Archive for the ‘sauces’ Category

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cranberry sauce with red wine and figs

November 28, 2013

water as needed
1 splash – 1 cup of red wine
half a packet of dried figs (about 10-12)
a half-cup to a cup of fresh, frozen, or dried cranberries, cherries, and whatever else you have
just a bit of fresh orange zest, orange juice, or candied orange
one quick squeeze of a fresh lemon
a pinch powdered allspice or cinnamon
a t apple cider or red wine vinegar
if you need a sweetener, use whatever you like – honey, sugar, etc.

bring to a boil and simmer until sweet and tender. continue adding water, as the figs will soak up a lot of liquid.

if you prefer it thicker, add a pinch of potato starch or corn starch.

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modified from david lebowitz‘s version

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onion tomato chutney

August 11, 2013

an onion
a few small tomatoes or a big tomato
3 cloves garlic, whole
2 T roasted gram or urad dal or other split pulse
2 t oil
3-5 dried red chili peppers
1/4 t tamarind paste
3 curry leaves
1/4 t mustard seed
salt, to taste

peel garlic cloves and add whole chilis and whole garlic cloves to medium-hot pan with oil. roast. add chopped onions. salt and saute until golden. add tomato and cook until mushy. add roasted gram/lentils. switch off flame. add tamarind. cool and grind with a little water. temper curry leaves and mustard seeds in an oiled pan and add to the food processor or mortar and pestle.

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adapted from jeyashri’s kitchen

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harissa

August 6, 2013

“Harissa is a North African hot red sauce or paste made from chili peppers (often smoked or dried) and garlic, often with coriander and caraway or cumin and served with olive oil…

Harissa is used both as a condiment and as an ingredient in recipes. It has been described as an important item in Tunisian cuisine. Harissa is also used in a few recipes of other North African cuisines, namely Morocco, Algeria and Libya…

In Tunisia, harissa is served at virtually every meal as part of an appetizer along with olives and tuna. It is also used as an ingredient in a meat (goat or lamb) or fish stew with vegetables. Harissa is also used to flavour the sauce for couscous… In Saharan regions, harissa can have a smoky flavor.” – lebanese recipes

Ingredients:

3 ounces mild and hot chilies (combine ancho, New Mexican, and guajillo chiles)
1 clove garlic crushed with 1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon coriander — ground
1 teaspoon caraway seed — ground
1 red bell pepper — roasted
1 teaspoon fine sea salt
olive oil

Preparation:

Stem, seed, and break up chilies. Place in a bowl and pour over boiling water. Cover and let stand 30 minutes. Drain; wrap in cheese cloth and press out excess moisture. Do the same for the red bell pepper.
Grind chilies in food processor with garlic, spices, red bell pepper, and salt. Add enough oil to make a thick paste.
Pack the mixture in a small dry jar; cover the harissa with a thin layer of oil, cover with a lid and keep refrigerated. Will keep 2 to 3 weeks in the refrigerator with a thin layer of oil.

Harissa Sauce:

Serve at the table as an accompaniment to meat or fish, the heighten the flavor of salads, or as an accompaniment to Tunisian couscous:
Combine 4 teaspoons harissa paste, 4 teaspoons water, 2 teaspoon olive oil, and 1 or 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice in a small bowl and blend well makes 1/4 cup.

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from lebanese recipes

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spicy cilantro almond pesto

July 11, 2013

1 bunch fresh cilantro (2 cups loosely packed)
½ cup toasted almonds
juice of 1 lime
1″ section of fresh ginger, chopped
3 garlic cloves
¼ cup loosely packed mint leaves
squirt of honey, pinch of sugar, or your favorite sweetener
½ tsp salt
½ jalapeño (seeds included for more spice)
¼ cup olive oil

Combine all ingredients in a food processor, and process until smooth. Add more oil and salt as needed.

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adapted from the kitchen paper

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mint dressing

June 16, 2013

1/4 c. mint
1/2 c. rice wine vinegar (use raw acv to make this recipe raw)
1/4 c. honey
salt
pepper

combine

then slowly whisk in 1/3 c. oil (whatever oil you like to use for dressings)

eat on salads, vegetables, lamb, fruit salad, rice and beans, roasted fish, pork, or anything else you can dream of! how about a cucumber and tomato salad with mint dressing as a topping for falafel or burgers? a three-bean salad with mint dressing? spooned on top of green peas?

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peanut mint chutney

May 27, 2013

Peanuts: 1/2 cup
Fresh Mint Leaves: 1/2 cup, packed
Onion: 1 large sized
Green Chillies: 6
Tamarind Extract : 1 tbsp or as needed
Salt to taste
Oil: 2 tsp

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Mustard Seeds: 1/2 tsp
Urad Dal: 1/2 tsp
Cumin Seeds: 1/4 tsp
Hing (asafoetida): 1/8 tsp
Oil: 1 tsp

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1. Heat a heavy bottomed pan on a medium heat, slowly roast the peanut to golden brown color. Cool and rub the skins off.

2. Heat oil in a pan and add the chopped onions and slit green chillies. (If you’re raw or don’t eat onions, throw in some fresh raw garlic, or maybe a little fresh lime juice!)

3. Fry the onions until light brown color. Take them out of the pan and set aside.

4. In the same pan, add the mint leaves and fry for 3 – 4 minutes and turn off the flame and allow it to cool.

5.Grind the roasted peanuts, tamarind pulp, sauteed onions, sauteed mint and some salt to a smooth paste by adding a little water.

6. Transfer the chutney into a bowl and keep it aside.

7. Heat a teaspoon of oil in a pan for seasoning. Add the mustard seeds and urad dal and let them splutter.

8. When the seeds stop popping, add the hing and stir for a few seconds and turn off the heat.

9. Pour the tempered ingredients over the chutney and combine well. Serve with idli, dosa, ponga, or upma – or rice, veggies, meat, salad, or whatever else you can dream up!

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adapted from blend with spices

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I made a few alterations to this. First of all, I drastically decreased the amount of hot pepper, since a dinner guest was sensitive to spice. I also left out the asafoetida. This chutney is AMAZING. I served it alongside rice with chickpeas, dried fruit, and herbs, but I think this could potentially go with anything. It’s that perfect something to add when dinner needs a boost. I’m going to make a huge batch of this. I think it would be good on anything – cooked veggies or meat, cold salads – even just as a dip for raw veggies! Ground with a little extra water, this could make an amazing sauce, too. Highly recommended.

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simple light dressing for roasted vegetables

April 30, 2013

roast

leeks
carrots
potatoes
sweet potatoes
beets
onions
anything else in the world

in this dressing:

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½ lemon, zested and juiced
1 tsp mustard (not yellow hot dog mustard!)
2 garlic cloves, crushed
6 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

a few pepper corns, roughly crushed
salt to taste

1 tbsp honey (optional)
herbs, like rosemary or tarragon, whatever you like (optional)

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these ingredients together also makes a perfect salad dressing, with a few splashes of homemade fruit vinegar or whatever vinegar is your favorite.

i’d also bet it makes a great chicken marinade.

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adapted from this

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syrian yogurt and tahini sauces

February 4, 2013

Tahini Sauce: (theneh طحينة)

tahini (~4 T)
juice of half a lemon
salt
water
crushed garlic (opt.)

Add the tahini, lemon juice to a bowl and start mixing with a spoon. The mixture will become stiff and light in colour. Add a little water and mix again. Add the water small amount at a time until the mixture loosens to the consistency you want. It needs to be fairly loose but not water-runny. Add salt to taste.

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Yogurt and Tahini sauce: (Laban wa theneh لبن و طحينة)

This combination is mainly used as a base of many Syrian dishes; Mutabal, Ful bi Laban, Fatteh to name a few.

I occasionally use this combination as a side sauce instead of the pure tahini sauce described above. It is easier to eat as yogurt adds a nice tangy flavour that balance the heaviness of the tahini. I always serve this version with Lahmeh bil saniyeh.

Greek style yogurt 300g
tahini (~3 T)
lemon
salt

To make the sauce whisk together the yogurt and tahini. Add salt and lemon to taste. If the sauce is too thick, loosen with some water.

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Taratour: (طرطور)

thin the above tahini sauce and add “loads of chopped parsley”

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Yogurt and cucumber: (Laban wa khiyar لبن و خيار)

Every country of the Levant and all the neighboring territories have their own version of the famous Tzatziki. This is the Syrian one. In its native countries Tzatziki is usually used as an accompaniment unlike the Western interpretation of serving it as a dip.

In Syria we serve Laban wa Khiyar as a side sauce for “dry” rice and Bulgar pilaf. By dry I mean dishes with the grains as the main ingredient without a vegetable stew on the side. Riz bi Bazalia (Peas rice pilaf) Riz bi Ful (Broad bean rice pilf) and Burgul bi Ful (Broad bean Bulgar pilaf) are some delicious examples.

Yogurt 300g
One cucumber
Salt
Lemon
Garlic one clove
Dry mint 1tsp

Peel and finely chop the cucumber. Add the yogurt, dry mint and crushed garlic. Mix well and add salt and lemon to taste. Thin the mixture with some water if required to get the right consistency.

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from syrian foodie

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raw tomato sauce

September 13, 2012

1 very large red or yellow bell pepper, deseeded
¾ cup cherry or roma tomatoes
¼ cup sundried tomatoes
1 Tablespoon olive oil
¼ teaspoon salt
a sprig of fresh oregano
a few sprigs of fresh basil
2 dates or honey to taste

blend

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adapted from here

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EDIT:

today’s fantastic herbed tomato-”cream” raw pasta sauce:

a fistful of sundried tomatoes, soaked for four or six hours
a fistful of cashews, soaked for four or six hours
a huge pinch of fresh oregano
a fistful of fresh basil
a few cloves of garlic
a few turnip greens
a fistful of other assorted fresh herbs
three big locally grown heirloom tomatoes
two locally grown red peppers
a squeeze of lime juice
two pinches of salt
a dash of oil (olive, nut oils, whatever)

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chimichurri

September 9, 2012

The Best Chimichurri
adapted by csagourmet from Michael Chiarello

1 bunch fresh flat leaf parsley (twist off and discard the tougher stems at the bottom)
1 handful fresh cilantro (not tougher stems at the bottom)
2 Tbsp. fresh oregano (measured as full leaves, not chopped)
2 medium-large cloves garlic, peeled
1/2 c. red wine vinegar (get good stuff, there’s no cooking here)
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper
1 1/2 tsp smoked paprika
3/4 c. extra virgin olive oil (again, get the good stuff)

Put all ingredients except olive oil in a food processor. Purée. Slowly stream in olive oil with the food processor running.

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Really delicious! Very complex flavor for something so simple. I served it to my mother with fish. She wasn’t into the idea of it, but once she tasted it, she asked if she could use the leftovers for her lunch the next day. Highly, highly recommended.

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