Posts Tagged ‘american’

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peachy yum-yum (easy peach cobbler)

August 6, 2014

6 peaches
2 T lemon juice
2 T corn starch
1/2 c sugar

boil 1 minute & pour into 2-qt. casserole dish

preheat oven to 400

separately, cut 3 T butter into 1 T sugar, 1 1/2 t baking powder, 1/2 t salt (opt) and 1 cup flour.
stir in 1/2 c cold milk and 1/4-1/2 t pumpkin pie spice or cinnamon.
drop by spoonfuls into peach mixture.
sprinkle brown sugar over the top and bake at 400 for 25-30 min.

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i forgot to write down the name of this (“peach cobbler”). i rushed over to a friend’s with it. when they asked me what it was called, i said “peachy yum-yum” without thinking about it.

the cobbler is like biscuit dough. the peach syrup that forms from cooking the peaches for just one minute is thick, red, rich, and habit-forming.

this is a great and easy method for softening underripe peaches. highly recommended, even if you skip the biscuit dough on top and just snack on some peaches and sugar.

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from pick your own: peach recipes

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compromise cornbread

June 12, 2014

it is not easy to find a cornbread everyone can agree on.

should it be sweet or savory? dense or light? mostly cornmeal or mostly white flour?

i finally found a cornbread recipe that can please those who like northern cornbread (sweet and light) and those who like it southern-style (savory and dense).

1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour (i used about 1 1/4 c apf, a quarter-cup combined coconut and oat flours, and a quarter-cup combined sorghum and rice flours. you can also use your favorite gf flour mixture.)
1 cup cornmeal
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 teaspoon salt or seasoned salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted and cooled, or for a moister but less healthy cornbread, 1/4c veg oil and 1/4c cooled and melted butter
1 large egg
3/4 can of corn kernels (opt) [i used a whole can and it was just a tiny bit too much]
1/2 serrano or jalapeno, minced (opt)
huge pinch cheese (opt)
huge pinch of smoked paprika (opt)
huge pinch roasted garlic powder (opt)
huge pinch fresh cilantro (opt)
small pinch dried oregano (opt)

grease your pan or muffin tin

preheat to 375

whisk together dry ingredients.

separately (i used a large mason jar and shook it up together) combine the wet ingredients

mix together until just combined

bake 25+ mins or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean
(muffins took about 35 minutes and bread in large casserole dish took over 45 minutes)

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modified from the king arthur flour recipe

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vegan cajun “blackened andouille sausage”

May 4, 2014

another happy accident from my kitchen to yours.

cut extra firm tofu into “steaks” and marinate in your favorite dressing or marinade as long as you can stand. (i did oil, lemon juice, soy sauce, garlic, tahini, and some other stuff. you can use salad dressing if you’re lazy.) sprinkle with a lot of cajun seasonings. if you don’t have it, throw together lots of paprika with a little salt, thyme, red pepper, black pepper, and lots of garlic powder. make it as spicy as you can stand with red pepper or cayenne.

marinate a few hours, or as long as you can stand to wait.

start hot chili oil (or any high heat oil like canola) on medium-high, like for flash-frying.

fry on one side until dark brown.

start to break it up with your spatula. get rough with it, until it crumbles into ground sausage sized pieces.

continue stir-frying until crumbles firm up and get meaty.

serve on top of a salad – i can attest that this is terrific for dinner!
you can also serve it anywhere you need a little spice! How about on a vegan po’ boy sandwich, in a stir-fry, mixed into a bean salad, tucked into a lasagna, or – of course – jambalaya, gumbo, or any of their infinite variations? the possibilities are endless!

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new england clam chowder

April 26, 2014

my very first clam chowder.

watch out – this is not a cheap dish unless you went clamming this morning. (if you did, please invite me over so i can help you make this.)

in a soup pot, saute an onion in lard until translucent
add 2T flour, saute a few minutes
add clam juice from 3 small cans clams (not the meat) + 1 bottle clam juice
simmer 10 mins
add 1 bay leaf, around 1t dried thyme, a few cups of veg (or fish) stock, a few cloves roasted garlic, and a few red potatoes, cut small
simmer until potatoes are cooked through
separately, in a saucepan, add a pint of half and half to the clam meat and simmer until clams are cooked, 5-10 minutes
combine everything with a dash of sherry, worcestershire, salt and pepper, and tabasco, and serve.

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modified from this

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i am a sucker for cream, so i can’t imagine a better way to put clams in my face. clams are not my favorite, but cream is, and this soup is ideal for a rainy spring day craving for potatoes and cream. dip sourdough in the broth – it’s great.

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chipotle-chocolate chili

January 25, 2014

Do you like smokey, dark, thick, savory, rich chili?

You just found your new favorite recipe.

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Cook four slices of bacon in large stockpot. (optional – just add coconut oil or butter if you don’t eat bacon.)

While it cooks, slice a huge sweet onion or two-three small onions.

Put a head of garlic and a sweet bell pepper in your toaster oven and roast it until they’re caramelized.

Remove bacon when done. Add onion to hot grease.

Cook onions over a low heat until caramelized.

When done, add stock (any kind) or water, chipotle salsa, a large can of fire-roasted tomatoes, a bay leaf or two, and your choice of cooked beans. (I like some combination of red kidney beans, butter beans, and pinto beans, but you can’t go wrong with any beans in chili. Black lentils or even cannelini beans are great.)

Add bouillon or any kind of fat. Coconut oil is great. So is schmaltz from leftover chicken (I save mine for this purpose!) or even grease from last night’s hamburgers.

Season with tons of paprika, oregano, cumin, coriander, garlic powder, onion powder, a little pumpkin pie spice, and a lot of unsweetened cocoa powder.

Seed & peel the black skin off the pepper. Add the pepper and roasted garlic.

Simmer >1hr, or until it tastes amazing.

Salt and pepper to taste.

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cranberry sauce with red wine and figs

November 28, 2013

water as needed
1 splash – 1 cup of red wine
half a packet of dried figs (about 10-12)
a half-cup to a cup of fresh, frozen, or dried cranberries, cherries, and whatever else you have
just a bit of fresh orange zest, orange juice, or candied orange
one quick squeeze of a fresh lemon
a pinch powdered allspice or cinnamon
a t apple cider or red wine vinegar
if you need a sweetener, use whatever you like – honey, sugar, etc.

bring to a boil and simmer until sweet and tender. continue adding water, as the figs will soak up a lot of liquid.

if you prefer it thicker, add a pinch of potato starch or corn starch.

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modified from david lebowitz‘s version

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bubbling butter beans

November 11, 2013

Are you wondering, like I was, “What are butter beans?”

I also just learned that the south calls them “butter beans.”
I have seen canned butter beans in the stores down here and wondered what they were! I love lima beans, but I think I like them even better when they’re called butter beans.

Lima beans, butter beans – whatever you call them, they are creamy and rich-tasting. Somehow, even though they are the bacon of the bean world, they are incredibly high in fiber, B vitamins, magnesium, potassium, and iron. They even lower blood sugar.

3 tablespoons olive oil or fat
6 slices thick-sliced bacon (or sausage)
½ cup finely chopped shallots or sliced onions
4 garlic cloves, crushed and peeled, plus 1 tablespoon grated garlic (use a Microplane) or garlic mashed to paste
1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage
2 cups chicken stock or canned low-sodium broth
4 cups cooked butter beans or two 15-ounce jars or cans butter beans, drained, rinsed if canned (also known by their other name – lima beans!)
1 cup Pomi diced tomatoes (or other Tetra Pak tomatoes), drained
1 teaspoon dried oregano
salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
White wine vinegar

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F.

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat until it sizzles when a piece of bacon is added. Add the rest of the bacon, the shallots, crushed garlic, and sage and cook, stirring, until the shallots are just translucent, 3 to 4 minutes.

Add the chicken stock and bring to a boil. Add the beans, bring to a simmer, and simmer for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil in a small skillet over high heat until very hot. Add the tomatoes and sauté for 2 minutes, then add the grated garlic and oregano and cook until most of the moisture has evaporated and the tomatoes are crackling.

Stir the tomatoes into the bean mixture, along with the prosciutto fat. Season with salt and pepper and pour into a 2-quart casserole or baking dish.

Transfer to the oven and bake for 20 minutes, until the beans are velvety and creamy. If the beans start to look dry, add a splash of water.

Stir the parsley into the beans, adjust the acidity with white wine vinegar as necessary, and drizzle generously with olive oil. Serve, or keep warm in a low oven until ready to serve.

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adapted from seven spoons. the photos of these beans with a sunny-side up egg over the top looks amazing.

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update:
AMAZING!

i tweaked it considerably.

MY VERSION:

VEG: roast garlic and other roastable veggies. whatever’s in season: squash, brussels sprouts, anything! chop them, and start them in a pan or pot with some olive oil.
NON-VEG: in a large pot or pan, add bacon, ham, salt pork, bits of fat you trimmed off last night’s pork chops or chicken, or ground sausage. any flavorful, fatty meat.
BOTH: add two small sliced onions. (add extra fat if they stick.)
add half a head of roasted garlic and any roasted veggies you have.
rinse two cans of butter beans and add.
fry for a few minutes.
add seasoned (herbed) tomato sauce and your favorite stock or even just a little water and cooking wine. pepper, salt to taste, fresh herbs if you want. it’s all good.

the sauce ends up buttery and creamy from the beans.

this is simple, quick to prepare, cheap, very filling, and HIGHLY recommended. great as a dip, or a sandwich spread, or piled on crackers or toast, side dish, or just eaten alone! butter beans don’t have a “beany” taste or texture – they are great for picky eaters. i tend to prefer heavily seasoned beans, but this is perfect just like it is.

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jalapeno-cheddar beer bread

October 6, 2013

BEER-BATTER CHEESE BREAD
MAKES ONE 9-INCH LOAF

Insert the toothpick in a few spots when testing for doneness; it may hit a pocket of cheese, which resembles uncooked batter on the toothpick. Strongly flavored beers make the bread bitter, so mild beers work best here.

8 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, 4 ounces shredded and 4 ounces cut into ¼ -inch cubes
one or two minced fresh jalapenos, seeded
3 cups (15 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons sugar
4 teaspoons baking powder
1½ teaspoons salt
½ teaspoon pepper
1 (12-ounce) bottle light-bodied beer (see note)
4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter, melted

1. Adjust an oven rack to the middle position and heat the oven to 375 degrees. Grease a 9 by 5 inch loaf pan.
2. Combine the shredded and cubed cheese, flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and pepper in a large bowl. Stir in the beer and mix until well combined. Pour the batter into the prepared loaf pan, spreading it to the corners. Drizzle the melted butter evenly over the top of the batter.
3. Bake until the loaf is deep golden brown and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, 45 to 50 minutes. Cool the bread in the pan for 5 minutes, then turn it out onto a rack. Cool completely and slice as desired. (Although this bread can be kept in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days, after the second day the bread is best toasted.)

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from chris and libbie, who in turn got it from cooks illustrated, who i refuse to link now that they are charging for their recipes. food is a right and recipes should be free!

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lazy leftover fried rice with broccoli

September 8, 2013

Tempted to call for take-out because you don’t have any food in the house? Here’s some Americanized Chinese food for a lazy day!

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Steam broccoli.

In a (separate) frying pan, heat canola oil. fry raw unseasoned meat or meat substitute or mushrooms in it (optional, of course) and set aside.

In same frying pan (no need to rinse it,) fry onions on medium-high, stirring frequently. When translucent, add fresh minced ginger or garlic. When aromatic, add leftover rice. Cook a few minutes.

Re-add the meat or mushrooms, and, if you like, a handful of frozen peas. Remember to stir frequently.

In a bowl, whisk together a fair amount of either tamari, soy sauce, or hoisin if you like it super-sweet. Add peanut or sesame oil, sesame seeds, a little rice wine vinegar, little Sriracha (to taste,) cooking sherry, two drops of fish sauce, and a little miso.

When the broccoli is done steaming, cut it into pieces and throw it into the pan. Crack a few eggs over it and stir immediately. Cook a few minutes.

Pour the liquid evenly over the food while stirring. Cook a few minutes. Eat.

This tastes exactly like Americanized Chinese take-out fried rice. It’s easy to customize – eggplant fried rice, steak fried rice, fish fried rice, whatever you have in the house! A great dinner for those times there’s nothing in the house and you’re tempted to spend money on takeout. This costs almost nothing to make and has big flavor. You can’t go wrong with it – snap peas, carrots, leftover baked potatoes – you can stick any food into fried rice.

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FRIED RICE QUESTIONS

“How come my fried rice doesn’t taste like take-out?”
You won’t like my answer. Restaurants use WAY more oil and sugar than most home cooks would ever dream of.

“Why is it mushy or sticking together?”
Don’t use fresh rice! If you cooked the rice the same day you tried to fry it, that’s your problem. It needs to lose moisture. Make rice, stick it in your fridge, and fry it tomorrow or the next day.
If your rice is leftover, you’re not using enough heat! Kick it up to medium-high, or higher if you have someone to stir it constantly for you while you dump in ingredients. Don’t add anything to the pan until it’s super hot!

“What if I’m totally broke?”
Just go for soy sauce with ginger. Rice wine vinegar is cheap and a great investment, but if limes are cheaper in your area, go for those instead.

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louisiana red beans and rice (+ vegan version)

August 14, 2013

scroll down for a vegan version!

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meaty cajun red beans and rice

1 pound dry kidney beans
1/4 cup olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
1 green bell pepper, chopped
2 tablespoons minced garlic
2 stalks celery, chopped
6 cups water
2 bay leaves
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon dried sage
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1 teaspoon Cajun seasoning
1 pound andouille sausage, sliced, or 1 smoked ham hock
4 cups water
2 cups long grain white rice

Rinse beans, and then soak in a large pot of water overnight.
In a skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Cook onion, bell pepper, garlic, and celery in olive oil for 3 to 4 minutes.
Rinse beans, and transfer to a large pot with 6 cups water. Stir cooked vegetables into beans. Season with bay leaves, cayenne pepper, thyme, sage, parsley, and Cajun seasoning. Add hamhock, if using. Bring to a boil, and then reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer for 2 1/2 hours.
Stir sausage into beans, and continue to simmer for 30 minutes.
Meanwhile, prepare the rice. In a saucepan, bring water and rice to a boil. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 20 minutes. Serve beans over steamed white rice.

modified from here

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vegan louisiana red beans and rice

1 medium onion
1/2 green pepper
2 ribs celery
3 cloves garlic
3 15-ounce cans light red beans (no sugar added), drained and well-rinsed
1 15-ounce can can fire-roasted tomatoes
1 teaspoon thyme
1 teaspoon oregano
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
1 teaspoon salt (optional or to taste)
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 – 1 teaspoon red (cayenne) pepper (to taste)
2 teaspoons hot sauce, plus more to serve
Smoked salt or Liquid Smoke seasoning (optional)
cooked brown rice, to serve

Begin heating a large, non-stick pot over medium-high heat.
Cut the onion into quarters and pulse it in the food processor to mince; add it to the heated pan. Cut the pepper into quarters and chop it finely in the processor; add it to the pan. Cut the celery into 2-inch long pieces and chop it and the garlic in the processor; add it to the pan.
Stir the vegetables well and add 2 tablespoons of water. Cook until soft, about 6-10 minutes.
While the vegetables are cooking, rinse the beans well. Put half of them (1 1/2 cans) into the food processor with half of the can of tomatoes. Process until all the beans are coarsely chopped, just short of pureed.
When the vegetables are soft, stir in the blended beans, remaining whole beans, remaining tomatoes, and all seasonings except smoked salt. Cover tightly, reduce heat to very low, and cook for at least 30 minutes. Stir every 5 or 10 minutes and add water as needed to keep beans moist but not soupy. Like regular red beans, these taste better the longer they cook, so consider 30 minutes the bare minimum and cook them longer if you can, adding water as necessary.
Just before serving, sprinkle with smoked salt or a little Liquid Smoke. Stir well, and serve atop rice with more hot sauce on the table.

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from the fat-free vegan kitchen

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