Posts Tagged ‘chinese’

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Hong You Chao Shou (sichuan pork wontons)

February 27, 2014

After I made la jiao jiang hot pepper oil, I started putting the caramelized onions on everything from bleu cheese potatoes to pizza. I wondered, though – what do people in the Sichuan province put their chili oil on?

Found this recipe on red shallot kitchen. It was my first time working with wonton wrappers. They are quite easy to use. I bet these would be fantastic vegan or vegetarian – stewed cabbage, spiced tofu, or anything could go inside these slippery dumplings.

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1 1/2 pounds ground pork (with about 20% fat. Do not use lean pork)
1 egg
1 inch fresh ginger, finely minced
8 garlic cloves, finely minced
2 tablespoons chinese rice wine, or dry sherry
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon chicken bouillon (optional)
Salt and white pepper
40 wonton wrappers (3 1/2-inch or 4-inch square)
4 tablespoons soy sauce
1/4 cup Sichuan chili oil (Hong You)
4 tablespoons chinese black rice vinegar (also called Chinkiang/Zenjiang vinegar)
2 scallions, chopped

In a large bowl, mix pork, egg, ginger, half of minced garlic, rice wine, sesame oil, chicken bouillon, salt and pepper until well blended. Lay out one wonton wrapper on a plate, place one heaping teaspoon of pork filling in the center of the wrapper. Brush the edges with water, fold the wrapper diagonally so it forms a triangle. Take 2 opposite corner and overlap each other, using a little bit of water to help them adhere. Place wonton on a lightly floured cookie sheet, repeat the process with the remaining wrappers and pork filling.
In a mixing bowl, combine chili oil, soy sauce, black vinegar, and the remaining of minced garlic. Set aside.
Bring salted water to boil in a large pot. Working in batch, boil wontons for about 5 minutes, or until the wontons are cooked through and start floating to the surface. Transfer wontons to a large strainer to drain. Add wontons to chili sauce and mix thoroughly. Sprinkle with chopped onion and serve immediately.

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from the red shallot kitchen.

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Recommended! I think they’re worth the effort – they’re so beautiful and tasty!

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la jiao jiang (hot pepper oil)

February 5, 2014

chinese hot chili pepper paste in oil.

the paste is great, and the superpowered hot oil is perfect for opening up your sinuses on a winter night. drizzle the oil over salads, use it in stirfry or chili, fry eggs in it, top hummus with it…

gorgeous visual directions here, but if you prefer text, here it is.

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heat lots of oil. fry one minced onion until color begins to change.

grind up many spicy dried hot chili peppers with your food processor, blender, spice grinder, or mortar and pestle to make pepper flakes.

add dried pepper flakes to frying pan and open a window.
(seriously. pepper spray. open your windows.)

add a lot of sesame seeds.

cook quite a long time on low heat until caramelized and browned.

when browned. add contents to mason jar and top with a layer of oil.

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from here – thanks, mark!

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i made it today and i recommend you do the same.

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lazy leftover fried rice with broccoli

September 8, 2013

Tempted to call for take-out because you don’t have any food in the house? Here’s some Americanized Chinese food for a lazy day!

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Steam broccoli.

In a (separate) frying pan, heat canola oil. fry raw unseasoned meat or meat substitute or mushrooms in it (optional, of course) and set aside.

In same frying pan (no need to rinse it,) fry onions on medium-high, stirring frequently. When translucent, add fresh minced ginger or garlic. When aromatic, add leftover rice. Cook a few minutes.

Re-add the meat or mushrooms, and, if you like, a handful of frozen peas. Remember to stir frequently.

In a bowl, whisk together a fair amount of either tamari, soy sauce, or hoisin if you like it super-sweet. Add peanut or sesame oil, sesame seeds, a little rice wine vinegar, little Sriracha (to taste,) cooking sherry, two drops of fish sauce, and a little miso.

When the broccoli is done steaming, cut it into pieces and throw it into the pan. Crack a few eggs over it and stir immediately. Cook a few minutes.

Pour the liquid evenly over the food while stirring. Cook a few minutes. Eat.

This tastes exactly like Americanized Chinese take-out fried rice. It’s easy to customize – eggplant fried rice, steak fried rice, fish fried rice, whatever you have in the house! A great dinner for those times there’s nothing in the house and you’re tempted to spend money on takeout. This costs almost nothing to make and has big flavor. You can’t go wrong with it – snap peas, carrots, leftover baked potatoes – you can stick any food into fried rice.

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FRIED RICE QUESTIONS

“How come my fried rice doesn’t taste like take-out?”
You won’t like my answer. Restaurants use WAY more oil and sugar than most home cooks would ever dream of.

“Why is it mushy or sticking together?”
Don’t use fresh rice! If you cooked the rice the same day you tried to fry it, that’s your problem. It needs to lose moisture. Make rice, stick it in your fridge, and fry it tomorrow or the next day.
If your rice is leftover, you’re not using enough heat! Kick it up to medium-high, or higher if you have someone to stir it constantly for you while you dump in ingredients. Don’t add anything to the pan until it’s super hot!

“What if I’m totally broke?”
Just go for soy sauce with ginger. Rice wine vinegar is cheap and a great investment, but if limes are cheaper in your area, go for those instead.

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sweet and sour pork

February 24, 2013

cut pork chops into little bite-sized pieces.

in a food processor, process about a half of a big onion, four cloves of raw garlic, 2T soy sauce, a half of a small can of pineapple rings, a pinch of five-spice powder, a pinch of salt, a generous amount of black pepper, a dash of rice wine vinegar, and a small amount of minced ginger. optional add-ins include part of a pear, a squeeze of citrus juice, roasted garlic, or your favorite hot sauce. (we added sriracha.)
pulse until pureed.

marinate pork in sweet and sour puree as long as you can remain patient. (about 45 mins. for us.)

meanwhile, start a pot of rice and red lentils. i flavored it with butter, salt, coriander, ginger, and sriracha.

mince an orange, red, or yellow sweet pepper. if you like it hot, you can also mince a chili pepper.

heat lard in a pan. throw in the pork and marinade. cook 5 mins, stirring regularly. add peppers. cook until pork is hot all the way through.

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crunchy szechuan green beans

January 26, 2013

1 clove garlic, minced
1-inch knob of fresh ginger, minced (should equal about 2 teaspoons)
2 Tablespoon hoisin sauce
1 Tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon rice vinegar
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes (this will be spicy – reduce, if you prefer less spice)
1 Tablespoon oil
1 pound green beans, cut into 1-inch pieces and rubbed dry with a towel

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Whisk together the first seven ingredients (through crushed red pepper) in a small bowl. Set aside.
Heat the sunflower oil in a wok or heavy-bottomed saute pan over medium-high heat. Just when the sunflower oil begins to shimmer, add the green beans and sauté, stirring constantly, until they begin to blacken in small spots, about 3 minutes. (Note: Be careful when adding the green beans to the pan, as they should sizzle and pop a bit if the oil is hot enough. This process should go very quickly, with the green beans retaining a bright green color, even though they will start to blacken a bit in spots.)
Add the sauce to the pan, stirring to coat the green beans. Cook just until the sauce reduces slightly, about 2 minutes.

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recipe by inquiring chef

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simple eggplant yangshuo style (chinese eggplant)

October 5, 2012

1 pound eggplant, sliced into 1-inch pieces
4 cloves garlic, crushed and minced
4 tablespoons ginger, crushed and minced
4 green onions, sliced
4 tablespoons peanut oil
2 teaspoons black bean sauce
1 or 2 teaspoons chili paste
2 teaspoons oyster sauce (veg? sub hoisin sauce.)
1/2 cup water

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Heat wok or a wide skillet over high heat. When the pan is very hot, add the oil and turn the heat to medium. Add the eggplant to the pan, frying over medium until browned and soft. If the oil smokes, turn down the heat to low.

Reduce the heat, and move the eggplant out of the center of the pan or wok. Add the garlic, ginger, chili paste and black bean sauce to the center of the pan, and continue cooking for two to three minutes more, until the ingredients are very fragrant.

Return the eggplant to the middle of the pan, add the water and oyster sauce, and turn the heat to high. Cook the mixture until the water is mostly evaporated. Add green onions, mix together and serve.

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Adapted by the bitten word from The Yangshuo Cooking School

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not bad; nothing to write home about. i left out the black bean paste, and i think that’s probably where a lot of the flavor comes from. oh well.

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pak thong kuih – lacto-fermented rice honeycomb dessert

May 5, 2012

you’ll have to see the pictures in the original recipe over at table for 2….. or more to see why this seems so magickal. how do single celled organisms turn rice into a honeycombed dessert? this is amazing!

i just started on this one today!!

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combine
100gm cooled, cooked rice
½ Tbsp Chinese Wine Yeast ( 甜酒饼,Ragi, sweet type) [i just used a pinch of bread yeast..]
1 tsp sugar
½ Tbsp water
Mix everything together, keep in a covered container (not air-tight!)
Leave it in a cabinet or cold room to ferment for 48 hours.

(note: started 9pm may 5. ready on monday night, may 7!)

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after 48 hours, weight out 60gms (~1/4 c) &
(use the extra to make some fermented rice pancakes!)

to that 60gm fermented rice, add
100gm (~1/2 c) rice flour
water (just to moisten)

ferment for 16-18 hours
Weigh out 80gm of this & set aside.

(started 10pm may 7, done 2pm-4pm tomorrow)

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in a separate bowl, combine 220 gm. pure rice flour, 30 gm. tapioca or other starch, and 280 gm. water

in a separate pot, boil 200 gm. castor sugar, 400 ml. water, and 3 blades of pandan leaves tied into a knot (or other flavor). pour half into the fresh water-flour-starch mixture. cool the other half before pouring it in. add the ferment and ferment again for 12ish hours.

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add a quarter teaspoon of baking soda to a teaspoon of water. take a quarter teaspoon of that mixture and add it to the ferment, along with a teaspoon of oil.

pour into a greased steaming tray and steam 15-20 mins over medium heat, or until a skewer comes out clean.

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5/13
well, i accidentally became overwhelmed by responsibilities and found myself extending the last ferment by a few days. at first, i kept up with it, pouring off the rice wine on top and adding fresh flour. then i slacked. when i finally checked it three days later, it looked hopeless. it smelled like vinegar, and a few fruit flies had somehow made it under the lid kept loose for aeration. i added rice flour and sugar and a few hunks of fresh strawberries hoping to kick-start it. after only ten minutes, the smell was already sweeter and healthier as the yeast woke up. i poured off the rice wine vinegar and fruit flies, added a little cinnamon, and invented some bizarre contraption with a loaf pan in a steamer basket in a pot with a lid on top. i completely forgot the baking soda and oil, so who knows what bizarre consistency or taste will come of this. i’ve been steaming it for a really long time (20 mins at least) and it’s still sort of gooey but tightening up around the edges.

HEY! IT’S DONE!

AND IT’S HONEYCOMBED!

it has a giant hole in the middle with a wrinkled honeycomb pattern coming from it. the pattern almost looks like a grapefruit.

taste:
distinct sourdough flavor. wild! not at ALL sweet. covering the finished product in date syrup is pretty and turns it into a dessert! the sourdough is much more complex and well-developed than i’d thought it would be after just a few days. really wonderful!

texture:
sticky, chewy, jiggly, jello-y, filled with air pockets, awesome, weird, fun!

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MAKE THIS!

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