Archive for the ‘condiments’ Category

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la jiao jiang (hot pepper oil)

February 5, 2014

chinese hot chili pepper paste in oil.

the paste is great, and the superpowered hot oil is perfect for opening up your sinuses on a winter night. drizzle the oil over salads, use it in stirfry or chili, fry eggs in it, top hummus with it…

gorgeous visual directions here, but if you prefer text, here it is.

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heat lots of oil. fry one minced onion until color begins to change.

grind up many spicy dried peppers in your food processor.

add dried pepper flakes to frying pan and open a window.

add a lot of sesame seeds.

cook quite a long time on low heat.

when browned. add contents to mason jar and top with a layer of oil.

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from here – thanks, mark!

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i made it today and i recommend you do the same.

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cranberry sauce with red wine and figs

November 28, 2013

water as needed
1 splash – 1 cup of red wine
half a packet of dried figs (about 10-12)
a half-cup to a cup of fresh, frozen, or dried cranberries, cherries, and whatever else you have
just a bit of fresh orange zest, orange juice, or candied orange
one quick squeeze of a fresh lemon
a pinch powdered allspice or cinnamon
a t apple cider or red wine vinegar
if you need a sweetener, use whatever you like – honey, sugar, etc.

bring to a boil and simmer until sweet and tender. continue adding water, as the figs will soak up a lot of liquid.

if you prefer it thicker, add a pinch of potato starch or corn starch.

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modified from david lebowitz‘s version

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goddess dressing

August 11, 2013

This incredible blogger modified this recipe ten times in an attempt to perfect it. Combined with legumes like beans, this dressing forms a complete protein!

Perfect dairy substitute!

Consider this revision eleven, because I found revision ten way too salty.

2/3 cup expeller-pressed canola oil, other neutral oil, or even extra-virgin olive oil (146 grams)
1/3 cup tahini, as thick as possible (80 grams)
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar (60g) [may need another tsp. for a total of 65 grams]
1 1/2 Tbs. soy sauce (24 grams) [depends on your soy sauce---you may want to start with just 4 tsp., about 21 grams]
1 1/2 Tbs. lemon juice (23 grams)
1/2 – 1 1/2 tsp. fine sea salt (~9 grams or less)
2 medium cloves garlic (~9 grams)
1 Tbs. white sesame seeds, lightly toasted til light golden brown (~9 grams after toasting)
2 Tbs. minced parsley (8 grams) [or 2-4 tsp. dried parsley??]
2 Tbs. minced chives (6 grams) [or 2-4 tsp. dried chives??]
water, if needed, to thin, or xanthan gum to thicken

Measure out your oil into the container you’re going to blend the dressing in. Tip: use a 1/3 cup measuring cup to measure the oil, then reuse the cup for the tahini. You’ll have one less cup to clean and the tahini will come out more easily.
Add the tahini. Note: If your tahini is not already made from toasted sesame seeds, then you may want to toast it yourself in a small skillet or pan over low heat until lightly fragrant. You’ll probably need to toast a little extra to end up with the 80g needed. (Some is always lost to the pan.)
Combine all the remaining ingredients except for water and herbs, and use a stick blender or food processor to blend it. You can also mix the dressing by hand, but then you’ll need to finely mince or crush the garlic, and the sesame seeds won’t get fully integrated.
Finally, stir or whisk in the herbs and water. You add the herbs after blending because you want flecks of green, not a uniform green/brown color. It’s best to hold off on adding the water until the end because the amount depends on how thick your tahini was. You’ll want to add just enough water to reach the desired consistency.
Makes about 2 cups, or 16 two-tablespoon (~30g) servings. Fits perfectly into one of the larger Annie’s dressing bottles. You’ll just need a funnel to fill it. Or you can just leave it in the container you blended it in, or transfer it to a pint-size ball jar.

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modified from the hard work at the captious vegetarian

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This dressing is fantastic, and so far has been perfect on everything.

It replaces:
sour cream – try it on potatoes!
cheese – try it on vegan broccoli casserole!
mayonnaise – amazing on bean salad or chicken salad!

& of course, it’s fantastic on green salads, too.

You must try this even if you’re not veg or into healthy eating – it’s my new favorite thing to put on a hamburger and french fries. To be honest, I have put it on everything recently. I went through two cups of it in less than a month.

Try this!

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onion tomato chutney

August 11, 2013

an onion
a few small tomatoes or a big tomato
3 cloves garlic, whole
2 T roasted gram or urad dal or other split pulse
2 t oil
3-5 dried red chili peppers
1/4 t tamarind paste
3 curry leaves
1/4 t mustard seed
salt, to taste

peel garlic cloves and add whole chilis and whole garlic cloves to medium-hot pan with oil. roast. add chopped onions. salt and saute until golden. add tomato and cook until mushy. add roasted gram/lentils. switch off flame. add tamarind. cool and grind with a little water. temper curry leaves and mustard seeds in an oiled pan and add to the food processor or mortar and pestle.

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adapted from jeyashri’s kitchen

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harissa

August 6, 2013

“Harissa is a North African hot red sauce or paste made from chili peppers (often smoked or dried) and garlic, often with coriander and caraway or cumin and served with olive oil…

Harissa is used both as a condiment and as an ingredient in recipes. It has been described as an important item in Tunisian cuisine. Harissa is also used in a few recipes of other North African cuisines, namely Morocco, Algeria and Libya…

In Tunisia, harissa is served at virtually every meal as part of an appetizer along with olives and tuna. It is also used as an ingredient in a meat (goat or lamb) or fish stew with vegetables. Harissa is also used to flavour the sauce for couscous… In Saharan regions, harissa can have a smoky flavor.” – lebanese recipes

Ingredients:

3 ounces mild and hot chilies (combine ancho, New Mexican, and guajillo chiles)
1 clove garlic crushed with 1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon coriander — ground
1 teaspoon caraway seed — ground
1 red bell pepper — roasted
1 teaspoon fine sea salt
olive oil

Preparation:

Stem, seed, and break up chilies. Place in a bowl and pour over boiling water. Cover and let stand 30 minutes. Drain; wrap in cheese cloth and press out excess moisture. Do the same for the red bell pepper.
Grind chilies in food processor with garlic, spices, red bell pepper, and salt. Add enough oil to make a thick paste.
Pack the mixture in a small dry jar; cover the harissa with a thin layer of oil, cover with a lid and keep refrigerated. Will keep 2 to 3 weeks in the refrigerator with a thin layer of oil.

Harissa Sauce:

Serve at the table as an accompaniment to meat or fish, the heighten the flavor of salads, or as an accompaniment to Tunisian couscous:
Combine 4 teaspoons harissa paste, 4 teaspoons water, 2 teaspoon olive oil, and 1 or 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice in a small bowl and blend well makes 1/4 cup.

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from lebanese recipes

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spicy cilantro almond pesto

July 11, 2013

1 bunch fresh cilantro (2 cups loosely packed)
½ cup toasted almonds
juice of 1 lime
1″ section of fresh ginger, chopped
3 garlic cloves
¼ cup loosely packed mint leaves
squirt of honey, pinch of sugar, or your favorite sweetener
½ tsp salt
½ jalapeño (seeds included for more spice)
¼ cup olive oil

Combine all ingredients in a food processor, and process until smooth. Add more oil and salt as needed.

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adapted from the kitchen paper

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fattoush

June 24, 2013

this is a refreshing palestinian and lebanese summer salad that is great as a condiment, or a small salad served with lunch. perfect on top of falafel, or with grilled veggies or meat.

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cut tomato, cucumber, green onion, and radish into very small pieces.

mince lettuce, parsley, and mint.

(optional: purslane, arugala, spinach, or another bitter green. sumac powder.)

combine, and dress in fresh lemon juice, salt, and olive oil.

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adapted from webgaza

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fantastic! i made this with only tomato, cucumber, and radish in a pinch, with green onions and parsley from the garden, and lemon juice over the top. we ate it with barbecued veggies and meats. it came out great. everyone loved it. recommended!

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mint dressing

June 16, 2013

1/4 c. mint
1/2 c. rice wine vinegar (use raw acv to make this recipe raw)
1/4 c. honey
salt
pepper

combine

then slowly whisk in 1/3 c. oil (whatever oil you like to use for dressings)

eat on salads, vegetables, lamb, fruit salad, rice and beans, roasted fish, pork, or anything else you can dream of! how about a cucumber and tomato salad with mint dressing as a topping for falafel or burgers? a three-bean salad with mint dressing? spooned on top of green peas?

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peanut mint chutney

May 27, 2013

Peanuts: 1/2 cup
Fresh Mint Leaves: 1/2 cup, packed
Onion: 1 large sized
Green Chillies: 6
Tamarind Extract : 1 tbsp or as needed
Salt to taste
Oil: 2 tsp

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Mustard Seeds: 1/2 tsp
Urad Dal: 1/2 tsp
Cumin Seeds: 1/4 tsp
Hing (asafoetida): 1/8 tsp
Oil: 1 tsp

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1. Heat a heavy bottomed pan on a medium heat, slowly roast the peanut to golden brown color. Cool and rub the skins off.

2. Heat oil in a pan and add the chopped onions and slit green chillies. (If you’re raw or don’t eat onions, throw in some fresh raw garlic, or maybe a little fresh lime juice!)

3. Fry the onions until light brown color. Take them out of the pan and set aside.

4. In the same pan, add the mint leaves and fry for 3 – 4 minutes and turn off the flame and allow it to cool.

5.Grind the roasted peanuts, tamarind pulp, sauteed onions, sauteed mint and some salt to a smooth paste by adding a little water.

6. Transfer the chutney into a bowl and keep it aside.

7. Heat a teaspoon of oil in a pan for seasoning. Add the mustard seeds and urad dal and let them splutter.

8. When the seeds stop popping, add the hing and stir for a few seconds and turn off the heat.

9. Pour the tempered ingredients over the chutney and combine well. Serve with idli, dosa, ponga, or upma – or rice, veggies, meat, salad, or whatever else you can dream up!

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adapted from blend with spices

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I made a few alterations to this. First of all, I drastically decreased the amount of hot pepper, since a dinner guest was sensitive to spice. I also left out the asafoetida. This chutney is AMAZING. I served it alongside rice with chickpeas, dried fruit, and herbs, but I think this could potentially go with anything. It’s that perfect something to add when dinner needs a boost. I’m going to make a huge batch of this. I think it would be good on anything – cooked veggies or meat, cold salads – even just as a dip for raw veggies! Ground with a little extra water, this could make an amazing sauce, too. Highly recommended.

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andhra style mango pickle

May 17, 2013

4 large green unripe raw mangoes, washed, peeled, and finely grated
1/2 Cup of Sesame Oil
~ 7 tbsp of Red chilli powder (Depends on your spice level)
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
1/4 tsp black mustard seeds
1/2 tsp of Asafoetida
1 1/2 tbsp of roasted mustard-fenugreek seeds powder (each in equal ratio)
salt to taste

Wash the mangoes and peel off the skin and grate them using a grater. Leftover pieces can be cut thin.
Heat a heavy bottomed non stick pan. Add sesame oil.
Cook the pickle on medium flame. Add mustard seeds, asafoetida, salt and turmeric powder.
Add grated mango to the tempering and fry for 15-20 minutes on medium flame, stirring occasionally.
Once the raw smell of mangoes are gone, switch off the stove.
Immediately add red chilli powder and roasted mustard-fenugreek powder to the grated mango mixture and mix well.
Let it cool for about 1-2 hrs. It will ooze oil. Check for salt and add accordingly.
Refrigerate the pickle. Eat using a dry spoon. The pickle lasts about a month.

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adapted from the tales of my cooking

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