Archive for the ‘eggs’ Category

h1

eggs benedict

April 21, 2013

2 English muffins
4 slices ham each slice 1/8 inch thick
4 large eggs
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 large egg yolk
1 pinch Meyer lemon zest (or any lemon zest)
1 sprig fresh marjoram or sage (or not)
2 tablespoons boiling water
1 teaspoon Meyer lemon juice (or any lemon juice)
salt to taste

Poach eggs
Poke the tines of a fork into the sides of the English muffins, working your way all the way around the muffin to split them in half. Toast until lightly browned.
Fry the ham until browned, but not tough or chewy
Start the Hollandaise sauce as soon as you start poaching the eggs. Setup a double boiler by finding a heatproof bowl that sits on the rim of a pot, then add 1/2″ of water to the pot before covering it with the bowl. The bottom of the bowl should not be touching the water.
Add the egg yolk and butter into the bowl and turn on the heat to medium. Whisk together until there are no lumps and the mixture is smooth.
Add the lemon zest, marjoram and salt and then slowly add the boiling water while whisking constantly (it may be helpful to have someone pour the water for you). Continue whisking until the mixture is thick and creamy (about the consistency of thin gravy) or if you have an instant read thermometer it should read 160 degrees F (71 C). Do not overcook it or it will get lumpy.
Use a towel or oven mitt to remove the bowl from the pot, then whisk in the lemon juice. Taste and adjust seasonings to taste. The Hollandaise Sauce needs to be used immediately or it will clump. If you need to hold it, you can periodically warm it in the double boiler while whisking to maintain a constant temperature between 150 and 160 degrees F.
To assemble your Eggs Benedict, put the toasted English Muffins on plates, top with a slice of ham, top with a poached egg, then finish with a generous blanket of Hollandaise Sauce. Garnish with paprika and serve immediately.

+

In the original recipe, there are words of wisdom regarding timing:

“The most important part of making Eggs Benedict is the timing… The timing takes some practice to nail, but if you’re a newbie, I’d recommend toasting the bread and searing the ham while you wait for the water for the poached egg to boil and prep the ingredients for the sauce. Then, as soon as you lower the eggs into the water, start making the sauce, which should be done right around the time you pull the eggs from the water.”

+

wonderful recipe and unnecessary capitalization by no recipes

h1

perfect poached eggs

April 21, 2013

really into poached eggs lately. looked up how to get the whites to stay together. seems easy enough, and i hate wasting all those bits of egg white!

+

Heat the water: Add enough water to come 1 inch up the side of a narrow, deep 2-quart saucier. Add 1 teaspoon kosher salt and 2 teaspoons white vinegar and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Meanwhile, crack 1 very fresh cold large egg into a cup. Use the handle of a spatula or spoon to quickly stir the water in one direction until it’s all smoothly spinning around.

TIP: Use this whirlpool method when poaching a single serving (one or two eggs). For bigger batches, heat the water, salt and vinegar in a 12-inch nonstick skillet and do not stir.

Add the egg: Carefully drop the egg into the center of the whirlpool. The swirling water will help prevent the white from “feathering,” or spreading out in the pan.

Let it poach: Turn off the heat, cover the pan and set your timer for 5 minutes. Don’t peek, poke, stir or accost the egg in any way.

+

from tv

h1

how to fry an egg

October 7, 2012

really?

according to this very compelling photoseries, a very gross-sounding cooking method – immersion frying an egg – is the best method.

i’m disgusted and intrigued like the original poster, and i’ll definitely try it.

h1

vegetarian welsh “glamorgan sausages”

September 29, 2012

glamorgan sausages are a traditional welsh dish.

+

25g/1oz butter
115g/4oz leeks, trimmed, finely sliced (prepared weight)
175g/6oz breadcrumbs (make them yourself by toasting stale bread and crumbling it!)
2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
1 tbsp chopped fresh thyme
150g/5oz Caerphilly cheese or Welsh Cheddar, finely grated
2 free-range eggs, separated
1 tsp English mustard
½ tsp flaked sea salt
5 tbsp sunflower oil
freshly ground black pepper

melt the butter in a large non-stick frying pan and fry the leek gently for 8-10minutes, or until very soft but not coloured.
Put 100g/3½oz of the breadcrumbs, the parsley, thyme and cheese in a large mixing bowl and mix until well combined. Beat the egg yolks with the mustard, salt and plenty of freshly ground black pepper in a separate bowl.
Remove the frying pan from the heat and tip the leeks into the bowl with the breadcrumbs. Add the egg yolks and mix together well with a large wooden spoon until well combined. Divide the leek mixture into eight portions and roll into sausage shapes.
Whisk the egg whites lightly in a bowl with a large metal whisk until just frothy. Sprinkle 40g/1½oz breadcrumbs over a large plate. Dip the sausages one at a time into the beaten egg and roll in the breadcrumbs until evenly coated, then place on the baking tray. Chill the sausages in the fridge for 30 minutes.

fry on medium heat 10-12 mins, turning regularly.

+

edit 10/7:

no thyme, parsley, or leeks in the house. subbed in fresh cilantro and mint, dried basil, powdered onion and garlic, and a pinch of coconut powder, and dipped them in corn flour instead of breadcrumbs.

tasted sort of like crunchy fried cilantro bread, and sort of like something weird you’d get at a carnival from the deep-fried corn flour taste. not bad; curious to try them cooked in a real deep-fryer and with the leeks.

great way to use old stale bread. it would be fun for kids, too, since squishing is a required part of the cooking process.

h1

sweet fermented rice pancakes

May 7, 2012

i’m making pak thong kuih – a lacto-fermented rice dessert.

for the first two parts of the recipe, some of the “starter” is removed. what to do with all that extra yeasty sweet rice?

+

super fast and easy sweet and sour fermented rice pancakes

from goop to plate in less than ten minutes.

ingredients

+ a fistful of yeasty sweet rice leftover from fermenting pak thong kuih (or substitute leftover cooked plain rice – maybe with a little lime juice? i’ll have to try that.)
+ a fistful of mashed sweet potato
+ two pinches of coconut powder
+ one pinch of corn starch
+ one egg (increase corn starch for a vegan version)
+ a pinch each of fennel, cayenne, seasoned salt, coriander, and two pinches of ginger and black pepper
+ a tablespoon or so of date syrup

+

fry on medium heat like any pancake or burger.

+

serve with applesauce

+

i invented this recipe tonight, and i couldn’t be happier with it! hopefully the honeycomb dessert is good so i have a reason to ferment more rice, because this was a quick, easy, awesome snack!

h1

oeufs en cocotte

January 4, 2012

this post made me laugh for a number of reasons.

mostly, i was laughing because i happen to be visiting a house that actually has ridiculous things like ramekins, cream, and Parmesan. and fresh rosemary in the middle of winter! ah, mom.

this recipe would be easy to alter, i think, to use less expensive ingredients. comment with your own, if you try it!

here’s what i did

1. boiled a few cups of water in a pot.
2. preheated oven to 400.
3. greased a ramekin with butter and poured a thin layer of cream over it.
4. cracked two eggs into the ramekin.
5. salted, peppered, and nutmegged the raw eggs.
6. poured a dash of cream and a little grated Parmesan on top of the eggs.
7. poured boiled water into a small pyrex.
8. sat the ramekin inside the pyrex and baked the whole thing for 25 minutes.

the recipe said to do it for 15, but i checked every five minutes and it still looked swimmy on top.

when i tore into it, the eggs were somewhere between hard-boiled and soft-boiled – i’d stick with the 15 minute calculation next time.

delicious! the water gives the eggs a velvety texture, and i like the creaminess.

wonder if this would work with whole milk?

it was a wonderful treat, but between the time required and the cost of the ingredients i’d save this for a special occasion.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 79 other followers