaves tied into a knot (or other flavor). pour half into the fresh water-flour-starch mixture. cool the other half before pouring it in. add the ferment and ferment again for 12ish hours.

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add a quarter teaspoon of baking soda to a teaspoon of water. take a quarter teaspoon of that mixture and add it to the ferment, along with a teaspoon of oil.

pour into a greased steaming tray and steam 15-20 mins over medium heat, or until a skewer comes out clean.

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5/13
well, i accidentally became overwhelmed by responsibilities and found myself extending the last ferment by a few days. at first, i kept up with it, pouring off the rice wine on top and adding fresh flour. then i slacked. when i finally checked it three days later, it looked hopeless. it smelled like vinegar, and a few fruit flies had somehow made it under the lid kept loose for aeration. i added rice flour and sugar and a few hunks of fresh strawberries hoping to kick-start it. after only ten minutes, the smell was already sweeter and healthier as the yeast woke up. i poured off the rice wine vinegar and fruit flies, added a little cinnamon, and invented some bizarre contraption with a loaf pan in a steamer basket in a pot with a lid on top. i completely forgot the baking soda and oil, so who knows what bizarre consistency or taste will come of this. i’ve been steaming it for a really long time (20 mins at least) and it’s still sort of gooey but tightening up around the edges.

HEY! IT’S DONE!

AND IT’S HONEYCOMBED!

it has a giant hole in the middle with a wrinkled honeycomb pattern coming from it. the pattern almost looks like a grapefruit.

taste:
distinct sourdough flavor. wild! not at ALL sweet. covering the finished product in date syrup is pretty and turns it into a dessert! the sourdough is much more complex and well-developed than i’d thought it would be after just a few days. really wonderful!

texture:
sticky, chewy, jiggly, jello-y, filled with air pockets, awesome, weird, fun!

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MAKE THIS!

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lacto-fermented mint chutney

December 22, 2011

this recipe is from sally fallon’s nourishing traditions.

mint chutney – makes three cups

2 c fresh mint leaves
1 medium onion, peeled and coarsely chopped
4 cloves garlic, peeled and coarsely chopped
4 jalapeno chilies, seeded and chopped
2 T cumin seeds, toasted
2/3 c almonds, chopped
1 T sea salt
4 T whey
1 c filtered water

place all ingredients except salt, whey, and water into food processor and pulse until finely chopped but not paste-like. place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth glass container (mason jar, etc) and press down tightly. mix salt and whey with water and pour into jar, adding more water if necessary to cover chutney. top of the chutney should be at least 1 inch below top of jar. cover tightly and store at room temperature for two days before transferring to fridge. this should be eaten within two months.

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lacto-fermented squid (ojingeojeot)

October 20, 2011

go see this recipe, with its beautiful photos!

i know what you’re thinking. but i’m going to make it, and it’s going to be really, really good.

basically, you’ll want to carefully clean squid (or fish, or whatever,) and salt it heavily. same as fermenting vegetables! stick ‘em in a jar. she recommends fermenting for a month in the fridge before adding green and red hot peppers, garlic, green onions, ginger, toasted sesame seeds, and a little sesame oil.

check out her recipe; i can’t do it justice describing it here.

the comments are glorious, too, including one from someone who found an intact 3″ fish inside her squid when she cleaned it!

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lacto-fermented garden-fresh salsa

July 28, 2011

recipe requested by sonya!

i made two batches this go-round. one was a little sweeter, with carrot, sweet basil, little cherry tomatoes, a little jalapeno, turmeric, and fennel seed. one was very hot, with a ton of jalapeno, lemon basil, all kinds of heirloom tomatoes, turmeric, and garlic.

but you really can’t go wrong with anything involving garden tomatoes.

cut up your mixture into tiny chunks.

layer this mixture in the bottom of a clean mason jar with salt (coarse kosher or sea, please. it makes all the difference.) press as you go. the veggies will start creating brine as you work. keep going til you get near the top. add a little water and taste it. if it tastes saltier than your tears, you’re done. otherwise, add a little salt.

you can do this open-crock (see this post for more details; basically, you want to put a glass filled with water or a rock in the jar to keep the veggies submerged under the brine at all times) or with a lid on it (please burp the jar twice a day to avoid brining your ceiling)

other delicious add-ins? any fresh herb. any allium (i love onion in my salsa!) cauliflower. fruit. celery. sweet peppers (sometimes i have floating problems with these – weigh them down with carrots.) whatever you can imagine.

my advice? make a lot of this. i never thought i’d find something to replace my great love of homemade lacto-fermented giardinera, but the garden-fresh tomatoes put this salsa in my top three fermented veggies of all-time.

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dosai

March 2, 2011

fermenting rice and beans changes EVERYTHING.

this is one of the most popular requests from my vegan and gluten-free friends. throw some stir-fry on top (or puree it and throw it in the batter!) and it’s a whole meal.

DOSA:

just soak equal parts rice and some small pulse like split peas, lentils, urad dal, channa dal, etc.

after many hours (whenever you remember, really,) grind them to a paste (with water) about the consistency of pancake batter.

put the batter in a non-reactive vessel (glass, pyrex; a bowl or baking pan is fine – just nothing metal) and just leave it on your table for a few hours. no lid. no worries. if you have flies, drape a kitchen towel or plastic bag over the top loosely.

it’ll start smelling yeasty after six-ish hours. ferment it for longer if you like!

season it (we love fresh ginger, garlic, and chilis, and lots of spices like coriander, cumin seed, ajwain seed, cinnamon, allspice, and a little mango powder)
and fry the sucker up like a pancake with plenty of oil.

tricks i’ve encountered to making a perfect dosa:
use LOTS of oil
grind the paste so that all the chunks are gone
thin pancake, high heat
ferment for a long time
don’t flip until it’s browned on the bottom (otherwise it falls apart)

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late february veggie ferments

March 1, 2011

swiss chard stems with garlic, clove, allspice, and mustard seed

very dilly beans

dilly cauliflower

saltwater-pickled garlic and onion

carrot and baby cucumber with tons of dill and laurel

giardinera with carrot, tons of hot pepper, cauliflower, and onion

lime juice fermented hot peppers

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vadai

February 28, 2011

vegan, gluten-free doughnuts that were instantly devoured by picky gluten-lovers.

a perfectly deep-fried, golden-brown, doughnut-shaped vada was not what we got.

although fermenting the batter wasn’t called for in the recipe, i missed fermented foods so much after being away from them for two months that i sat the batter out for a few hours after grinding it.

i’ll try it unfermented some day, but WOW! these were worshipped by my gluten-free housemates. i just treated it like dosa batter, but made it a little thicker.

2 cups urad dal (bet that’d be better than what we used, which was just plain lentils – but they were still outstanding)
a few T chana dal
a few T rice
(recipe said you can use potato, too!)
spices (i did cloves, allspice, cumin seed, mustard seed, and coriander)
ginger
salt

soak the grains and rice for a few hours, blend with not a lot of water, leave to ferment, and just before frying up, add spices and whatever else you want.

we did a few batches savory and we liked ‘em, but when i started rolling them in sugar, we discovered they are approximately the best thing ever.

i found a good trick was to make tiny doughnut holes so they’d cook all the way through at a temperature high enough to keep the batter from absorbing all the oil.

EDIT:
just made them for a vegan friend’s birthday, and they were unimpressed. hmm. they all got rolled in sugar and eaten up, anyway. also finally figured out how to make them doughnut-shaped: when grinding the batter, add water a tablespoon-full at a time and only add enough to allow the food processor to do its thing. then just form into a circle and toss it in the oil like that.

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