Archive for the ‘veggies’ Category

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corn relish (fermented!)

August 19, 2014

I CAN’T WAIT to try this recipe from Sandy Katz!

4 ears fresh sweet corn, kernels cut off of the cobs (or about 2 cups canned or frozen)
4 hot and/or sweet red peppers, chopped (about 1 cup)
1 onion, chopped (about 1 cup)
1 pear, cored and chopped, or other seasonal fruit
2 teaspoons salt

1. Mix all ingredients together in a bowl. Use your hands to squeeze them with some force for a few minutes. This will bruise vegetables and release juices. Do this until the mix is moist enough that when you squeeze a handful liquid drips down, as with a saturated sponge. Taste and add salt as necessary.

2. Stuff vegetables into a wide-mouth quart jar or other vessel. Seal the jar loosely so carbon dioxide pressure that will build during fermentation can escape. Ferment about two days in a warm environment, three or four days in a cooler spot. Once fermented flavors have developed, move to refrigerator until ready to serve; if you let it continue fermenting, sweet flavors will disappear altogether and the relish will become extremely sour. If surface growth develops (unlikely in a mostly full jar), skim off, discard, and enjoy the relish beneath it, protected from the mold.

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recipe by Sandy Katz, published in the New York Times

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cold ukranian borscht (beet soup)

August 13, 2014

This is a great summer soup!

When many people think of borscht, borsch, borshch, barzcz, or borchch, they think of a heavy winter stew made with lots of beef bones and potatoes. If you’ve never tried a summery cold borscht, I highly recommend it. Ukranian-style borscht is cool, creamy, and refreshing. Unlike heavy hot deep red borscht with chunks of beef, this pink Ukranian version doesn’t suffer at all when made vegetarian, with veggie stock.

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make your own chicken or veg stock
roast a head of garlic
shred part of a cabbage, one bunch of peeled raw beets, two small raw potatoes, and a large carrot. put some lemon juice on the shredded raw beets.

heat stock and add shredded veggies and roasted garlic, a pinch of paprika, a bay leaf, and a half-teaspoon or so of allspice. add veggie scraps like parsley stalks and carrot tops and remove before serving or storing.

while this boils, make the zapravka in a separate pan. heat some lard or oil and saute one onion. when translucent, add one chopped carrot. when they begin to soften, add salt, pepper, 2 T tomato paste,

cook everything together until it tastes amazing.

when done, add tons of plain yogurt or sour cream, tons of fresh raw dill, minced pickles or pickled peppers, sliced hard-boiled eggs, and juice from half a fresh lemon.

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adapted by friedsig from ukranianguide

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dahiwale achari baingan (eggplant in spicy yogurt sauce)

August 8, 2014

Yet another recipe that looks amazing from ãhãram! Aubergines, baingan, eggplant – it’s one of my favorites.

Baingan or Aubergines – 250 gms
Onions – 2 Large
Dahi, Curd or Yogurt – 1 Cup
Ginger-Garlic Paste – 1 tbsp
Chilli Powder – 1 tsp
Turmeric – 1/2 tsp
Saunf or Fennel Seeds – 1 tsp
Jeera or Cumin Seeds – 1/2 tsp
Kalonji or Nigella Seeds – 1 tsp
Rai or Mustard Seeds – 1/2 tsp
Methi or Fenugreek Seeds – 1/2 tsp
Green Chillies – 2
Garam Masala – 1/2 tsp
Amchur or Dried Mango Powder – 1/2 tsp
Hing or Asafoetida – A Large Pinch
Oil – 2 tbsp + 1 tsp
Salt to Taste
Method

In a large vessel, create a marinade by mixing ginger-garlic paste, chilli powder, turmeric powder, 1/2 tsp salt and 1 tsp oil.
Cut the eggplant into 1/2″ pieces.
Mix the eggplant pieces well with the marinade.
Set aside for 10 minutes.
Peel and slice the onions into thin long pieces.
In a wok or kadhai, heat 1 tbsp oil.
Add the marinated aubergine pieces and stir-fry till the aubergine just starts to turn soft.
Take out the aubergines and set aside.
To the same wok, add the remaining oil.
Add mustard, fennel, nigella, cumin, and fenugreek seeds.
Stir-fry for a minute or till the seeds start to pop.
Add the sliced onions and slit green chillies.
Stir-fry till the onions are transparent & turn off heat.
Add asafoetida, garam masala and amchur powder.
Mix well.
Beat and add the yogurt to the fried onions.
Mix & add remaining ingredients.

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from ãhãram!

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moroccan chickpea salad

July 31, 2014

2 x 400g (14 oz) cans of chickpeas (garbanzos) drained, rinsed & strained
1 red onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ cup dried cranberries, apricots, or currants
1 wholepiece of a preserved lemon, rind only, finely chopped
Juice of 1 fresh lemon
½ cup olive oil
2 tbs soy sauce
1 tbs ground cumin
1 tbs paprika
1 tbs ground cinnamon
a handful of baby spinach leaves (optional)
¼ cup finely chopped parsley (or any fresh herb you like)
½ cup Greek yoghurt
⅓ cup pistachios, roughly chopped
Pomegranate molasses

Place the chickpeas in a bowl add the onions, garlic, currants, preserved lemon, spices, olive oil, lemon juice and soy sauce in a large bowl. Toss to combine and leave to marinate for at least an hour.
Line a serving bowl with the baby spinach leaves Throw a handful of spinach in a bowl, and top with the chickpeas and parsley. Top with the yoghurt and pistachios, and drizzle with the pomegranate molasses.

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recipe adapted by friedsig and originally penned by le delicieux

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Sounds like a very pretty presentation – something I put zero effort into for my own quick lunches. I simplified this recipe to make this very elegant (but elaborate) salad completely accessible to anyone seeking a very healthy, flavorful, fast, affordable, and easy lunch to take along, or ultra-fast weeknight dinner.

I used fresh dill and basil instead of parsley, because it’s what I had in the house. I love currants, so I used those. I also added a part of a roasted jalapeno from the farmers market because I have so many, and a big pinch of smoked paprika. Recommended! Of course, hot pepper pickles are incredible in any salad.

This is one of my two favorite cold chickpea salad recipes this summer. The other is this 5 minute warm chickpea and feta salad.

Try this one!

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beet salad with dilled yogurt

July 23, 2014

400g beets / beetroot, fresh, cooked to your liking and cut into matchsticks (roasting and boiling are both great) or grated raw and uncooked
2-3 Tablespoon fresh chopped dill, to taste
3 Tablespoons Greek yoghurt
1 tspn za’atar (opt.)
salt and pepper, to taste

one OR the other of:
1 garlic clove, crushed
1 tbspn pomegranate molasses

Mix together the yoghurt, molasses, garlic, za’atar and seasoning – check that the taste is okay for you and add more molasses or seasoning as needed. Stir in the beetroot and half the dill. Fold together gently or mix well – depending on how pink you want your yoghurt to turn, or whether you want a more marbled pink/white look! Scatter over the extra dill and serve.

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adapted from lime and barley

 

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I highly recommend this salad, though I changed the recipe to recommend garlic OR pomegranate molasses and not both. It’s amazing how a good fresh beet has so much flavor on its own and barely needs any seasoning to taste so complex and interesting! This is my new favorite three-ingredient meal.

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watercress and buttermilk soup

July 22, 2014

cook the white and light green parts of 2 sliced leeks in 2 T unsalted butter in a medium pot over medium heat, stirring until tender, 4-6 mins.

add one chopped russet potato, 2 cups chicken broth, and 4 cups water.

simmer until potato is tender, 8 – 10 mins. add 2 bunches watercress (thick stems removed) and 1 T fresh tarragon leaves.

cook until watercress is bright green, about 1 minute.

puree, stir in 1/2 c buttermilk, season with salt. serve warm or room temperature topped with tarragon.

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from a clipping in a magazine (not sure which magazine!)

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it’s more of a watercress vichyssoise, or cold potato and leek soup, than a buttermilk soup. it doesn’t taste like buttermilk – it has a lot of flavor for being so simple. my mom hates tarragon, so i substituted dill. i figured, you can’t go wrong with potatoes and dill. i also added garlic. it came out well. if you are craving a cold potato soup, this is a good one. not my favorite soup, but definitely a good, solid way to use an abundance of cress. i liked sipping it cold out of a mug on a hot morning.

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smoked salmon spring rolls

July 11, 2014

super quick, super healthy! i was told to “cook” something that didn’t involve the oven. great for hot days. a nice variation of sweet veg spring rolls for fish eaters.

- spring roll wrappers
– smoked salmon or other smoked fish
– fresh crunchy veg, like thinly sliced cucumbers, thinly sliced carrot, lightly steamed asparagus, or fresh lettuce
– creamy things, like avocado, goat cheese, or cream cheese
– mung bean noodles or thin rice noodles
– fresh herbs, like fresh dill, tarragon, basil, mint, cilantro, or any combination

roll all thinly sliced ingredients into soaked and prepared spring roll wrappers.

serve with a dipping sauce like gyoza dipping sauce, or make a simple dipping sauce with any combination of mirin, soy sauce or hoisin, ginger, sesame oil, chili sauce, rice wine vinegar, and fish sauce.

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