Archive for the ‘condiments’ Category

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doubles

July 22, 2014

this is the quintessential trinidadian street food.

savory, sweet, hot, filling, and wonderful.

doubles consist of two (hence the name) flat pieces of fry-bread called BARA filled with a chickpea mixture.

it is also agreed throughout the recipes i checked out that the chickpeas and bara themselves are not the sweet, spicy, and sour flavor doubles are known for. this flavor comes from the condiments. see below for toppings!

it is the kind of street food that people in trinidad don’t really cook at home (source) but if you have a craving like i do, you can try to make it at home.
the doubles i got at trini-gul in a west indian neighborhood in brooklyn were one of the best foods i’ve ever had in my entire life.

i hope to make them at home and have them taste even half as good.

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bara

2 cups flour
1/2 tsp salt
1 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp ground pepper
1 T baking powder
1 teaspoon yeast
1/3 cup warm water
1/4 tsp sugar
Oil for frying

place warm water, sugar, and yeast in a bowl until foamy.

knead ingredients together until dough is smooth.

pour a bit of oil over the top, cover the bowl with a kitchen towel, and rest until dough doubles.

oil or wet your hands – dough is sticky. make two-inch balls. flatten to the size of your hand.

fry, at about forty seconds per side or until puffy and done.

adapted from trini gourmet, simply trini cooking, and chennette

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chickpeas

heat 1 T oil in a heavy bottomed pot or pan. add a chopped onion. when soft, add 1 t curry powder, 1 t turmeric, three cloves of garlic minced, 2 t ground cumin, 2 t salt, 1 t pepper, 5 leaves chadon beni (bandhania/culantro/long cilantro, or substitute cilantro,) and 1 t trinidadian pepper sauce. stir-fry until fragrant. add 2 c chickpeas and a cup of water. simmer until chickpeas are soft.

adapted from trini gourmet, simply trini cooking, amazing trinidad, and chennette.

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you MUST top with grated or preserved cucumbers or cucumber chutney, mango kuchela (trinidadian sweet&sour chutney,) and tamarind sauce to get that flavor!

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cortido (latin american sauerkraut)

May 18, 2014

i know the basics on kefir, yogurt, and fermenting veggies, so i don’t tend to read beginner’s guides. i should, though – they are full of fun recipes i’ve never tried….
like this one!
i imagine this is perfect at a barbecue heaped on to grilled veggies or hot dogs!

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cortido

1 large cabbage, cored and shredded
1 cup grated carrots
2 medium onions, quartered lengthwise and very finely sliced
2 garlic cloves, minced (optional)
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
4 tablespoons sea salt
1 tablespoon whey (optional, to kick-start fermentation)

pound (optional) and combine ingredients.

from cultures for health

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ferment in a fido jar, a mason jar with weights, a crock, a pickler, or anything non-reactive. you can even use a casserole dish with a plate on top!

for more information about how to ferment, check out:

- sandor katz’s Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods

- sandor katz’s The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from around the World,

- cultures for health’s lacto-fermentation e-book

- or my quick run-down

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amazing! delicious! sweet, savory, full of flavor – BETTER THAN SAUERKRAUT! try this today!

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mango salsa

May 4, 2014

put part of a jalapeno, part of an onion (scallions, green onions, wild leeks, red onions – can’t go wrong here,) and some roasted garlic (raw if you prefer) into the food processor (to taste)

add lime juice and a lot of cilantro

add two mangoes and a sweet red or orange bell pepper

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serve with absolutely everything on earth

especially

fish
chicken
tofu
pork
veggies
salads
chips
and literally everything else

today’s teriyaki chicken wings go well with it. so does tomorrow’s fish cake. even burgers can be made magical by this sweet and sour hot sauce.

blend it completely as a marinade, or leave it chunky as a salsa for dipping.

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la jiao jiang (hot pepper oil)

February 5, 2014

chinese hot chili pepper paste in oil.

the paste is great, and the superpowered hot oil is perfect for opening up your sinuses on a winter night. drizzle the oil over salads, use it in stirfry or chili, fry eggs in it, top hummus with it…

gorgeous visual directions here, but if you prefer text, here it is.

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heat lots of oil. fry one minced onion until color begins to change.

grind up many spicy dried hot chili peppers with your food processor, blender, spice grinder, or mortar and pestle to make pepper flakes.

add dried pepper flakes to frying pan and open a window.
(seriously. pepper spray. open your windows.)

add a lot of sesame seeds.

cook quite a long time on low heat until caramelized and browned.

when browned. add contents to mason jar and top with a layer of oil.

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from here – thanks, mark!

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i made it today and i recommend you do the same.

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cranberry sauce with red wine and figs

November 28, 2013

water as needed
1 splash – 1 cup of red wine
half a packet of dried figs (about 10-12)
a half-cup to a cup of fresh, frozen, or dried cranberries, cherries, and whatever else you have
just a bit of fresh orange zest, orange juice, or candied orange
one quick squeeze of a fresh lemon
a pinch powdered allspice or cinnamon
a t apple cider or red wine vinegar
if you need a sweetener, use whatever you like – honey, sugar, etc.

bring to a boil and simmer until sweet and tender. continue adding water, as the figs will soak up a lot of liquid.

if you prefer it thicker, add a pinch of potato starch or corn starch.

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modified from david lebowitz‘s version

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goddess dressing

August 11, 2013

This incredible blogger modified this recipe ten times in an attempt to perfect it. Combined with legumes like beans, this dressing forms a complete protein!

Perfect dairy substitute!

Consider this revision eleven, because I found revision ten way too salty.

2/3 cup expeller-pressed canola oil, other neutral oil, or even extra-virgin olive oil (146 grams)
1/3 cup tahini, as thick as possible (80 grams)
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar (60g) [may need another tsp. for a total of 65 grams]
1 1/2 Tbs. soy sauce (24 grams) [depends on your soy sauce---you may want to start with just 4 tsp., about 21 grams]
1 1/2 Tbs. lemon juice (23 grams)
1/2 – 1 1/2 tsp. fine sea salt (~9 grams or less)
2 medium cloves garlic (~9 grams)
1 Tbs. white sesame seeds, lightly toasted til light golden brown (~9 grams after toasting)
2 Tbs. minced parsley (8 grams) [or 2-4 tsp. dried parsley??]
2 Tbs. minced chives (6 grams) [or 2-4 tsp. dried chives??]
water, if needed, to thin, or xanthan gum to thicken

Measure out your oil into the container you’re going to blend the dressing in. Tip: use a 1/3 cup measuring cup to measure the oil, then reuse the cup for the tahini. You’ll have one less cup to clean and the tahini will come out more easily.
Add the tahini. Note: If your tahini is not already made from toasted sesame seeds, then you may want to toast it yourself in a small skillet or pan over low heat until lightly fragrant. You’ll probably need to toast a little extra to end up with the 80g needed. (Some is always lost to the pan.)
Combine all the remaining ingredients except for water and herbs, and use a stick blender or food processor to blend it. You can also mix the dressing by hand, but then you’ll need to finely mince or crush the garlic, and the sesame seeds won’t get fully integrated.
Finally, stir or whisk in the herbs and water. You add the herbs after blending because you want flecks of green, not a uniform green/brown color. It’s best to hold off on adding the water until the end because the amount depends on how thick your tahini was. You’ll want to add just enough water to reach the desired consistency.
Makes about 2 cups, or 16 two-tablespoon (~30g) servings. Fits perfectly into one of the larger Annie’s dressing bottles. You’ll just need a funnel to fill it. Or you can just leave it in the container you blended it in, or transfer it to a pint-size ball jar.

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modified from the hard work at the captious vegetarian

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This dressing is fantastic, and so far has been perfect on everything.

It replaces:
sour cream – try it on potatoes!
cheese – try it on vegan broccoli casserole!
mayonnaise – amazing on bean salad or chicken salad!

& of course, it’s fantastic on green salads, too.

You must try this even if you’re not veg or into healthy eating – it’s my new favorite thing to put on a hamburger and french fries. To be honest, I have put it on everything recently. I went through two cups of it in less than a month.

Try this!

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onion tomato chutney

August 11, 2013

an onion
a few small tomatoes or a big tomato
3 cloves garlic, whole
2 T roasted gram or urad dal or other split pulse
2 t oil
3-5 dried red chili peppers
1/4 t tamarind paste
3 curry leaves
1/4 t mustard seed
salt, to taste

peel garlic cloves and add whole chilis and whole garlic cloves to medium-hot pan with oil. roast. add chopped onions. salt and saute until golden. add tomato and cook until mushy. add roasted gram/lentils. switch off flame. add tamarind. cool and grind with a little water. temper curry leaves and mustard seeds in an oiled pan and add to the food processor or mortar and pestle.

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adapted from jeyashri’s kitchen

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harissa

August 6, 2013

“Harissa is a North African hot red sauce or paste made from chili peppers (often smoked or dried) and garlic, often with coriander and caraway or cumin and served with olive oil…

Harissa is used both as a condiment and as an ingredient in recipes. It has been described as an important item in Tunisian cuisine. Harissa is also used in a few recipes of other North African cuisines, namely Morocco, Algeria and Libya…

In Tunisia, harissa is served at virtually every meal as part of an appetizer along with olives and tuna. It is also used as an ingredient in a meat (goat or lamb) or fish stew with vegetables. Harissa is also used to flavour the sauce for couscous… In Saharan regions, harissa can have a smoky flavor.” – lebanese recipes

Ingredients:

3 ounces mild and hot chilies (combine ancho, New Mexican, and guajillo chiles)
1 clove garlic crushed with 1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon coriander — ground
1 teaspoon caraway seed — ground
1 red bell pepper — roasted
1 teaspoon fine sea salt
olive oil

Preparation:

Stem, seed, and break up chilies. Place in a bowl and pour over boiling water. Cover and let stand 30 minutes. Drain; wrap in cheese cloth and press out excess moisture. Do the same for the red bell pepper.
Grind chilies in food processor with garlic, spices, red bell pepper, and salt. Add enough oil to make a thick paste.
Pack the mixture in a small dry jar; cover the harissa with a thin layer of oil, cover with a lid and keep refrigerated. Will keep 2 to 3 weeks in the refrigerator with a thin layer of oil.

Harissa Sauce:

Serve at the table as an accompaniment to meat or fish, the heighten the flavor of salads, or as an accompaniment to Tunisian couscous:
Combine 4 teaspoons harissa paste, 4 teaspoons water, 2 teaspoon olive oil, and 1 or 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice in a small bowl and blend well makes 1/4 cup.

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from lebanese recipes

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spicy cilantro almond pesto

July 11, 2013

1 bunch fresh cilantro (2 cups loosely packed)
½ cup toasted almonds
juice of 1 lime
1″ section of fresh ginger, chopped
3 garlic cloves
¼ cup loosely packed mint leaves
squirt of honey, pinch of sugar, or your favorite sweetener
½ tsp salt
½ jalapeño (seeds included for more spice)
¼ cup olive oil

Combine all ingredients in a food processor, and process until smooth. Add more oil and salt as needed.

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adapted from the kitchen paper

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fattoush

June 24, 2013

this is a refreshing palestinian and lebanese summer salad that is great as a condiment, or a small salad served with lunch. perfect on top of falafel, or with grilled veggies or meat.

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cut tomato, cucumber, green onion, and radish into very small pieces.

mince lettuce, parsley, and mint.

(optional: purslane, arugala, spinach, or another bitter green. sumac powder.)

combine, and dress in fresh lemon juice, salt, and olive oil.

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adapted from webgaza

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fantastic! i made this with only tomato, cucumber, and radish in a pinch, with green onions and parsley from the garden, and lemon juice over the top. we ate it with barbecued veggies and meats. it came out great. everyone loved it. recommended!

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